publication . Other literature type . Article . Preprint . 2017

Statistical physics of human cooperation

Matjaž Perc; Jillian J. Jordan; David G. Rand; Zhen Wang; Stefano Boccaletti; Attila Szolnoki;
Open Access
  • Published: 19 May 2017
  • Publisher: Elsevier BV
Abstract
Extensive cooperation among unrelated individuals is unique to humans, who often sacrifice personal benefits for the common good and work together to achieve what they are unable to execute alone. The evolutionary success of our species is indeed due, to a large degree, to our unparalleled other-regarding abilities. Yet, a comprehensive understanding of human cooperation remains a formidable challenge. Recent research in social science indicates that it is important to focus on the collective behavior that emerges as the result of the interactions among individuals, groups, and even societies. Non-equilibrium statistical physics, in particular Monte Carlo method...
Persistent Identifiers
Subjects
free text keywords: General Physics and Astronomy, Physics - Physics and Society, Condensed Matter - Statistical Mechanics, Computer Science - Social and Information Networks, Nonlinear Sciences - Adaptation and Self-Organizing Systems, Quantitative Biology - Populations and Evolution, Statistical physics, Physics, Game theory, Counterintuitive, Collective behavior, Physical system, Self-organization, Evolutionary game theory, Pairwise comparison, Common good
295 references, page 1 of 20

[1] R. H. Peters, The ecological implications of body size, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1983.

[2] W. A. Calder, Size, function, and life history, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, MA, 1984.

[3] S. B. Hrdy, Mothers and Others: The Evolutionary Origins of Mutual Understanding, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 2011.

[4] S. Bowles, H. Gintis, A Cooperative Species: Human Reciprocity and Its Evolution, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 2011.

[5] R. Axelrod, The Evolution of Cooperation, Basic Books, New York, 1984.

[6] M. A. Nowak, R. Highfield, SuperCooperators: Altruism, Evolution, and Why We Need Each Other to Succeed, Free Press, New York, 2011.

[7] M. Perc, Self-organization of progress across the century of physics, Sci. Rep. 3.

[8] R. Sinatra, P. Deville, M. Szell, D. Wang, A.-L. Baraba´si, A century of physics, Nature Physics 11 (2015) 791-796.

[9] Y. Arthus-Bertrand, Human (movie), Bettencourt Schueller Foundation, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, 2014.

[10] S. Pinker, The Better Angels of our Nature: Why Wiolence has Declined, Viking, New York, 2011.

[11] E. Pennisi, How did cooperative behavior evolve, Science 309 (2005) 93-93. [OpenAIRE]

[12] D. Kennedy, C. Norman, What don't we know?, Science 309 (2005) 75-75.

[13] C. Castellano, S. Fortunato, V. Loreto, Statistical physics of social dynamics, Rev. Mod. Phys. 81 (2009) 591-646.

[14] G. Szabo´, G. Fa´th, Evolutionary games on graphs, Phys. Rep. 446 (2007) 97-216.

[15] M. Perc, A. Szolnoki, Coevolutionary games - a mini review, BioSystems 99 (2010) 109-125.

295 references, page 1 of 20
Abstract
Extensive cooperation among unrelated individuals is unique to humans, who often sacrifice personal benefits for the common good and work together to achieve what they are unable to execute alone. The evolutionary success of our species is indeed due, to a large degree, to our unparalleled other-regarding abilities. Yet, a comprehensive understanding of human cooperation remains a formidable challenge. Recent research in social science indicates that it is important to focus on the collective behavior that emerges as the result of the interactions among individuals, groups, and even societies. Non-equilibrium statistical physics, in particular Monte Carlo method...
Persistent Identifiers
Subjects
free text keywords: General Physics and Astronomy, Physics - Physics and Society, Condensed Matter - Statistical Mechanics, Computer Science - Social and Information Networks, Nonlinear Sciences - Adaptation and Self-Organizing Systems, Quantitative Biology - Populations and Evolution, Statistical physics, Physics, Game theory, Counterintuitive, Collective behavior, Physical system, Self-organization, Evolutionary game theory, Pairwise comparison, Common good
295 references, page 1 of 20

[1] R. H. Peters, The ecological implications of body size, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1983.

[2] W. A. Calder, Size, function, and life history, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, MA, 1984.

[3] S. B. Hrdy, Mothers and Others: The Evolutionary Origins of Mutual Understanding, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 2011.

[4] S. Bowles, H. Gintis, A Cooperative Species: Human Reciprocity and Its Evolution, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 2011.

[5] R. Axelrod, The Evolution of Cooperation, Basic Books, New York, 1984.

[6] M. A. Nowak, R. Highfield, SuperCooperators: Altruism, Evolution, and Why We Need Each Other to Succeed, Free Press, New York, 2011.

[7] M. Perc, Self-organization of progress across the century of physics, Sci. Rep. 3.

[8] R. Sinatra, P. Deville, M. Szell, D. Wang, A.-L. Baraba´si, A century of physics, Nature Physics 11 (2015) 791-796.

[9] Y. Arthus-Bertrand, Human (movie), Bettencourt Schueller Foundation, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, 2014.

[10] S. Pinker, The Better Angels of our Nature: Why Wiolence has Declined, Viking, New York, 2011.

[11] E. Pennisi, How did cooperative behavior evolve, Science 309 (2005) 93-93. [OpenAIRE]

[12] D. Kennedy, C. Norman, What don't we know?, Science 309 (2005) 75-75.

[13] C. Castellano, S. Fortunato, V. Loreto, Statistical physics of social dynamics, Rev. Mod. Phys. 81 (2009) 591-646.

[14] G. Szabo´, G. Fa´th, Evolutionary games on graphs, Phys. Rep. 446 (2007) 97-216.

[15] M. Perc, A. Szolnoki, Coevolutionary games - a mini review, BioSystems 99 (2010) 109-125.

295 references, page 1 of 20
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