publication . Article . Other literature type . 2016

Microbial diversity in the floral nectar of Linaria vulgaris along an urbanization gradient

Hans Jacquemyn; Bart Lievens; Olivier Honnay; Jacek Bartlewicz;
Open Access
  • Published: 30 Mar 2016 Journal: BMC Ecology, volume 16 (eissn: 1472-6785, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
  • Country: Belgium
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Microbes are common inhabitants of floral nectar and are capable of influencing plant-pollinator interactions. All studies so far investigated microbial communities in floral nectar in plant populations that were located in natural environments, but nothing is known about these communities in nectar of plants inhabiting urban environments. However, at least some microbes are vectored into floral nectar by pollinators, and because urbanization can have a profound impact on pollinator communities and plant-pollinator interactions, it can be expected that it affects nectar microbes as well. To test this hypothesis, we related microbial diversity in flor...
Subjects
Medical Subject Headings: food and beveragesfungi
free text keywords: Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics, General Environmental Science, Environmental Science(all), Research Article, Nectar yeasts, Urbanization, Acinetobacter, Nectar microbial communities, Linaria vulgaris, Nectar, Metschnikowia, food.ingredient, food, Botany, Ecology, Pollinator, Nestedness, Biology, Plant Nectar, Nectar source, Linaria, biology.organism_classification, Biodiversity
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49 references, page 1 of 4

De Vega, C, Herrera, CM, Johnson, SD. Yeasts in floral nectar of some South African plants: quantification and associations with pollinator type and sugar concentration. S Afr J Bot. 2009; 75: 798-806 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Herrera, CM, De Vega, C, Canto, A, Pozo, M. Yeasts in floral nectar: a quantitative survey. Ann Botany. 2009; 103: 1415-1423 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Golonka, AM, Vilgalys, R. Nectar inhabiting yeasts in Virginian populations of Silene latifolia (Caryophyllaceae) and coflowering species. Am Mid Nat. 2013; 169: 235-258 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Alvarez-Pérez, S, Herrera, CM, De Vega, C. Zooming-in on floral nectar: a first exploration of nectar-associated bacteria in wild plant communities. FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2012; 80: 591-602 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Jacquemyn, H, Lenaerts, M, Brys, R, Willems, K, Honnay, O, Lievens, B. Among-population variation in microbial community structure in the floral nectar of the bee-pollinated forest herb Pulmonaria officinalis L. PLoS ONE. 2013; 8: e56917 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Jacquemyn, H, Lenaerts, M, Tyteca, D, Lievens, B. Microbial diversity in the floral nectar of seven Epipactis (Orchidaceae) species. Microbiol Open. 2013; 2: 644-658 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Lievens, B, Hallsworth, JE, Pozo, MI, Belgacem, ZB, Stevenson, A, Willems, KA, Jacquemyn, H. Microbiology of sugar-rich environments: diversity, ecology and system constraints. Environ Microbiol. 2015; 17: 278-298 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Pozo, MI, Lievens, B, Jacquemyn, H, Peck, RL. Impact of microorganisms on nectar chemistry, pollinator attraction and plant fitness. Nectar: production, chemical composition and benefits to animals and plants. 2015: 1-45

Peay, KG, Belisle, M, Fukami, T. Phylogenetic relatedness predicts priority effects in nectar yeast communities. Proc Biol Sci. 2012; 279: 749-758 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Herrera, CM, Garcia, IM, Perez, R. Invisible floral larcenies: microbial communities degrade floral nectar of bumble bee-pollinated plants. Ecology. 2008; 89: 2369-2376 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Goodrich, KR, Zjhra, ML, Ley, CA, Raguso, RA. When flowers smell fermented: the chemistry and ontogeny of yeasty floral scent in pawpaw (Asimina triloba : Annonaceae). Int J Plant Sci. 2006; 167: 33-46 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Pozo, MI, De Vega, C, Canto, A, Herrera, CM. Presence of yeasts in floral nectar is consistent with the hypothesis of microbial-mediated signaling in plant-pollinator interactions. Plant Signal Behav. 2009; 4: 1102-1104 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Herrera, CM, Pozo, MI. Nectar yeasts warm the flowers of a winter-blooming plant. Proc R Soc Lond. 2010; 277: 1827-1834 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Schaeffer, RN, Irwin, RE. Yeasts in nectar enhance male fitness in a montane perennial herb. Ecology. 2014; 95: 1792-1798 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Vannette, RL, Gauthier, M-PL, Fukami, T. Nectar bacteria, but not yeast, weaken a plant–pollinator mutualism. Proc Biol Sci. 2013; 280: 20122601 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

