publication . Article . Other literature type . 2014

Malassezia yeasts: how many species infect humans and animals?

F. Javier Cabañes;
Open Access
  • Published: 27 Feb 2014 Journal: PLoS Pathogens, volume 10, page e1003892 (eissn: 1553-7374, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
  • Country: Spain
Abstract
Malassezia species are lipophilic yeasts that are members of the normal mycobiota of the skin and mucosal sites of a variety of homeothermic animals. They are also among the few basidiomycetous fungi, such as some Cryptococcus spp., Rhodotorula spp., and Trichosporon spp., that can produce disease in man and animals. However, in contrast with these other species, which are quite often involved in disseminated infections in immunosuppressed patients, Malassezia yeasts are associated mainly with certain skin diseases [1]. This special lipophilic group of yeasts is unique among the fungi. Phylogenetically, they form a well-defined cluster of skinliving yeasts, surr...
Subjects
free text keywords: Immunology, Genetics, Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Parasitology, Virology, Pearls, Mycology, Veterinary Science, Veterinary Diseases, Veterinary Mycology, Immunologic diseases. Allergy, RC581-607, Biology (General), QH301-705.5, Biology, Filobasidiales, biology.organism_classification, Pucciniomycotina, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon, Cryptococcus, Agaricomycotina, Malassezia, Sporidiobolales
Related Organizations
30 references, page 1 of 2

1 Sugita J, Boekhout T, Velegraki A, Guillot J, Hadina S, et al. (2010) Epidemiology of Malassezia-related skin diseases. In: Boekhout T, Guého E, Mayser P, Velegraki A, editors. Malassezia and the skin. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag. pp. 65–119.

2 Saunders CW, Scheynius A, Heitman J (2012) Malassezia fungi are specialized to live on skin and associated with dandruff, eczema, and other skin diseases. PLOS Pathog 8: e1002701 doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002701 22737067 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

3 Hibbett DS, Binder M, Bischoff JF, Blackwell M, Cannon PF, et al (2007) A higher level phylogenetic classification of the Fungi. Mycol Res 111: 509–547.17572334 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

4 CastelláG, Coutinho SD, Cabañes FJ (2013) Phylogenetic relationships of Malassezia species based on multilocus sequence analysis. Med Mycol. E-pub ahead of print doi:10.3109/13693786.2013.815372

5 Simmons RB, Guého E (1990) A new species of Malassezia . Mycol Res 94: 1146–1149. [OpenAIRE]

6 Guého E, Midgley G, Guillot J (1996) The genus Malassezia with description of four new species. Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 69: 337–355.8836432 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

7 Guillot J, Chermette R, Guého E (1994) Prévalence du genre Malassezia chez les mammifères. J Mycol Méd 4: 72–79.

8 Bond R, Howell SA, Haywood PJ, Lloyd DH (1997) Isolation of Malassezia sympodialis and Malassezia globosa from healthy pet cats. Vet Rec 141: 200–201.9292976 [PubMed]

9 Crespo MJ, Abarca ML, Cabañes FJ (1999) Isolation of Malassezia furfur from a cat. J Clin Microbiol 37: 1573–1574.10203525 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

10 Crespo MJ, Abarca ML, Cabañes FJ (2002) Occurrence of Malassezia spp. in horses and domestic ruminants. Mycoses 45: 333–337.12572724 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

11 Hirai A, Kano R, Makimura K, Duarte ER, Hamdan JS, et al (2004) Malassezia nana sp. nov., a novel lipid-dependent yeast species isolated from animals. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 54: 623–627.15023986 [PubMed]

12 Cabañes FJ, Theelen B, CastelláC, Boekhout T (2007) Two new lipid dependent Malassezia species from domestic animals. FEMS Yeast Res 7: 1064–1076.17367513 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

13 Crespo Erchiga V, Hay RJ (2010) Pityriasis versicolor and other Malasssezia skin diseases. In: Boekhout T, Guého E, Mayser P, Velegraki A, editors. Malassezia and the skin. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag. pp. 175–199.

