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Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2014

Policing Engagement via Social Media

Miriam Fernandez; A. Elizabeth Cano; Harith Alani;
Open Access
English
Published: 10 Nov 2014
Publisher: Springer International Publishing
Abstract

Social Media is commonly used by policing organisations to spread the word on crime, weather, missing person, etc. In this work we aim to understand what attracts citizens to engage with social media policing content. To study these engagement dynamics we propose a combination of machine learning and semantic analysis techniques. Our initial research, performed over 3,200 posts from @dorsetpolice Twitter account, shows that writing longer posts, with positive sentiment, and sending them out before 4pm, was found to increase the probability of attracting attention. Additionally, posts about weather, roads and infrastructures, mentioning places, are also more likely to \ud attract attention.

Subjects by Vocabulary

Microsoft Academic Graph classification: Semantic Web World Wide Web Work (electrical) Public relations business.industry business Social media Social web Sociology Missing person Semantic analysis (knowledge representation) Dynamics (music)

12 references, page 1 of 2

1. Rowe, Matthew; Angeletou, Sofia and Alani, Harith (2011). Anticipating discussion activity on community forums. In: Third IEEE International Conference on Social Computing (SocialCom2011), 9-11 October 2011, Boston, MA, USA, pp. 315-322.

2. Crump, Jeremy. "What are the police doing on Twitter? Social media, the police and the public." Policy & Internet 3.4 (2011): 1-27

3. Denef, Sebastian, Petra S. Bayerl, and Nico A. Kaptein. "Social media and the police: tweeting practices of british police forces during the August 2011 riots." Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM, 2013. [OpenAIRE]

4. UK Police Twitter Accounts: https://twitter.com/nickkeane/lists/uk-police-force-twitters

5. NPIA. 2010. Engage: Digital and Social Media for the Police Service. London: National Policing Improvement Agency

6. Earl, Jennifer, et al. "This protest will be tweeted: Twitter and protest policing during the Pittsburgh G20." Information, Communication & Society 16.4 (2013): 459-478.

7. Bayerk P.S. et al. Who wants police in social media. 2014. In proceedings of the European Conference of Social Media, Brighton, UK.

8. Meeyoung Cha, Hamed Haddadi, Fabr ́ıcio Benevenuto, and Krishna P. Gummadi. Measuring user influence in twitter: The million follower fallacy. In Proc. 4th Int. AAAI Conf. on Weblogs and Social Media (ICWSM), Washington, DC, 2010.

9. Vicen ̧c Gomez, Andreas Kaltenbrunner, and Vicente Lo ́pez. Statistical analysis of the social network and discussion threads in slashdot. In WWW '08: Proceeding of the 17th international conference on World Wide Web, pages 645-654, New York, NY, USA, 2008. ACM.

10. Nasir Naveed, Thomas Gottron, Jerome Kunegis, and Arifah Che Alhadi. Bad news travel fast: A content-based analysis of interestingness on twitter. In Proc. 3rd Int. Conf. on Web Science, 2011, Bon, Germany, 2011.

Funded by
EC| TRIVALENT
Project
TRIVALENT
Terrorism pReventIon Via rAdicaLisation countEr-NarraTive
  • Funder: European Commission (EC)
  • Project Code: 740934
  • Funding stream: H2020 | RIA
Validated by funder
,
EC| TRIVALENT
Project
TRIVALENT
Terrorism pReventIon Via rAdicaLisation countEr-NarraTive
  • Funder: European Commission (EC)
  • Project Code: 740934
  • Funding stream: H2020 | RIA
Validated by funder
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Part of book or chapter of book . Conference object . 2014
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