publication . Article . 2019

The Impact of Digital Research: Thinking about the MARK16 Project

Claire Clivaz;
Open Access English
  • Published: 01 Mar 2019
  • Publisher: HAL CCSD
  • Country: France
Abstract
International audience; This article presents the challenges of developing Humanities research in a digital environment in relation to a New Testament test-case: the MARK16 project. The first section argues that virtual research environments (VREs) have become an excellent milieu in which to develop a digitized research project based on collaborative work. The second section presents an overview of VREs and digital projects on the New Testament. The third section demonstrates the ways in which the MARK16 project participates in the development of VREs and fosters new modes of engaging material in digitized NT research. Preamble The research question of this paper is simultaneously simple and boundless: does it matter if we practice Humanities research in a digital culture rather than in traditional print cultures? And what does the answer to this question mean for New Testament research in particular? Such abyssal questions are fundamental and should at least be considered when a scholar is planning a research project in biblical studies, theology, or religious studies. Indeed, the number of digital research projects are increasing at the international, European, and national levels.1 Such questions closely accompanied the preparatory phase of the SNSF PRIMA grant MARK16, a five-year project supported by the Swiss National Foundation.2 These interrogations are deeply embedded within the opening phase of the project and will remain so throughout, as MARK16 aims to build a new Digital Humanities research model. This will be based on a test case that is well known in New Testament textual criticism (NTTC): the ending of the Gospel according to Mark. Consequently, this article explores the epistemological digital turn in the Humanities and relates it to the MARK16 project, hoping to inspire further research and engagement in NTTC and New Testament studies. The first section outlines some challenges for digital research, pointing to the fact that virtual research environments (VREs) seem to be the main emergent digital milieu in which this work occurs. The second section presents an overview of VREs in New Testament and Early Christian research, and the third discusses the challenges presented by MARK16 in building a new Humanities research model around a NTTC test case.
Persistent Identifiers
Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) [Beta]
Subjects
free text keywords: Digital Humanities, New Testament, Humanities, Gospel of Mark, VRE, digital culture, research, history, DARIAH, digital practices, [SHS]Humanities and Social Sciences, [SHS.RELIG]Humanities and Social Sciences/Religions, Digital Humanities, New Testament, Humanities, Gospel of Mark, VRE, digital culture, research, history, DARIAH, digital practices, Religion (General), BL1-50, Religious studies, Sociology, Section (archaeology), Engineering ethics, Research question, Digital humanities, Early Christianity, Biblical studies, Gospel, media_common.quotation_subject, media_common, New Testament, Textual criticism
Related Organizations
Communities
Other Communities
  • Social Science and Humanities
41 references, page 1 of 3

Bellamy, Craig. “The Sound of Many Hands Clapping: Teaching the Digital Humanities through Virtual Research Environment (VREs)”. Digital Humanities Quarterly 6/2 (2012), § 1-17. http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/ vol/6/2/000119/000119.html.

Black, Dan A. (ed.). Perspectives on the Ending of Mark. 4 Views. Nashville: Broadman & Holman, 2008.

Busa, Roberto. “Foreword: Perspectives on the Digital Humanities.” In A Companion to Digital Humanities, edited by Susan Schreibman, Ray Siemens, John Unsworth. Edinburgh: Blackwell, 2004, http://www.digitalhumanities.org/companion/.

Bush, Vannevar. “As we May Think.” The Atlantic Magazine. (9 July 1945), http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/ print/1945/07/as-we-may- think/303881/.

Candela, Leonardo, Castelli, Donatella, Pagano, Pasquale. “Virtual Research Environments: An Overview and a Research Agenda.” Data Science Journal 12 (2013), 75-81. DOI: 10.2481/dsj.GRDI-013.

Carusi, Annamaria, and Reimer, Torsten. “Virtual Research Environment Collaborative Landscape Study. A JISC funded project.” London: JISC, 2010, 1-106. http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/publications/vrelandscapereport.pdf.

Chatzidialou, Nephelie, and Dallas, Costis. DARIAH-EU Scholarly Practices Survey. European survey on scholarly practices and digital needs in the arts and humanities. Athens: IMIS-Athena Research Center, 2016, https://zenodo.org/ record/260101. German translation by Beat Immenhauser: https://zenodo.org/record/260250; French translation by Claire Clivaz: https://zenodo.org/record/254112.

