publication . Article . Other literature type . 2019

Effect of Bacillus subtilis Strains on Intestinal Barrier Function and Inflammatory Response

Erik Eckhardt; Nicoletti Cendrine; Lamya Rhayat; marc maresca;
Open Access English
  • Published: 01 Mar 2019 Journal: Frontiers in Immunology, volume 10 (eissn: 1664-3224, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
Abstract
Strong tight junctions and curtailed inflammatory responses under stressful conditions are key for optimal digestive health. Bacillus-based probiotics are increasingly being used to maintain broilers' health, but their mode of action is often not well-defined. In the present study we used Caco-2 cells as a model for intestinal epithelia and assessed the effect of three Bacillus-based probiotics on intestinal barrier function and intestinal inflammation. Experimental results showed that one of the three tested strains, Bs 29784, significantly reinforced intestinal barrier integrity under basal conditions through an up-regulation of the expression of tight junctio...
Subjects
free text keywords: Immunology, Original Research, Bacillus subtilis, probiotics, digestive health, intestinal epithelium, inflammation, IL-8, NF-κB, tight junctions, Immunologic diseases. Allergy, RC581-607
Related Organizations
53 references, page 1 of 4

1.Sommer F Bäckhed F. The gut microbiota–masters of host development and physiology. Nat Rev Microbiol. (2013) 11:227–38. 10.1038/nrmicro2974 23435359 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

2.Peterson LW Artis D. Intestinal epithelial cells: regulators of barrier function and immune homeostasis. Nat Rev Immunol. (2014) 14:141–53. 10.1038/nri3608 24566914 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

3.Mukherjee S Hooper LV. Antimicrobial defense of the intestine. Immunity. (2015) 42:28–39. 10.1016/j.immuni.2014.12.028 25607457 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

4.Ulluwishewa D Anderson RC McNabb WC Moughan PJ Wells JM Roy NC. Regulation of tight junction permeability by intestinal bacteria and dietary components. J Nutr. (2011) 141:769–76. 10.3945/jn.110.135657 21430248 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

5.Zeissig S Bürgel N Günzel D Richter J Mankertz J Wahnschaffe U. Changes in expression and distribution of claudin 2, 5 and 8 lead to discontinuous tight junctions and barrier dysfunction in active Crohn's disease. Gut. (2007) 56:61–72. 10.1136/gut.2006.094375 16822808 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

6.Antonissen G van Immerseel F Pasmans F Ducatelle R Haesebrouck F Timbermont L. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol predisposes for the development of Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. PLOS ONE. (2014) 9:e108775. 10.1371/journal.pone.0108775 25268498 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

7.Eichner M Augustin C Fromm A Piontek A Walther W Bücker R. In colon epithelia, Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin causes focal leaks by targeting claudins which are apically accessible due to tight junction derangement. J Infect Dis. (2017) 217:147–57. 10.1093/infdis/jix485 28968861 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

8.Capaldo CT Nusrat A. Cytokine regulation of tight junctions. Biochimica et biophysica acta. (2009) 1788:864–71. 10.1016/j.bbamem.2008.08.027 18952050 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

9.Pasparakis M. IKK/NF-kappaB signaling in intestinal epithelial cells controls immune homeostasis in the gut. Mucosal Immunol. (2008) 1(Suppl.)1:S54–7. 10.1038/mi.2008.53 19079232 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

10.Kaetzel CS. The polymeric immunoglobulin receptor: bridging innate and adaptive immune responses at mucosal surfaces. Immunol Rev. (2005) 206:83–99. 10.1111/j.0105-2896.2005.00278.x 16048543 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

11.Becker S Oelschlaeger TA Wullaert A Pasparakis M Wehkamp J Stange EF. Bacteria regulate intestinal epithelial cell differentiation factors both in vitro and in vivo. PLOS ONE. (2013) 8:e55620. 10.1371/journal.pone.0055620 23418 447 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

12.Eckmann L Jung H Schuerer-Maly C Panja A Morzycka-Wroblewska E Kagnoff MF. Differential cytokine expression by human intestinal epithelial cell lines: regulated expression of interleukin-8. Gastroenterology. (1993) 105:1689–97. 10.1016/0016-5085(93)91064-O 8253345 [PubMed] [DOI]

13.Gewirtz AT Navas TA Lyons S Godowski PJ Madara JL. Cutting edge: bacterial flagellin activates basolaterally expressed TLR5 to induce epithelial proinflammatory gene expression. J Immunol. (2001) 167:1882–5. 10.4049/jimmunol.167.4.1882 11489966 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

14.Maresca M Yahi N Younès-Sakr L Boyron M Caporiccio B Fantini J. Both direct and indirect effects account for the pro-inflammatory activity of enteropathogenic mycotoxins on the human intestinal epithelium: stimulation of interleukin-8 secretion, potentiation of interleukin-1beta effect and increase in the transepithelial passage of commensal bacteria. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. (2008) 228:84–92. 10.1016/j.taap.2007.11.013 18308354 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

