publication . Other literature type . Article . 2018

Bacteria colonising Penstemon digitalis show volatile and tissue-specific responses to a natural concentration range of the floral volatile linalool

Robert R. Junker; Amy L. Parachnowitsch; Douglas G. Scofield; Rosalie C. F. Burdon;
Open Access
  • Published: 01 Mar 2018
  • Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
Abstract
Bacteria on floral tissue can have negative effects by consuming resources and affecting nectar quality, which subsequently could reduce pollinator visitation and plant fitness. Plants however can employ chemical defences to reduce bacteria density. In North American, bee-pollinated Penstemon digitalis, the nectar volatile S-(+)-linalool can influence plant fitness, and terpenes such as linalool are known for their antimicrobial properties suggesting that it may also play a role in plant–microbe interactions. Therefore, we hypothesized linalool could affect bacterial growth on P. digitalis plants/flowers. Because P. digitalis emits linalool from nectar and necta...
Subjects
Medical Subject Headings: food and beveragesfungi
free text keywords: Biochemistry, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics, Original Article, Anti-microbial, Plant defence, Scented nectar, Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), Botany, Phyllosphere, Linalool, chemistry.chemical_compound, chemistry, Bacteria, biology.organism_classification, biology, Petal, Penstemon digitalis, Pollinator, Nectar, Terpene
Related Organizations
66 references, page 1 of 5

Aleklett, K, Hart, M, Shade, A. The microbial ecology of flowers: an emerging frontier in phyllosphere research. Botany. 2014; 92: 253-266 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Álvarez-Pérez, S, Herrera, CM, Vega, C. Zooming-in on floral nectar: a first exploration of nectar-associated bacteria in wild plant communities. FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2012; 80: 591-602 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Álvarez-Pérez, S, Lievens, B, Jacquemyn, H, Herrera, CM. Acinetobacter nectaris sp. nov. and Acinetobacter boissieri sp. nov., isolated from floral nectar of wild Mediterranean insect-pollinated plants. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2013; 63: 1532-1539 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Bartlewicz, J, Lievens, B, Honnay, O, Jacquemyn, H. Microbial diversity in the floral nectar of Linaria vulgaris along an urbanization gradient. BMC Ecol. 2016 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

Benson, DA, Cavanaugh, M, Clark, K. GenBank. Nucleic Acids Res. 2013; 41: D36-D42 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Brady, CL, Venter, SN, Cleenwerck, I. Pantoea vagans sp. nov., Pantoea eucalypti sp. nov., Pantoea deleyi sp. nov. and Pantoea anthophila sp. nov. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2009; 59: 2339-2345 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Bulgarelli, D, Schlaeppi, K, Spaepen, S. Structure and functions of the bacterial microbiota of plants. Annu Rev Plant Biol. 2013; 64: 807-838 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Burdon, RCF, Raguso, RA, Kessler, A, Parachnowitsch, AL. Spatiotemporal floral scent variation of Penstemon digitalis. J Chem Ecol. 2015; 41: 641-650 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Canto, A, Herrera, CM. Micro-organisms behind the pollination scenes: microbial imprint on floral nectar sugar variation in a tropical plant community. Ann Bot. 2012; 110: 1173-1183 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Coutinho, TA, Venter, SN. Pantoea ananatis: an unconventional plant pathogen. Mol Plant Pathol. 2009; 10: 325-335 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Del Giudice, L, Massardo, DR, Pontieri, P. The microbial community of Vetiver root and its involvement into essential oil biogenesis: Vetiver root bacteria and essential oil biogenesis. Environ Microbiol. 2008; 10: 2824-2841 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Dorman, HJD, Deans, SG. Antimicrobial agents from plants: antibacterial activity of plant volatile oils. J Appl Microbiol. 2000; 88: 308-316 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Dudareva, N, Klempien, A, Muhlemann, JK, Kaplan, I. Biosynthesis, function and metabolic engineering of plant volatile organic compounds. New Phytol. 2013; 198: 16-32 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Effmert, U, Kalderás, J, Warnke, R, Piechulla, B. Volatile mediated interactions between bacteria and fungi in the soil. J Chem Ecol. 2012; 38: 665-703 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Feistner, G, Korth, H, Ko, H. Ferrorosamine A from Erwinia rhapontici. Curr Microbiol. 1983; 8: 239-243 [DOI]

