publication . Article . 2013

The fourth dimension of tool use: temporally enduring artefacts aid primates learning to use tools

Dorothy M. Fragaszy; Dora Biro; Yonat Eshchar; Tatyana Humle; Patrícia Izar; Briseida Dôgo de Resende; Elisabetta Visalberghi;
Open Access English
  • Published: 07 Oct 2013
  • Publisher: The Royal Society
  • Country: United Kingdom
Abstract
All investigated cases of habitual tool use in wild chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys include youngsters encountering durable artefacts, most often in a supportive social context. We propose that enduring artefacts associated with tool use, such as previously used tools, partly processed food items and residual material from previous activity, aid non-human primates to learn to use tools, and to develop expertise in their use, thus contributing to traditional technologies in non-humans. Therefore, social contributions to tool use can be considered as situated in the three dimensions of Euclidean space, and in the fourth dimension of time. This notion expands the ...
Persistent Identifiers
Subjects
free text keywords: BF, GN, QL, 42, 70, 203, Articles, Research Article, niche construction, artefact, tools, expertise, Sapajus libidinosus, Pan troglodytes, General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology, General Agricultural and Biological Sciences, Niche construction, Situated, Sapajus libidinosus, Cognitive psychology, Computer science, Fourth Dimension, Social environment
Related Organizations
87 references, page 1 of 6

1 McGrew WC 2004 The cultured chimpanzee: reflections on cultural primatology. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

2 Boesch C 2012 Wild cultures: a comparison between chimpanzee and human cultures. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

3 Whiten A 1999 Cultures in chimpanzees. Nature 399, 682–685. (10.1038/21415)10385119 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

4 van Schaik CP Fox EA Fechtman LT 2003 Individual variation in the rate of use of tree-hole tools among wild orang-utans: implications for hominin evolution. J. Hum. Evol.44, 11–23. (10.1016/S0047-2484(02)00164-1)12604301 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

5 Sargeant BL Mann J 2009 Developmental evidence for foraging traditions in wild bottlenose dolphins. Anim. Behav.78, 715–721. (10.1016/j.anbehav.2009.05.037) [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

6 Fragaszy D Perry S 2003 Towards a biology of traditions. In Traditions in nonhuman animals: models and evidence (eds Fragaszy D Perry S), pp. 1–32. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. [OpenAIRE]

7 Fragaszy D Visalberghi E 2001 Recognizing a swan: socially-biased learning. Psychologia 44, 82–98.

8 Coussi-Korbel S Fragaszy D 1995 On the relation between social dynamics and social learning. Anim. Behav.80, 955–964.

9 Burkart J Hrdy S van Schaik C 2009 Cooperative breeding and human cognitive evolution. Evol. Anthropol.18, 175–186. (10.1002/evan.20222) [DOI]

10 Rapaport L Brown G 2008 Social influences on foraging behavior in young nonhuman primates: learning what, where, and how to eat. Evol. Anthropol.17, 189–201. (10.1002/evan.20180) [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

11 Matsuzawa T (ed.) 2001 Primate origins of human cognition and behavior. Tokyo, Japan: Springer.

12 Humle T Fragaszy D 2010 Cognition and tool use. In Primates in perspective (eds Campbell C Fuentes A MacKinnon K Bearder S Stumpf R), pp. 637–661. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

13 Tomasello M Call J 1997 Primate cognition. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

14 Matsuzawa T 2001 Primate foundations of human intelligence: a view of tool use in nonhuman primates and fossil hominids. In Primate origins of human cognition and behavior (ed. Matsuzawa T). Tokyo, Japan: Springer.

15 Luncz LV Mundry R Boesch C 2012 Evidence for cultural differences between neighboring chimpanzee communities. Curr. Biol.22, 922–926. (10.1016/j.cub.2012.03.031)22578420 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

87 references, page 1 of 6
Abstract
All investigated cases of habitual tool use in wild chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys include youngsters encountering durable artefacts, most often in a supportive social context. We propose that enduring artefacts associated with tool use, such as previously used tools, partly processed food items and residual material from previous activity, aid non-human primates to learn to use tools, and to develop expertise in their use, thus contributing to traditional technologies in non-humans. Therefore, social contributions to tool use can be considered as situated in the three dimensions of Euclidean space, and in the fourth dimension of time. This notion expands the ...
Persistent Identifiers
Subjects
free text keywords: BF, GN, QL, 42, 70, 203, Articles, Research Article, niche construction, artefact, tools, expertise, Sapajus libidinosus, Pan troglodytes, General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology, General Agricultural and Biological Sciences, Niche construction, Situated, Sapajus libidinosus, Cognitive psychology, Computer science, Fourth Dimension, Social environment
Related Organizations
87 references, page 1 of 6

1 McGrew WC 2004 The cultured chimpanzee: reflections on cultural primatology. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

2 Boesch C 2012 Wild cultures: a comparison between chimpanzee and human cultures. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

3 Whiten A 1999 Cultures in chimpanzees. Nature 399, 682–685. (10.1038/21415)10385119 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

4 van Schaik CP Fox EA Fechtman LT 2003 Individual variation in the rate of use of tree-hole tools among wild orang-utans: implications for hominin evolution. J. Hum. Evol.44, 11–23. (10.1016/S0047-2484(02)00164-1)12604301 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

5 Sargeant BL Mann J 2009 Developmental evidence for foraging traditions in wild bottlenose dolphins. Anim. Behav.78, 715–721. (10.1016/j.anbehav.2009.05.037) [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

6 Fragaszy D Perry S 2003 Towards a biology of traditions. In Traditions in nonhuman animals: models and evidence (eds Fragaszy D Perry S), pp. 1–32. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. [OpenAIRE]

7 Fragaszy D Visalberghi E 2001 Recognizing a swan: socially-biased learning. Psychologia 44, 82–98.

8 Coussi-Korbel S Fragaszy D 1995 On the relation between social dynamics and social learning. Anim. Behav.80, 955–964.

9 Burkart J Hrdy S van Schaik C 2009 Cooperative breeding and human cognitive evolution. Evol. Anthropol.18, 175–186. (10.1002/evan.20222) [DOI]

10 Rapaport L Brown G 2008 Social influences on foraging behavior in young nonhuman primates: learning what, where, and how to eat. Evol. Anthropol.17, 189–201. (10.1002/evan.20180) [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

11 Matsuzawa T (ed.) 2001 Primate origins of human cognition and behavior. Tokyo, Japan: Springer.

12 Humle T Fragaszy D 2010 Cognition and tool use. In Primates in perspective (eds Campbell C Fuentes A MacKinnon K Bearder S Stumpf R), pp. 637–661. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

13 Tomasello M Call J 1997 Primate cognition. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

14 Matsuzawa T 2001 Primate foundations of human intelligence: a view of tool use in nonhuman primates and fossil hominids. In Primate origins of human cognition and behavior (ed. Matsuzawa T). Tokyo, Japan: Springer.

15 Luncz LV Mundry R Boesch C 2012 Evidence for cultural differences between neighboring chimpanzee communities. Curr. Biol.22, 922–926. (10.1016/j.cub.2012.03.031)22578420 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

87 references, page 1 of 6
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