15.Ramos HC Rumbo M Sirard J-C. Bacterial flagellins: mediators of pathogenicity and host immune responses in mucosa. Trends Microbiol. (2004) 12:509–17. 10.1016/j.tim.2004.09.002 15488392 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

53 references, page 1 of 4
Abstract
Strong tight junctions and curtailed inflammatory responses under stressful conditions are key for optimal digestive health. Bacillus-based probiotics are increasingly being used to maintain broilers' health, but their mode of action is often not well-defined. In the present study we used Caco-2 cells as a model for intestinal epithelia and assessed the effect of three Bacillus-based probiotics on intestinal barrier function and intestinal inflammation. Experimental results showed that one of the three tested strains, Bs 29784, significantly reinforced intestinal barrier integrity under basal conditions through an up-regulation of the expression of tight junctio...
Subjects
free text keywords: Immunology, Original Research, Bacillus subtilis, probiotics, digestive health, intestinal epithelium, inflammation, IL-8, NF-κB, tight junctions, Immunologic diseases. Allergy, RC581-607
Related Organizations
53 references, page 1 of 4

1.Sommer F Bäckhed F. The gut microbiota–masters of host development and physiology. Nat Rev Microbiol. (2013) 11:227–38. 10.1038/nrmicro2974 23435359 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

2.Peterson LW Artis D. Intestinal epithelial cells: regulators of barrier function and immune homeostasis. Nat Rev Immunol. (2014) 14:141–53. 10.1038/nri3608 24566914 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

3.Mukherjee S Hooper LV. Antimicrobial defense of the intestine. Immunity. (2015) 42:28–39. 10.1016/j.immuni.2014.12.028 25607457 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

4.Ulluwishewa D Anderson RC McNabb WC Moughan PJ Wells JM Roy NC. Regulation of tight junction permeability by intestinal bacteria and dietary components. J Nutr. (2011) 141:769–76. 10.3945/jn.110.135657 21430248 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

5.Zeissig S Bürgel N Günzel D Richter J Mankertz J Wahnschaffe U. Changes in expression and distribution of claudin 2, 5 and 8 lead to discontinuous tight junctions and barrier dysfunction in active Crohn's disease. Gut. (2007) 56:61–72. 10.1136/gut.2006.094375 16822808 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

6.Antonissen G van Immerseel F Pasmans F Ducatelle R Haesebrouck F Timbermont L. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol predisposes for the development of Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. PLOS ONE. (2014) 9:e108775. 10.1371/journal.pone.0108775 25268498 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

7.Eichner M Augustin C Fromm A Piontek A Walther W Bücker R. In colon epithelia, Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin causes focal leaks by targeting claudins which are apically accessible due to tight junction derangement. J Infect Dis. (2017) 217:147–57. 10.1093/infdis/jix485 28968861 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

8.Capaldo CT Nusrat A. Cytokine regulation of tight junctions. Biochimica et biophysica acta. (2009) 1788:864–71. 10.1016/j.bbamem.2008.08.027 18952050 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

9.Pasparakis M. IKK/NF-kappaB signaling in intestinal epithelial cells controls immune homeostasis in the gut. Mucosal Immunol. (2008) 1(Suppl.)1:S54–7. 10.1038/mi.2008.53 19079232 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

10.Kaetzel CS. The polymeric immunoglobulin receptor: bridging innate and adaptive immune responses at mucosal surfaces. Immunol Rev. (2005) 206:83–99. 10.1111/j.0105-2896.2005.00278.x 16048543 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

11.Becker S Oelschlaeger TA Wullaert A Pasparakis M Wehkamp J Stange EF. Bacteria regulate intestinal epithelial cell differentiation factors both in vitro and in vivo. PLOS ONE. (2013) 8:e55620. 10.1371/journal.pone.0055620 23418 447 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

12.Eckmann L Jung H Schuerer-Maly C Panja A Morzycka-Wroblewska E Kagnoff MF. Differential cytokine expression by human intestinal epithelial cell lines: regulated expression of interleukin-8. Gastroenterology. (1993) 105:1689–97. 10.1016/0016-5085(93)91064-O 8253345 [PubMed] [DOI]

13.Gewirtz AT Navas TA Lyons S Godowski PJ Madara JL. Cutting edge: bacterial flagellin activates basolaterally expressed TLR5 to induce epithelial proinflammatory gene expression. J Immunol. (2001) 167:1882–5. 10.4049/jimmunol.167.4.1882 11489966 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

14.Maresca M Yahi N Younès-Sakr L Boyron M Caporiccio B Fantini J. Both direct and indirect effects account for the pro-inflammatory activity of enteropathogenic mycotoxins on the human intestinal epithelium: stimulation of interleukin-8 secretion, potentiation of interleukin-1beta effect and increase in the transepithelial passage of commensal bacteria. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. (2008) 228:84–92. 10.1016/j.taap.2007.11.013 18308354 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

15.Ramos HC Rumbo M Sirard J-C. Bacterial flagellins: mediators of pathogenicity and host immune responses in mucosa. Trends Microbiol. (2004) 12:509–17. 10.1016/j.tim.2004.09.002 15488392 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

53 references, page 1 of 4
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