publication . Other literature type . Article . 2005

Attraction to Motion

Fabio Marconato; Giorgio Vallortigara; Lucia Regolin;
Open Access
  • Published: 07 Jun 2005
  • Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Abstract
When only a small number of points of light attached to the torso and limbs of a moving organism are visible, the animation correctly conveys the animal's activity. Here we report that newly hatched chicks, reared and hatched in darkness, at their first exposure to point-light animation sequences, exhibit a spontaneous preference to approach biological motion patterns. Intriguingly, this predisposition is not specific for the motion of a hen, but extends to the pattern of motion of other vertebrates, even to that of a potential predator such as a cat. The predisposition seems to reflect the existence of a mechanism in the brain aimed at orienting the young anima...
Persistent Identifiers
Subjects
free text keywords: General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology, General Immunology and Microbiology, General Neuroscience, General Agricultural and Biological Sciences, Research Article, Animal Behavior, Psychology, Chicken, Torso, medicine.anatomical_structure, medicine, Motion perception, Darkness, Video recording, Imprinting (psychology), Vertebrate Animals, Biological motion, Neuroscience, Animation, Biology, lcsh:Biology (General), lcsh:QH301-705.5
Related Organizations
35 references, page 1 of 3

Bateson, PPG, Heyes, C, Huber, L. What must be known in order to understand imprinting?. The evolution of cognition. 2000: 85-102

Horn, G. Pathways of the past: The imprint of memory. Nat Neurosci. 2004; 5: 108-120

Morton, J, Johnson, MH. CONSPEC and CONLERN: A two process theory of infant face recognition. Psychol Rev. 1991; 98: 164-181 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

Bolhuis, JJ. Mechanisms of avian imprinting: A review. Biol Rev. 1991; 66: 303-345 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

Johansson, G. Visual perception of biological motion and a model for its analysis. Percept Psychophys. 1973; 14: 201-211

Arterberry, ME, Bornstein, MH. Infant perceptual and conceptual categorization: The role of static and dynamic stimulus attributes. Cognition. 2002; 86: 1-24 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

Bertenthal, BI, Proffitt, D, Kramer, S. Perception of biomechanical motion by infants: Implementation of various processing constraints. J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 1987; 4: 577-585

Bertenthal, BI, Proffitt, DR, Spetner, NB, Thomas, MA. The development of infant sensitivity to biomechanical motions. Child Dev. 1985; 56: 531-543 [PubMed]

Frith, U, Frith, CD. Development and neurophysiology of mentalizing. Phil Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2003; 358: 459-473 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

Schmuckler, MA, Fairhall, JL. Visual proprioceptive intermodal perception using point light displays. Child Dev. 2001; 72: 949-962 [PubMed]

Pavlova, M, Krageloh-Mann, I, Sokolov, A, Birbaumer, M. Recognition of point-light biological motion displays by young children. Perception. 2001; 30: 925-933 [PubMed]

Grossman, E, Donnelly, M, Price, R, Pickens, V, Morgan, V. Brain areas involved in perception of biological motion. J Cogn Neurosci. 2000; 12: 711-720 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

Oram, MW, Perrett, DI. Responses of anterior superior temporal polysensory (STPa) neurons to “biological motion” stimuli. J Cogn Neurosci. 1994; 6: 99-116 [PubMed]

Vaina, L, Solomon, J, Choudhury, S, Sinha, P, Belliveau, JW. Functional neuroanatomy of biological motion perception in humans. Proc Nat Acad Sci U S A. 2001; 98: 11656-11661

Blake, R. Cats perceive biological motion. Psychol Sci. 1993; 4: 54-57

35 references, page 1 of 3
Abstract
When only a small number of points of light attached to the torso and limbs of a moving organism are visible, the animation correctly conveys the animal's activity. Here we report that newly hatched chicks, reared and hatched in darkness, at their first exposure to point-light animation sequences, exhibit a spontaneous preference to approach biological motion patterns. Intriguingly, this predisposition is not specific for the motion of a hen, but extends to the pattern of motion of other vertebrates, even to that of a potential predator such as a cat. The predisposition seems to reflect the existence of a mechanism in the brain aimed at orienting the young anima...
Persistent Identifiers
Subjects
free text keywords: General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology, General Immunology and Microbiology, General Neuroscience, General Agricultural and Biological Sciences, Research Article, Animal Behavior, Psychology, Chicken, Torso, medicine.anatomical_structure, medicine, Motion perception, Darkness, Video recording, Imprinting (psychology), Vertebrate Animals, Biological motion, Neuroscience, Animation, Biology, lcsh:Biology (General), lcsh:QH301-705.5
Related Organizations
35 references, page 1 of 3

Bateson, PPG, Heyes, C, Huber, L. What must be known in order to understand imprinting?. The evolution of cognition. 2000: 85-102

Horn, G. Pathways of the past: The imprint of memory. Nat Neurosci. 2004; 5: 108-120

Morton, J, Johnson, MH. CONSPEC and CONLERN: A two process theory of infant face recognition. Psychol Rev. 1991; 98: 164-181 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

Bolhuis, JJ. Mechanisms of avian imprinting: A review. Biol Rev. 1991; 66: 303-345 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

Johansson, G. Visual perception of biological motion and a model for its analysis. Percept Psychophys. 1973; 14: 201-211

Arterberry, ME, Bornstein, MH. Infant perceptual and conceptual categorization: The role of static and dynamic stimulus attributes. Cognition. 2002; 86: 1-24 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

Bertenthal, BI, Proffitt, D, Kramer, S. Perception of biomechanical motion by infants: Implementation of various processing constraints. J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 1987; 4: 577-585

Bertenthal, BI, Proffitt, DR, Spetner, NB, Thomas, MA. The development of infant sensitivity to biomechanical motions. Child Dev. 1985; 56: 531-543 [PubMed]

Frith, U, Frith, CD. Development and neurophysiology of mentalizing. Phil Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2003; 358: 459-473 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

Schmuckler, MA, Fairhall, JL. Visual proprioceptive intermodal perception using point light displays. Child Dev. 2001; 72: 949-962 [PubMed]

Pavlova, M, Krageloh-Mann, I, Sokolov, A, Birbaumer, M. Recognition of point-light biological motion displays by young children. Perception. 2001; 30: 925-933 [PubMed]

Grossman, E, Donnelly, M, Price, R, Pickens, V, Morgan, V. Brain areas involved in perception of biological motion. J Cogn Neurosci. 2000; 12: 711-720 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

Oram, MW, Perrett, DI. Responses of anterior superior temporal polysensory (STPa) neurons to “biological motion” stimuli. J Cogn Neurosci. 1994; 6: 99-116 [PubMed]

Vaina, L, Solomon, J, Choudhury, S, Sinha, P, Belliveau, JW. Functional neuroanatomy of biological motion perception in humans. Proc Nat Acad Sci U S A. 2001; 98: 11656-11661

Blake, R. Cats perceive biological motion. Psychol Sci. 1993; 4: 54-57

35 references, page 1 of 3
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