Clivaz, Claire. “'Incroyants de joie' (Lc 24, 41). Point de vue, Histoire et Poétique.” In Regards croisés sur la Bible. Etudes sur le point de vue. Actes du IIIe colloque international du Réseau de recherche en narrativité biblique. Paris 8-10 juin 2006 (Lectio Divina), edited by RRENAB. Paris: Cerf, 2007, 183-195.

Clivaz, Claire. “The New Testament at the Time of the Egyptian Papyri. Reflections Based on P12, P75 and P126 (P. Amh. 3b, P. Bod. XIV-XV and PSI 1497).” In Reading New Testament Papyri in Context - Lire les papyrus du Nouveau Testament dans leur contexte (BETL 242), edited by Claire Clivaz and Jean Zumstein, with Jenny Read-Heimerdinger and Julie Paik. Leuven: Peeters, 2011, 15-55.

Clivaz, Claire. “What is the Current State of Play on Jesus' Laughter ? Reading the Gospel of Judas in the midst of Scholarly Excitement.” In Judasevangelium und Codex Tchacos. Studien zur religionsgeschichtlichen Verortung einer gnostischen Schriftensammlung (WUNT I 297), edited by Edgar E. Popkes and Gregory Wurst. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2012, 213-242.

Clivaz, Claire, Simon Mimouni, and Pouderon, Bernard, eds. Les judaïsmes dans tous leurs états aux Ier-IIIe siècles (Les Judéens des synagogues, les chrétiens et les rabbins). Actes du colloque de Lausanne 12-14 décembre 2012 (JAOC 5). Turnhout: Brepols, 2015.

Clivaz, Claire, Cécile Pache, Marion Rivoal, and Sankar, Martial. “Multimodal Literacies and Academic Publishing: the eTalks”. ISU 35 (2015/4), 251-258, http://content.iospress.com/articles/information-services-and-use/isu781.

Clivaz, Claire. Ecritures digitales. Digital Writing, digital Scriptures (DBS 4). Leiden: Brill, forthcoming.

Elliott, J. Keith. “The Last Twelve Verses of Mark: Original or Not?” In Perspectives on the Ending of Mark, 4 Views, edited by Dan A. Black, 80-102. Nashville: Broadman & Holman, 2008.

Epp, Eldon J. “It's All about Variants: A Variant-Conscious Approach to New Testament Textual Criticism.” HTR 100 (2007), 275-308.

41 references, page 1 of 3
5 research outcomes, page 1 of 1
Abstract
International audience; This article presents the challenges of developing Humanities research in a digital environment in relation to a New Testament test-case: the MARK16 project. The first section argues that virtual research environments (VREs) have become an excellent milieu in which to develop a digitized research project based on collaborative work. The second section presents an overview of VREs and digital projects on the New Testament. The third section demonstrates the ways in which the MARK16 project participates in the development of VREs and fosters new modes of engaging material in digitized NT research. Preamble The research question of this paper is simultaneously simple and boundless: does it matter if we practice Humanities research in a digital culture rather than in traditional print cultures? And what does the answer to this question mean for New Testament research in particular? Such abyssal questions are fundamental and should at least be considered when a scholar is planning a research project in biblical studies, theology, or religious studies. Indeed, the number of digital research projects are increasing at the international, European, and national levels.1 Such questions closely accompanied the preparatory phase of the SNSF PRIMA grant MARK16, a five-year project supported by the Swiss National Foundation.2 These interrogations are deeply embedded within the opening phase of the project and will remain so throughout, as MARK16 aims to build a new Digital Humanities research model. This will be based on a test case that is well known in New Testament textual criticism (NTTC): the ending of the Gospel according to Mark. Consequently, this article explores the epistemological digital turn in the Humanities and relates it to the MARK16 project, hoping to inspire further research and engagement in NTTC and New Testament studies. The first section outlines some challenges for digital research, pointing to the fact that virtual research environments (VREs) seem to be the main emergent digital milieu in which this work occurs. The second section presents an overview of VREs in New Testament and Early Christian research, and the third discusses the challenges presented by MARK16 in building a new Humanities research model around a NTTC test case.
Persistent Identifiers
Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) [Beta]
Subjects
free text keywords: Digital Humanities, New Testament, Humanities, Gospel of Mark, VRE, digital culture, research, history, DARIAH, digital practices, [SHS]Humanities and Social Sciences, [SHS.RELIG]Humanities and Social Sciences/Religions, Digital Humanities, New Testament, Humanities, Gospel of Mark, VRE, digital culture, research, history, DARIAH, digital practices, Religion (General), BL1-50, Religious studies, Sociology, Section (archaeology), Engineering ethics, Research question, Digital humanities, Early Christianity, Biblical studies, Gospel, media_common.quotation_subject, media_common, New Testament, Textual criticism
Related Organizations
Communities
Other Communities
  • Social Science and Humanities
41 references, page 1 of 3

Bellamy, Craig. “The Sound of Many Hands Clapping: Teaching the Digital Humanities through Virtual Research Environment (VREs)”. Digital Humanities Quarterly 6/2 (2012), § 1-17. http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/ vol/6/2/000119/000119.html.

