publication . Article . 2015

Characterization of RanBPM Molecular Determinants that Control Its Subcellular Localization

Salemi, Louisa M.; Loureiro, Sandra O.; Schild-Poulter, Caroline;
Open Access English
  • Published: 06 Feb 2015 Journal: PLoS ONE (issn: 1932-6203, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Abstract
RanBPM/RanBP9 is a ubiquitous, nucleocytoplasmic protein that is part of an evolutionary conserved E3 ubiquitin ligase complex whose function and targets in mammals are still unknown. RanBPM itself has been implicated in various cellular processes that involve both nuclear and cytoplasmic functions. However, to date, little is known about how RanBPM subcellular localization is regulated. We have conducted a systematic analysis of RanBPM regions that control its subcellular localization using RanBPM shRNA cells to examine ectopic RanBPM mutant subcellular localization without interference from the endogenously expressed protein. We show that several domains and m...
Subjects
free text keywords: Medicine, R, Science, Q, Research Article, General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology, General Agricultural and Biological Sciences, General Medicine, Chromatin, Subcellular localization, Nuclear protein, Cell biology, Ubiquitin ligase, biology.protein, biology, Nuclear localization sequence, Signal transducing adaptor protein, Cell nucleus, medicine.anatomical_structure, Nuclear export signal
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  • Funder: Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
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67 references, page 1 of 5

1 Gorlich D, Kutay U (1999) TRANSPORT BETWEEN THE CELL NUCLEUS AND THE CYTOPLASM. Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology 15: 607–660. 10611974 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

2 Sorokin AV, Kim ER, Ovchinnikov LP (2007) Nucleocytoplasmic transport of proteins. Biochemistry (Mosc) 72: 1439–1457. 18282135 [PubMed]

3 Jans DA, Xiao CY, Lam MH (2000) Nuclear targeting signal recognition: a key control point in nuclear transport? Bioessays 22: 532–544. 10842307 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

4 Lange A, Mills RE, Lange CJ, Stewart M, Devine SE, et al (2007) Classical nuclear localization signals: definition, function, and interaction with importin alpha. J Biol Chem 282: 5101–5105. 17170104 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

5 Wagstaff KM, Jans DA (2009) Importins and beyond: non-conventional nuclear transport mechanisms. Traffic 10: 1188–1198. 10.1111/j.1600-0854.2009.00937.x 19548983 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

6 Perfetto L, Gherardini PF, Davey NE, Diella F, Helmer-Citterich M, et al (2013) Exploring the diversity of SPRY/B30.2-mediated interactions. Trends Biochem Sci 38: 38–46. 10.1016/j.tibs.2012.10.001 23164942 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

7 Gerlitz G, Darhin E, Giorgio G, Franco B, Reiner O (2005) Novel Functional Features of the LIS-H Domain: Role in Protein Dimerization, Half-Life and Cellular Localization. Cell Cycle 4: 1632–1640. 16258276 [PubMed]

8 Emes RD, Ponting CP (2001) A new sequence motif linking lissencephaly, Treacher Collins and oral-facial-digital type 1 syndromes, microtubule dynamics and cell migration. Hum Mol Genet 10: 2813–2820. 11734546 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

9 Mateja A, Cierpicki T, Paduch M, Derewenda ZS, Otlewski J (2006) The Dimerization Mechanism of LIS1 and its Implication for Proteins Containing the LisH Motif. J Mol Biol 357: 621–631. 16445939 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

10 Menon RP, Gibson TJ, Pastore A (2004) The C terminus of fragile X mental retardation protein interacts with the multi-domain Ran-binding protein in the microtubule-organising centre. J Mol Biol 343: 43–53. 15381419 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

11 Brunkhorst A, Karlen M, Shi J, Mikolajczyk M, Nelson MA, et al (2005) A specific role for the TFIID subunit TAF4 and RanBPM in neural progenitor differentiation. Mol Cell Neurosci 29: 250–258. 15911349 [PubMed]

12 Kramer S, Ozaki T, Miyazaki K, Kato C, Hanamoto T, et al (2005) Protein stability and function of p73 are modulated by a physical interaction with RanBPM in mammalian cultured cells. Oncogene 24: 938–944. 15558019 [PubMed]

13 Poirier M-B, Laflamme L, Langlois M-F (2006) Identification and characterization of RanBPM, a novel coactivator of thyroid hormone receptors. J Mol Endocrinol 36: 313–325. 16595702 [PubMed]

14 Rao MA, Cheng H, Quayle AN, Nishitani H, Nelson CC, et al (2002) RanBPM, a nuclear protein that interacts with and regulates transcriptional activity of androgen receptor and glucocorticoid receptor. J Biol Chem 277: 48020–48027. 12361945 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

15 Valiyaveettil M, Bentley AA, Gursahaney P, Hussien R, Chakravarti R, et al (2008) Novel role of the muskelin-RanBP9 complex as a nucleocytoplasmic mediator of cell morphology regulation. J Cell Biol 182: 727–739. 10.1083/jcb.200801133 18710924 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

