publication . Article . 2019

Cat Colony Caretakers' Perceptions of Support and Opposition to TNR

Jacquie Rand; Jacquie Rand; Andrea Hayward; Kuan Tan;
Open Access English
  • Published: 01 Mar 2019 Journal: Frontiers in Veterinary Science, volume 6 (eissn: 2297-1769, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
Abstract
Trap, neuter and return (TNR) is a non-lethal approach to urban cat management used effectively internationally to decrease urban cat numbers, but deemed illegal in Australia. We investigated perceived support and opposition to TNR experienced by respondents involved in TNR activities, as individuals or through organizations. TNR was initiated to reduce cat numbers, as a humane way to manage community cats, and to improve cat welfare. Many respondents sought permission from local authorities, and all received verbal permission. Perceived attitudes of stakeholders, for example authorities and neighbors, were polarized, with some supporting it and others antagonis...
Subjects
free text keywords: Veterinary Science, Original Research, trap, neuter, return, community, cats, management, support, opposition, Veterinary medicine, SF600-1100, Subsidy, Legal action, Cash, media_common.quotation_subject, media_common, Welfare, Perception, Immunology, Biology, Public relations, business.industry, business, Opposition (planets)
Related Organizations
72 references, page 1 of 5

1.Kortis B Calculating Number of Unaltered Cats and/or Dogs in a Target Area (2012). Available online at: https://www.neighborhoodcats.org/resources/books-videos-more (Accessed November 20, 2017).

2.Tan K Rand J Morton J. Trap-neuter-return activities in urban stray cat colonies in Australia. Animals. (2017) 7:E46. 10.3390/ani7060046 28574465 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

3.Alberthsen C Rand JS Bennett PC Morton J Paterson M Lawrie M Cat admissions to RSPCA animal shelters in Queensland, Australia and the risk factors for euthanasia after entry. Aust Vet J. (2013) 91:35–42. 10.1111/avj.12013 23356370 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

4.Alberthsen C The Australian Excess Cat Population: An Exploration of Cat Admissions and Outcomes to RSPCA Shelters. Ph.D. University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (2014).

5.Kerr C Rand J Morton J Reid R Paterson M. Changes associated with improved outcomes for cats entering RSPCA Queensland shelters between 2011 and 2016. Animals. (2018) 8:95. 10.3390/ani8060095 29895814 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

6.Lazenby BT Mooney NJ Dickman CR Effects of low-level culling of feral cats in open populations: a case study from the forests of southern Tasmania. Wildl Res. (2015) 41:407–15. 10.1071/WR14030 [DOI]

7.Miller PS Boone JD Briggs JR Lawler DF Levy JK Nutter FB Simulating free-roaming cat population management options in open demographic environments. PLoS ONE. (2014) 10:e0119390 10.1371/journal.pone.0113553 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

8.Swarbrick H Rand J. Application of a Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) protocol to manage unowned urban cats on an Australian university campus. Animals. (2018) 8:E77. 10.3390/ani8050077 29772788 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

9.Doherty TS Dickman CR Jognson CN Legge SM Ritchie EG Woinarski JCZ Impacts and management of feral cats Felis catus in Australia. Mamm Rev. (2017) 47:83–96. 10.1111/mam.12080 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

10.Robertson S. A review of feral cat control. J Feline Med Surg. (2008) 10:366–75. 10.1016/j.jfms.2007.08.003 17913531 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

11.Uetake K Yamada S Yano M Tanaka T. A survey of attitudes of local citizens of a residential area toward urban stray cats in Japan. J Appl Anim Welf Sci. (2014) 17:172–7. 10.1080/10888705.2013.798558 23924029 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

12.Alley Cat Allies Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) (2017). Available online at: https://www.alleycat.org/our-work/trap-neuter-return/ (Accessed February 17, 2017).