Black, Dan A. (ed.). Perspectives on the Ending of Mark. 4 Views. Nashville: Broadman & Holman, 2008.

Busa, Roberto. “Foreword: Perspectives on the Digital Humanities.” In A Companion to Digital Humanities, edited by Susan Schreibman, Ray Siemens, John Unsworth. Edinburgh: Blackwell, 2004, http://www.digitalhumanities.org/companion/.

Bush, Vannevar. “As we May Think.” The Atlantic Magazine. (9 July 1945), http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/ print/1945/07/as-we-may- think/303881/.

Candela, Leonardo, Castelli, Donatella, Pagano, Pasquale. “Virtual Research Environments: An Overview and a Research Agenda.” Data Science Journal 12 (2013), 75-81. DOI: 10.2481/dsj.GRDI-013.

Carusi, Annamaria, and Reimer, Torsten. “Virtual Research Environment Collaborative Landscape Study. A JISC funded project.” London: JISC, 2010, 1-106. http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/publications/vrelandscapereport.pdf.

Chatzidialou, Nephelie, and Dallas, Costis. DARIAH-EU Scholarly Practices Survey. European survey on scholarly practices and digital needs in the arts and humanities. Athens: IMIS-Athena Research Center, 2016, https://zenodo.org/ record/260101. German translation by Beat Immenhauser: https://zenodo.org/record/260250; French translation by Claire Clivaz: https://zenodo.org/record/254112.

Clivaz, Claire. “'Incroyants de joie' (Lc 24, 41). Point de vue, Histoire et Poétique.” In Regards croisés sur la Bible. Etudes sur le point de vue. Actes du IIIe colloque international du Réseau de recherche en narrativité biblique. Paris 8-10 juin 2006 (Lectio Divina), edited by RRENAB. Paris: Cerf, 2007, 183-195.

Clivaz, Claire. “The New Testament at the Time of the Egyptian Papyri. Reflections Based on P12, P75 and P126 (P. Amh. 3b, P. Bod. XIV-XV and PSI 1497).” In Reading New Testament Papyri in Context - Lire les papyrus du Nouveau Testament dans leur contexte (BETL 242), edited by Claire Clivaz and Jean Zumstein, with Jenny Read-Heimerdinger and Julie Paik. Leuven: Peeters, 2011, 15-55.

Clivaz, Claire. “What is the Current State of Play on Jesus' Laughter ? Reading the Gospel of Judas in the midst of Scholarly Excitement.” In Judasevangelium und Codex Tchacos. Studien zur religionsgeschichtlichen Verortung einer gnostischen Schriftensammlung (WUNT I 297), edited by Edgar E. Popkes and Gregory Wurst. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2012, 213-242.

Clivaz, Claire, Simon Mimouni, and Pouderon, Bernard, eds. Les judaïsmes dans tous leurs états aux Ier-IIIe siècles (Les Judéens des synagogues, les chrétiens et les rabbins). Actes du colloque de Lausanne 12-14 décembre 2012 (JAOC 5). Turnhout: Brepols, 2015.

Clivaz, Claire, Cécile Pache, Marion Rivoal, and Sankar, Martial. “Multimodal Literacies and Academic Publishing: the eTalks”. ISU 35 (2015/4), 251-258, http://content.iospress.com/articles/information-services-and-use/isu781.

Clivaz, Claire. Ecritures digitales. Digital Writing, digital Scriptures (DBS 4). Leiden: Brill, forthcoming.

Elliott, J. Keith. “The Last Twelve Verses of Mark: Original or Not?” In Perspectives on the Ending of Mark, 4 Views, edited by Dan A. Black, 80-102. Nashville: Broadman & Holman, 2008.

Epp, Eldon J. “It's All about Variants: A Variant-Conscious Approach to New Testament Textual Criticism.” HTR 100 (2007), 275-308.

41 references, page 1 of 3
5 research outcomes, page 1 of 1
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