67 references, page 1 of 5
Abstract
RanBPM/RanBP9 is a ubiquitous, nucleocytoplasmic protein that is part of an evolutionary conserved E3 ubiquitin ligase complex whose function and targets in mammals are still unknown. RanBPM itself has been implicated in various cellular processes that involve both nuclear and cytoplasmic functions. However, to date, little is known about how RanBPM subcellular localization is regulated. We have conducted a systematic analysis of RanBPM regions that control its subcellular localization using RanBPM shRNA cells to examine ectopic RanBPM mutant subcellular localization without interference from the endogenously expressed protein. We show that several domains and m...
Subjects
free text keywords: Medicine, R, Science, Q, Research Article, General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology, General Agricultural and Biological Sciences, General Medicine, Chromatin, Subcellular localization, Nuclear protein, Cell biology, Ubiquitin ligase, biology.protein, biology, Nuclear localization sequence, Signal transducing adaptor protein, Cell nucleus, medicine.anatomical_structure, Nuclear export signal
Related Organizations
Funded by
CIHR
Project
  • Funder: Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
Download fromView all 4 versions
PLoS ONE
Article . 2015
PLoS ONE
Article . 2015
Provider: Crossref
PLoS ONE
Article
Provider: UnpayWall
67 references, page 1 of 5

1 Gorlich D, Kutay U (1999) TRANSPORT BETWEEN THE CELL NUCLEUS AND THE CYTOPLASM. Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology 15: 607–660. 10611974 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

2 Sorokin AV, Kim ER, Ovchinnikov LP (2007) Nucleocytoplasmic transport of proteins. Biochemistry (Mosc) 72: 1439–1457. 18282135 [PubMed]

3 Jans DA, Xiao CY, Lam MH (2000) Nuclear targeting signal recognition: a key control point in nuclear transport? Bioessays 22: 532–544. 10842307 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

4 Lange A, Mills RE, Lange CJ, Stewart M, Devine SE, et al (2007) Classical nuclear localization signals: definition, function, and interaction with importin alpha. J Biol Chem 282: 5101–5105. 17170104 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

5 Wagstaff KM, Jans DA (2009) Importins and beyond: non-conventional nuclear transport mechanisms. Traffic 10: 1188–1198. 10.1111/j.1600-0854.2009.00937.x 19548983 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

6 Perfetto L, Gherardini PF, Davey NE, Diella F, Helmer-Citterich M, et al (2013) Exploring the diversity of SPRY/B30.2-mediated interactions. Trends Biochem Sci 38: 38–46. 10.1016/j.tibs.2012.10.001 23164942 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

7 Gerlitz G, Darhin E, Giorgio G, Franco B, Reiner O (2005) Novel Functional Features of the LIS-H Domain: Role in Protein Dimerization, Half-Life and Cellular Localization. Cell Cycle 4: 1632–1640. 16258276 [PubMed]

8 Emes RD, Ponting CP (2001) A new sequence motif linking lissencephaly, Treacher Collins and oral-facial-digital type 1 syndromes, microtubule dynamics and cell migration. Hum Mol Genet 10: 2813–2820. 11734546 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

9 Mateja A, Cierpicki T, Paduch M, Derewenda ZS, Otlewski J (2006) The Dimerization Mechanism of LIS1 and its Implication for Proteins Containing the LisH Motif. J Mol Biol 357: 621–631. 16445939 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

10 Menon RP, Gibson TJ, Pastore A (2004) The C terminus of fragile X mental retardation protein interacts with the multi-domain Ran-binding protein in the microtubule-organising centre. J Mol Biol 343: 43–53. 15381419 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

11 Brunkhorst A, Karlen M, Shi J, Mikolajczyk M, Nelson MA, et al (2005) A specific role for the TFIID subunit TAF4 and RanBPM in neural progenitor differentiation. Mol Cell Neurosci 29: 250–258. 15911349 [PubMed]

12 Kramer S, Ozaki T, Miyazaki K, Kato C, Hanamoto T, et al (2005) Protein stability and function of p73 are modulated by a physical interaction with RanBPM in mammalian cultured cells. Oncogene 24: 938–944. 15558019 [PubMed]

13 Poirier M-B, Laflamme L, Langlois M-F (2006) Identification and characterization of RanBPM, a novel coactivator of thyroid hormone receptors. J Mol Endocrinol 36: 313–325. 16595702 [PubMed]

14 Rao MA, Cheng H, Quayle AN, Nishitani H, Nelson CC, et al (2002) RanBPM, a nuclear protein that interacts with and regulates transcriptional activity of androgen receptor and glucocorticoid receptor. J Biol Chem 277: 48020–48027. 12361945 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

15 Valiyaveettil M, Bentley AA, Gursahaney P, Hussien R, Chakravarti R, et al (2008) Novel role of the muskelin-RanBP9 complex as a nucleocytoplasmic mediator of cell morphology regulation. J Cell Biol 182: 727–739. 10.1083/jcb.200801133 18710924 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

67 references, page 1 of 5
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