publication . Article . 2012

Radiocarbon reservoir effects in human bone collagen from northern Iceland

Ascough, P.L.; Church, M.J.; Cook, G.T.; Dunbar, E.; Gestsdóttir, H.; McGovern, T.H.; Dugmore, A.J.; Friðriksson, A.; Edwards, K.J.;
Open Access English
  • Published: 01 Jul 2012
  • Publisher: Elsevier
  • Country: United Kingdom
Abstract
Human bone collagen from a series of Icelandic human pagan graves was radiocarbon (14C) dated to aid understanding of early settlement (landnam) chronologies in northern Iceland. These individuals potentially consumed marine protein. The 14C age of samples containing marine carbon requires a correction for the marine 14C reservoir effect. The proportion of non-terrestrial sample carbon was quantified via measurement of carbon stable isotopes (δ13C) using a simple mixing model, based on δ13C measurements of archaeofaunal samples. Non-terrestrial carbon was also quantified in six pig bones from the archaeofaunal dataset. Assuming all non-terrestrial carbon in huma...
Subjects
free text keywords: Radiocarbon reservoir effect, freshwater, marine, Iceland, Pagan grave, Archaeology, History
Related Organizations
Funded by
NSF| IPY: Long Term Human Ecodynamics in the Norse North Atlantic: cases of sustainability, survival, and collapse.
Project
  • Funder: National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • Project Code: 0732327
  • Funding stream: Directorate for Geosciences | Division of Polar Programs
Communities
European Marine Science
Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
26 references, page 1 of 2

2007. Abandoned farms, volcanic impacts, and woodland management: Revisting Þjórsárdalur, the “Pompeii of Iceland.” Arctic Anthropology 44, 1-11.

Edvardsson, R., McGovern, T.H., 2007. Hrísheimar 2006: Interim report. Unpublished North Atlantic Biocultural Organisation Field Report (Available for download from http://www.nabohome.org/publications/fieldreports/fieldreports.html).

Edwards, K.J., Buckland, P.C., Dugmore, A.J., McGovern, T.H., Simpson, I.A., Sveinbjarnardóttir, G. 2004. Landscapes circum-landnám: Viking settlement in the North Atlantic and its human and ecological consequences: a major new research programme. In: Housley, R., Coles, G.M. (Eds.), Atlantic Connections and Adaptations: Economies, Environments and Subsistence in Lands Bordering the North Atlantic. Oxford: Oxbow, Oxford, pp. 260-271.

Einarsson, B.F. 1994. The Settlement of Iceland: A Critical Approach: Granastaðir and the Ecological Heritage. Series B Gothenburg Archaeological Theses, 4. Gothenberg University Press, Gothenberg, Sweden. [OpenAIRE]

Eldjárn, K. 1948. Gengið á reka. Tólf fornleifaÞaettir. Bókaútgáfan Norðri, Akureyri.

2007. Coast-inland mobility and diet in the Danish Mesolithic and Neolithic: evidence from stable isotope values of humans and dogs. Journal of Archaeological Science 34, 2125-2150.

Gestsdóttir, H. 1998. Kyn og lífaldursgreiningar á beinum úr íslenskum kumlum. Reykjavík, Fornleifastofnun Íslands. FS055-98151.

Greenfield, H. J. 1988. Special Studies: Bone Consumption by Pigs in a Contemporary Serbian Village: Implications for the Interpretation of Prehistoric Faunal Assemblages.

Journal of Field Archaeology 15, 473-479.

1995. Tephra layers from Iceland in the Greenland GRIP ice core correlated with oceanic and land-based sediments. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 135, 149-155.

Hamilton, J., Hedges, R.E.M., Robinson, M. 2009. Rooting for pigfruit: pig feeding in Neolithic and Iron Age Britain compared. Antiquity 83, 998-1011.

Richards, M.P., Sheridan, J.A. 2000. New AMS dates on human bone from Mesolithic Oronsay. Antiquity 74, 313-315.

Roberts, H. M. 2008. Journey to the dead. The Litlu-Núpar boat burial. Current World Archaeology 32, 36-41.