66 references, page 1 of 5
Abstract
Bacteria on floral tissue can have negative effects by consuming resources and affecting nectar quality, which subsequently could reduce pollinator visitation and plant fitness. Plants however can employ chemical defences to reduce bacteria density. In North American, bee-pollinated Penstemon digitalis, the nectar volatile S-(+)-linalool can influence plant fitness, and terpenes such as linalool are known for their antimicrobial properties suggesting that it may also play a role in plant–microbe interactions. Therefore, we hypothesized linalool could affect bacterial growth on P. digitalis plants/flowers. Because P. digitalis emits linalool from nectar and necta...
Subjects
Medical Subject Headings: food and beveragesfungi
free text keywords: Biochemistry, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics, Original Article, Anti-microbial, Plant defence, Scented nectar, Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), Botany, Phyllosphere, Linalool, chemistry.chemical_compound, chemistry, Bacteria, biology.organism_classification, biology, Petal, Penstemon digitalis, Pollinator, Nectar, Terpene
Related Organizations
66 references, page 1 of 5

Aleklett, K, Hart, M, Shade, A. The microbial ecology of flowers: an emerging frontier in phyllosphere research. Botany. 2014; 92: 253-266 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Álvarez-Pérez, S, Herrera, CM, Vega, C. Zooming-in on floral nectar: a first exploration of nectar-associated bacteria in wild plant communities. FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2012; 80: 591-602 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Álvarez-Pérez, S, Lievens, B, Jacquemyn, H, Herrera, CM. Acinetobacter nectaris sp. nov. and Acinetobacter boissieri sp. nov., isolated from floral nectar of wild Mediterranean insect-pollinated plants. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2013; 63: 1532-1539 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Bartlewicz, J, Lievens, B, Honnay, O, Jacquemyn, H. Microbial diversity in the floral nectar of Linaria vulgaris along an urbanization gradient. BMC Ecol. 2016 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

Benson, DA, Cavanaugh, M, Clark, K. GenBank. Nucleic Acids Res. 2013; 41: D36-D42 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Brady, CL, Venter, SN, Cleenwerck, I. Pantoea vagans sp. nov., Pantoea eucalypti sp. nov., Pantoea deleyi sp. nov. and Pantoea anthophila sp. nov. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2009; 59: 2339-2345 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Bulgarelli, D, Schlaeppi, K, Spaepen, S. Structure and functions of the bacterial microbiota of plants. Annu Rev Plant Biol. 2013; 64: 807-838 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Burdon, RCF, Raguso, RA, Kessler, A, Parachnowitsch, AL. Spatiotemporal floral scent variation of Penstemon digitalis. J Chem Ecol. 2015; 41: 641-650 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Canto, A, Herrera, CM. Micro-organisms behind the pollination scenes: microbial imprint on floral nectar sugar variation in a tropical plant community. Ann Bot. 2012; 110: 1173-1183 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Coutinho, TA, Venter, SN. Pantoea ananatis: an unconventional plant pathogen. Mol Plant Pathol. 2009; 10: 325-335 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Del Giudice, L, Massardo, DR, Pontieri, P. The microbial community of Vetiver root and its involvement into essential oil biogenesis: Vetiver root bacteria and essential oil biogenesis. Environ Microbiol. 2008; 10: 2824-2841 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Dorman, HJD, Deans, SG. Antimicrobial agents from plants: antibacterial activity of plant volatile oils. J Appl Microbiol. 2000; 88: 308-316 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Dudareva, N, Klempien, A, Muhlemann, JK, Kaplan, I. Biosynthesis, function and metabolic engineering of plant volatile organic compounds. New Phytol. 2013; 198: 16-32 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Effmert, U, Kalderás, J, Warnke, R, Piechulla, B. Volatile mediated interactions between bacteria and fungi in the soil. J Chem Ecol. 2012; 38: 665-703 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Feistner, G, Korth, H, Ko, H. Ferrorosamine A from Erwinia rhapontici. Curr Microbiol. 1983; 8: 239-243 [DOI]

66 references, page 1 of 5
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