13.Spehar DD Wolf PJ. An examination of an iconic trap-neuter-return program: the Newburyport, Massachusetts Case Study. Animals. (2017) 7:E81. 10.3390/ani7110081 29088106 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

14.Spehar DD Wolf PJ. A Case Study in Citizen Science: the effectiveness of a trap-neuter-return program in a Chicago neighborhood. Animals. (2018) 8:14. 10.3390/ani8010014 29346278 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

15.Spehar DD Wolf PJ. The impact of an integrated program of return-to-field and targeted trap-neuter-return on feline intake and euthanasia at a municipal animal shelter. Animals. (2018) 8:55. 10.3390/ani8040055 29652808 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

72 references, page 1 of 5
Abstract
Trap, neuter and return (TNR) is a non-lethal approach to urban cat management used effectively internationally to decrease urban cat numbers, but deemed illegal in Australia. We investigated perceived support and opposition to TNR experienced by respondents involved in TNR activities, as individuals or through organizations. TNR was initiated to reduce cat numbers, as a humane way to manage community cats, and to improve cat welfare. Many respondents sought permission from local authorities, and all received verbal permission. Perceived attitudes of stakeholders, for example authorities and neighbors, were polarized, with some supporting it and others antagonis...
Subjects
free text keywords: Veterinary Science, Original Research, trap, neuter, return, community, cats, management, support, opposition, Veterinary medicine, SF600-1100, Subsidy, Legal action, Cash, media_common.quotation_subject, media_common, Welfare, Perception, Immunology, Biology, Public relations, business.industry, business, Opposition (planets)
Related Organizations
72 references, page 1 of 5

1.Kortis B Calculating Number of Unaltered Cats and/or Dogs in a Target Area (2012). Available online at: https://www.neighborhoodcats.org/resources/books-videos-more (Accessed November 20, 2017).

2.Tan K Rand J Morton J. Trap-neuter-return activities in urban stray cat colonies in Australia. Animals. (2017) 7:E46. 10.3390/ani7060046 28574465 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

3.Alberthsen C Rand JS Bennett PC Morton J Paterson M Lawrie M Cat admissions to RSPCA animal shelters in Queensland, Australia and the risk factors for euthanasia after entry. Aust Vet J. (2013) 91:35–42. 10.1111/avj.12013 23356370 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

4.Alberthsen C The Australian Excess Cat Population: An Exploration of Cat Admissions and Outcomes to RSPCA Shelters. Ph.D. University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (2014).

5.Kerr C Rand J Morton J Reid R Paterson M. Changes associated with improved outcomes for cats entering RSPCA Queensland shelters between 2011 and 2016. Animals. (2018) 8:95. 10.3390/ani8060095 29895814 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

6.Lazenby BT Mooney NJ Dickman CR Effects of low-level culling of feral cats in open populations: a case study from the forests of southern Tasmania. Wildl Res. (2015) 41:407–15. 10.1071/WR14030 [DOI]

7.Miller PS Boone JD Briggs JR Lawler DF Levy JK Nutter FB Simulating free-roaming cat population management options in open demographic environments. PLoS ONE. (2014) 10:e0119390 10.1371/journal.pone.0113553 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

8.Swarbrick H Rand J. Application of a Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) protocol to manage unowned urban cats on an Australian university campus. Animals. (2018) 8:E77. 10.3390/ani8050077 29772788 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

9.Doherty TS Dickman CR Jognson CN Legge SM Ritchie EG Woinarski JCZ Impacts and management of feral cats Felis catus in Australia. Mamm Rev. (2017) 47:83–96. 10.1111/mam.12080 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

10.Robertson S. A review of feral cat control. J Feline Med Surg. (2008) 10:366–75. 10.1016/j.jfms.2007.08.003 17913531 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

11.Uetake K Yamada S Yano M Tanaka T. A survey of attitudes of local citizens of a residential area toward urban stray cats in Japan. J Appl Anim Welf Sci. (2014) 17:172–7. 10.1080/10888705.2013.798558 23924029 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

12.Alley Cat Allies Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) (2017). Available online at: https://www.alleycat.org/our-work/trap-neuter-return/ (Accessed February 17, 2017).

13.Spehar DD Wolf PJ. An examination of an iconic trap-neuter-return program: the Newburyport, Massachusetts Case Study. Animals. (2017) 7:E81. 10.3390/ani7110081 29088106 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

14.Spehar DD Wolf PJ. A Case Study in Citizen Science: the effectiveness of a trap-neuter-return program in a Chicago neighborhood. Animals. (2018) 8:14. 10.3390/ani8010014 29346278 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

15.Spehar DD Wolf PJ. The impact of an integrated program of return-to-field and targeted trap-neuter-return on feline intake and euthanasia at a municipal animal shelter. Animals. (2018) 8:55. 10.3390/ani8040055 29652808 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

72 references, page 1 of 5
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