publication . Preprint . Article . 2004

Quantum information and general relativity

Asher Peres;
Open Access English
  • Published: 21 May 2004
Abstract
The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox (1935) is reexamined in the light of Shannon's information theory (1948). The EPR argument did not take into account that the observers' information was localized, like any other physical object. General relativity introduces new problems: there are horizons which act as one-way membranes for the propagation of quantum information, in particular black holes which act like sinks.
Persistent Identifiers
Subjects
arXiv: General Relativity and Quantum Cosmology
free text keywords: Quantum Physics, General Physics and Astronomy, General relativity, Quantum information, Black hole, Physics, Information theory, Theoretical physics

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