Russell, N., Cook, G.T., Ascough, P.L., Barrett, J.H., Dugmore, A.J. 2011. Species specific Marine Radiocarbon Reservoir Effect: A comparison of ΔR values between Patella vulgata (limpet) shell carbonate and Gadus morhua (Atlantic cod) bone collagen. Journal of Archaeological Science 38, 1008-1015. [OpenAIRE]

Schoeninger, M.J., DeNiro, M.J. 1984. Nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition of bone collagen from marine and terrestrial animals. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 48, 625-639. [OpenAIRE]

26 references, page 1 of 2
Abstract
Human bone collagen from a series of Icelandic human pagan graves was radiocarbon (14C) dated to aid understanding of early settlement (landnam) chronologies in northern Iceland. These individuals potentially consumed marine protein. The 14C age of samples containing marine carbon requires a correction for the marine 14C reservoir effect. The proportion of non-terrestrial sample carbon was quantified via measurement of carbon stable isotopes (δ13C) using a simple mixing model, based on δ13C measurements of archaeofaunal samples. Non-terrestrial carbon was also quantified in six pig bones from the archaeofaunal dataset. Assuming all non-terrestrial carbon in huma...
Subjects
free text keywords: Radiocarbon reservoir effect, freshwater, marine, Iceland, Pagan grave, Archaeology, History
Related Organizations
Funded by
NSF| IPY: Long Term Human Ecodynamics in the Norse North Atlantic: cases of sustainability, survival, and collapse.
Project
  • Funder: National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • Project Code: 0732327
  • Funding stream: Directorate for Geosciences | Division of Polar Programs
Communities
European Marine Science
Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
26 references, page 1 of 2

2007. Abandoned farms, volcanic impacts, and woodland management: Revisting Þjórsárdalur, the “Pompeii of Iceland.” Arctic Anthropology 44, 1-11.

Edvardsson, R., McGovern, T.H., 2007. Hrísheimar 2006: Interim report. Unpublished North Atlantic Biocultural Organisation Field Report (Available for download from http://www.nabohome.org/publications/fieldreports/fieldreports.html).

Edwards, K.J., Buckland, P.C., Dugmore, A.J., McGovern, T.H., Simpson, I.A., Sveinbjarnardóttir, G. 2004. Landscapes circum-landnám: Viking settlement in the North Atlantic and its human and ecological consequences: a major new research programme. In: Housley, R., Coles, G.M. (Eds.), Atlantic Connections and Adaptations: Economies, Environments and Subsistence in Lands Bordering the North Atlantic. Oxford: Oxbow, Oxford, pp. 260-271.

Einarsson, B.F. 1994. The Settlement of Iceland: A Critical Approach: Granastaðir and the Ecological Heritage. Series B Gothenburg Archaeological Theses, 4. Gothenberg University Press, Gothenberg, Sweden. [OpenAIRE]

Eldjárn, K. 1948. Gengið á reka. Tólf fornleifaÞaettir. Bókaútgáfan Norðri, Akureyri.

2007. Coast-inland mobility and diet in the Danish Mesolithic and Neolithic: evidence from stable isotope values of humans and dogs. Journal of Archaeological Science 34, 2125-2150.

Gestsdóttir, H. 1998. Kyn og lífaldursgreiningar á beinum úr íslenskum kumlum. Reykjavík, Fornleifastofnun Íslands. FS055-98151.

Greenfield, H. J. 1988. Special Studies: Bone Consumption by Pigs in a Contemporary Serbian Village: Implications for the Interpretation of Prehistoric Faunal Assemblages.

Journal of Field Archaeology 15, 473-479.

1995. Tephra layers from Iceland in the Greenland GRIP ice core correlated with oceanic and land-based sediments. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 135, 149-155.

Hamilton, J., Hedges, R.E.M., Robinson, M. 2009. Rooting for pigfruit: pig feeding in Neolithic and Iron Age Britain compared. Antiquity 83, 998-1011.

Richards, M.P., Sheridan, J.A. 2000. New AMS dates on human bone from Mesolithic Oronsay. Antiquity 74, 313-315.

Roberts, H. M. 2008. Journey to the dead. The Litlu-Núpar boat burial. Current World Archaeology 32, 36-41.

Russell, N., Cook, G.T., Ascough, P.L., Barrett, J.H., Dugmore, A.J. 2011. Species specific Marine Radiocarbon Reservoir Effect: A comparison of ΔR values between Patella vulgata (limpet) shell carbonate and Gadus morhua (Atlantic cod) bone collagen. Journal of Archaeological Science 38, 1008-1015. [OpenAIRE]

Schoeninger, M.J., DeNiro, M.J. 1984. Nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition of bone collagen from marine and terrestrial animals. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 48, 625-639. [OpenAIRE]

26 references, page 1 of 2
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