publication . Article . Other literature type . 2014

The role of abiotic environmental conditions and herbivory in shaping bacterial community composition in floral nectar.

Ido Izhaki; Avi Bar-Massada; Sivan Laviad; Michal Samuni-Blank; Malka Halpern; Yoram Gerchman;
Open Access English
  • Published: 12 Jun 2014 Journal: PLoS ONE (issn: 1932-6203, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Abstract
None: Identifying the processes that drive community assembly has long been a central theme in ecology. For microorganisms, a traditional prevailing hypothesis states that "everything is everywhere, but the environment selects". Although the bacterial community in floral nectar may be affected by both atmosphere (air-borne bacteria) and animals as dispersal vectors, the environmental and geographic factors that shape microbial communities in floral nectar are unknown. We studied culturable bacterial communities in Asphodelus aestivus floral nectar and in its typical herbivorous bug Capsodes infuscatus, along an aridity gradient. Bacteria were sampled from floral...
Subjects
Medical Subject Headings: food and beveragesfungi
free text keywords: Medicine, R, Science, Q, Research Article, Biology and Life Sciences, Biotechnology, Applied Microbiology, Ecology, Microbial Ecology, Microbiology, Ecology and Environmental Sciences, General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology, General Agricultural and Biological Sciences, General Medicine, Abiotic component, Nectar, Botany, Biological dispersal, Plant Nectar, Community, Biology, Hemiptera, biology.organism_classification, Niche, Herbivore
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59 references, page 1 of 4

1 Clements FE (1916) Plant succession: An analysis of the development of vegetation. Carnegie Institution of Washington, USA.

2 Gleason HA (1926) The individualistic concept of the plant association. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 53: 7–26. [OpenAIRE]

3 Hutchinson GE (1991) Population stud ies: Animal ecology and demography. Bulletin of Mathematical Biology 53: 193–213.

4 MacArthur RH (1967) The theory of island biogeography. Princeton University Press.

5 Hubbell SP (2001) The unified neutral theory of biodiversity and biogeography (MPB-32). Princeton University Press.

6 Chesson P (2000) Mechanisms of maintenance of species diversity. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 31: 343–366. [OpenAIRE]

7 Silvertown J (2004) Plant coexistence and the niche. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 19: 605–611. [OpenAIRE]

8 Levine JM, HilleRisLambers J (2009) The importance of niches for the maintenance of species diversity. Nature 461: 254–257.19675568 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

9 Leibold MA, Holyoak M, Mouquet N, Amarasekare P, Chase JM, et al (2004) The metacommunity concept: A framework for multi-scale community ecology. Ecology Letters 7: 601–613. [OpenAIRE]

10 Tilman D (2004) Niche tradeoffs, neutrality, and community structure: A stochastic theory of resource competition, invasion, and community assembly. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 101: 10854–10861.15243158 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

11 LalibertéE, Paquette A, Legendre P, Bouchard A (2009) Assessing the scale-specific importance of niches and other spatial processes on beta diversity: A case study from a temperate forest. Oecologia 159: 377–388.19018575 [PubMed]

12 Chase J, Myers JA (2011) Disentangling the importance of ecological niches from stochastic processes across scales. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 366: 2351–2363.

13 Emerson BC, Gillespie RG (2008) Phylogenetic analysis of community assembly and structure over space and time. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 23: 619–630.18823678 [PubMed]

14 Vamosi S, Heard S, Vamosi J, Webb C (2009) Emerging patterns in the comparative analysis of phylogenetic community structure. Molecular Ecology 18: 572–592.19037898 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

15 Becking LB (1934) Geobiologie of inleiding tot de milieukunde. WP Van Stockum, Zoon.

59 references, page 1 of 4
Abstract
None: Identifying the processes that drive community assembly has long been a central theme in ecology. For microorganisms, a traditional prevailing hypothesis states that "everything is everywhere, but the environment selects". Although the bacterial community in floral nectar may be affected by both atmosphere (air-borne bacteria) and animals as dispersal vectors, the environmental and geographic factors that shape microbial communities in floral nectar are unknown. We studied culturable bacterial communities in Asphodelus aestivus floral nectar and in its typical herbivorous bug Capsodes infuscatus, along an aridity gradient. Bacteria were sampled from floral...
Subjects
Medical Subject Headings: food and beveragesfungi
free text keywords: Medicine, R, Science, Q, Research Article, Biology and Life Sciences, Biotechnology, Applied Microbiology, Ecology, Microbial Ecology, Microbiology, Ecology and Environmental Sciences, General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology, General Agricultural and Biological Sciences, General Medicine, Abiotic component, Nectar, Botany, Biological dispersal, Plant Nectar, Community, Biology, Hemiptera, biology.organism_classification, Niche, Herbivore
Related Organizations
Download fromView all 5 versions
PLoS ONE
Article . 2014
PLoS ONE
Article . 2014
Provider: Crossref
PLoS ONE
Article
Provider: UnpayWall
59 references, page 1 of 4

1 Clements FE (1916) Plant succession: An analysis of the development of vegetation. Carnegie Institution of Washington, USA.

2 Gleason HA (1926) The individualistic concept of the plant association. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 53: 7–26. [OpenAIRE]

3 Hutchinson GE (1991) Population stud ies: Animal ecology and demography. Bulletin of Mathematical Biology 53: 193–213.

4 MacArthur RH (1967) The theory of island biogeography. Princeton University Press.

5 Hubbell SP (2001) The unified neutral theory of biodiversity and biogeography (MPB-32). Princeton University Press.

6 Chesson P (2000) Mechanisms of maintenance of species diversity. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 31: 343–366. [OpenAIRE]

7 Silvertown J (2004) Plant coexistence and the niche. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 19: 605–611. [OpenAIRE]

8 Levine JM, HilleRisLambers J (2009) The importance of niches for the maintenance of species diversity. Nature 461: 254–257.19675568 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

9 Leibold MA, Holyoak M, Mouquet N, Amarasekare P, Chase JM, et al (2004) The metacommunity concept: A framework for multi-scale community ecology. Ecology Letters 7: 601–613. [OpenAIRE]

10 Tilman D (2004) Niche tradeoffs, neutrality, and community structure: A stochastic theory of resource competition, invasion, and community assembly. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 101: 10854–10861.15243158 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

11 LalibertéE, Paquette A, Legendre P, Bouchard A (2009) Assessing the scale-specific importance of niches and other spatial processes on beta diversity: A case study from a temperate forest. Oecologia 159: 377–388.19018575 [PubMed]

12 Chase J, Myers JA (2011) Disentangling the importance of ecological niches from stochastic processes across scales. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 366: 2351–2363.

13 Emerson BC, Gillespie RG (2008) Phylogenetic analysis of community assembly and structure over space and time. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 23: 619–630.18823678 [PubMed]

14 Vamosi S, Heard S, Vamosi J, Webb C (2009) Emerging patterns in the comparative analysis of phylogenetic community structure. Molecular Ecology 18: 572–592.19037898 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

15 Becking LB (1934) Geobiologie of inleiding tot de milieukunde. WP Van Stockum, Zoon.

59 references, page 1 of 4
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