49 references, page 1 of 4
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Microbes are common inhabitants of floral nectar and are capable of influencing plant-pollinator interactions. All studies so far investigated microbial communities in floral nectar in plant populations that were located in natural environments, but nothing is known about these communities in nectar of plants inhabiting urban environments. However, at least some microbes are vectored into floral nectar by pollinators, and because urbanization can have a profound impact on pollinator communities and plant-pollinator interactions, it can be expected that it affects nectar microbes as well. To test this hypothesis, we related microbial diversity in flor...
Subjects
Medical Subject Headings: food and beveragesfungi
free text keywords: Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics, General Environmental Science, Environmental Science(all), Research Article, Nectar yeasts, Urbanization, Acinetobacter, Nectar microbial communities, Linaria vulgaris, Nectar, Metschnikowia, food.ingredient, food, Botany, Ecology, Pollinator, Nestedness, Biology, Plant Nectar, Nectar source, Linaria, biology.organism_classification, Biodiversity
Related Organizations
Download fromView all 5 versions
BMC Ecology
Article . 2016
Provider: Crossref
BMC Ecology
Article
Provider: UnpayWall
Lirias
Article . 2016
Provider: Lirias
49 references, page 1 of 4

De Vega, C, Herrera, CM, Johnson, SD. Yeasts in floral nectar of some South African plants: quantification and associations with pollinator type and sugar concentration. S Afr J Bot. 2009; 75: 798-806 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Herrera, CM, De Vega, C, Canto, A, Pozo, M. Yeasts in floral nectar: a quantitative survey. Ann Botany. 2009; 103: 1415-1423 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Golonka, AM, Vilgalys, R. Nectar inhabiting yeasts in Virginian populations of Silene latifolia (Caryophyllaceae) and coflowering species. Am Mid Nat. 2013; 169: 235-258 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Alvarez-Pérez, S, Herrera, CM, De Vega, C. Zooming-in on floral nectar: a first exploration of nectar-associated bacteria in wild plant communities. FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2012; 80: 591-602 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Jacquemyn, H, Lenaerts, M, Brys, R, Willems, K, Honnay, O, Lievens, B. Among-population variation in microbial community structure in the floral nectar of the bee-pollinated forest herb Pulmonaria officinalis L. PLoS ONE. 2013; 8: e56917 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Jacquemyn, H, Lenaerts, M, Tyteca, D, Lievens, B. Microbial diversity in the floral nectar of seven Epipactis (Orchidaceae) species. Microbiol Open. 2013; 2: 644-658 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Lievens, B, Hallsworth, JE, Pozo, MI, Belgacem, ZB, Stevenson, A, Willems, KA, Jacquemyn, H. Microbiology of sugar-rich environments: diversity, ecology and system constraints. Environ Microbiol. 2015; 17: 278-298 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Pozo, MI, Lievens, B, Jacquemyn, H, Peck, RL. Impact of microorganisms on nectar chemistry, pollinator attraction and plant fitness. Nectar: production, chemical composition and benefits to animals and plants. 2015: 1-45

Peay, KG, Belisle, M, Fukami, T. Phylogenetic relatedness predicts priority effects in nectar yeast communities. Proc Biol Sci. 2012; 279: 749-758 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Herrera, CM, Garcia, IM, Perez, R. Invisible floral larcenies: microbial communities degrade floral nectar of bumble bee-pollinated plants. Ecology. 2008; 89: 2369-2376 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Goodrich, KR, Zjhra, ML, Ley, CA, Raguso, RA. When flowers smell fermented: the chemistry and ontogeny of yeasty floral scent in pawpaw (Asimina triloba : Annonaceae). Int J Plant Sci. 2006; 167: 33-46 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Pozo, MI, De Vega, C, Canto, A, Herrera, CM. Presence of yeasts in floral nectar is consistent with the hypothesis of microbial-mediated signaling in plant-pollinator interactions. Plant Signal Behav. 2009; 4: 1102-1104 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Herrera, CM, Pozo, MI. Nectar yeasts warm the flowers of a winter-blooming plant. Proc R Soc Lond. 2010; 277: 1827-1834 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Schaeffer, RN, Irwin, RE. Yeasts in nectar enhance male fitness in a montane perennial herb. Ecology. 2014; 95: 1792-1798 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Vannette, RL, Gauthier, M-PL, Fukami, T. Nectar bacteria, but not yeast, weaken a plant–pollinator mutualism. Proc Biol Sci. 2013; 280: 20122601 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

49 references, page 1 of 4
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