14 Gaitanis G, Velegraki A, Mayser P, Bassukas ID (2013) Skin diseases associated with Malassezia yeasts: facts and controversies. Clin Dermatol 31: 455–463.23806162 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

15 Gaitanis G, Magiatis P, Hantschke M, Bassukas ID, Velegraki A (2012) The Malassezia genus in skin and systemic diseases. Clin Microbiol Rev 25: 106–141.22232373 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

30 references, page 1 of 2
Abstract
Malassezia species are lipophilic yeasts that are members of the normal mycobiota of the skin and mucosal sites of a variety of homeothermic animals. They are also among the few basidiomycetous fungi, such as some Cryptococcus spp., Rhodotorula spp., and Trichosporon spp., that can produce disease in man and animals. However, in contrast with these other species, which are quite often involved in disseminated infections in immunosuppressed patients, Malassezia yeasts are associated mainly with certain skin diseases [1]. This special lipophilic group of yeasts is unique among the fungi. Phylogenetically, they form a well-defined cluster of skinliving yeasts, surr...
Subjects
free text keywords: Immunology, Genetics, Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Parasitology, Virology, Pearls, Mycology, Veterinary Science, Veterinary Diseases, Veterinary Mycology, Immunologic diseases. Allergy, RC581-607, Biology (General), QH301-705.5, Biology, Filobasidiales, biology.organism_classification, Pucciniomycotina, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon, Cryptococcus, Agaricomycotina, Malassezia, Sporidiobolales
Related Organizations
30 references, page 1 of 2

1 Sugita J, Boekhout T, Velegraki A, Guillot J, Hadina S, et al. (2010) Epidemiology of Malassezia-related skin diseases. In: Boekhout T, Guého E, Mayser P, Velegraki A, editors. Malassezia and the skin. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag. pp. 65–119.

2 Saunders CW, Scheynius A, Heitman J (2012) Malassezia fungi are specialized to live on skin and associated with dandruff, eczema, and other skin diseases. PLOS Pathog 8: e1002701 doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002701 22737067 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

3 Hibbett DS, Binder M, Bischoff JF, Blackwell M, Cannon PF, et al (2007) A higher level phylogenetic classification of the Fungi. Mycol Res 111: 509–547.17572334 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

4 CastelláG, Coutinho SD, Cabañes FJ (2013) Phylogenetic relationships of Malassezia species based on multilocus sequence analysis. Med Mycol. E-pub ahead of print doi:10.3109/13693786.2013.815372

5 Simmons RB, Guého E (1990) A new species of Malassezia . Mycol Res 94: 1146–1149. [OpenAIRE]

6 Guého E, Midgley G, Guillot J (1996) The genus Malassezia with description of four new species. Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 69: 337–355.8836432 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

7 Guillot J, Chermette R, Guého E (1994) Prévalence du genre Malassezia chez les mammifères. J Mycol Méd 4: 72–79.

8 Bond R, Howell SA, Haywood PJ, Lloyd DH (1997) Isolation of Malassezia sympodialis and Malassezia globosa from healthy pet cats. Vet Rec 141: 200–201.9292976 [PubMed]

9 Crespo MJ, Abarca ML, Cabañes FJ (1999) Isolation of Malassezia furfur from a cat. J Clin Microbiol 37: 1573–1574.10203525 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

10 Crespo MJ, Abarca ML, Cabañes FJ (2002) Occurrence of Malassezia spp. in horses and domestic ruminants. Mycoses 45: 333–337.12572724 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

11 Hirai A, Kano R, Makimura K, Duarte ER, Hamdan JS, et al (2004) Malassezia nana sp. nov., a novel lipid-dependent yeast species isolated from animals. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 54: 623–627.15023986 [PubMed]

12 Cabañes FJ, Theelen B, CastelláC, Boekhout T (2007) Two new lipid dependent Malassezia species from domestic animals. FEMS Yeast Res 7: 1064–1076.17367513 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

13 Crespo Erchiga V, Hay RJ (2010) Pityriasis versicolor and other Malasssezia skin diseases. In: Boekhout T, Guého E, Mayser P, Velegraki A, editors. Malassezia and the skin. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag. pp. 175–199.

14 Gaitanis G, Velegraki A, Mayser P, Bassukas ID (2013) Skin diseases associated with Malassezia yeasts: facts and controversies. Clin Dermatol 31: 455–463.23806162 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

15 Gaitanis G, Magiatis P, Hantschke M, Bassukas ID, Velegraki A (2012) The Malassezia genus in skin and systemic diseases. Clin Microbiol Rev 25: 106–141.22232373 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

30 references, page 1 of 2
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