publication . Preprint . 2014

Population Dynamics of Wolves and Coyotes at Yellowstone National Park: Modeling Interference Competition with an Infectious Disease

Blanco, Krystal; Barley, Kamal; Mubayi, Anuj;
Open Access English
  • Published: 25 Jul 2014
Abstract
Gray wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park (YNP) in 1995. The population initially flourished, but since 2003 the population has experience significant reductions due to factors that may include disease-induced mortality, illegal hunting, park control pro- grams, vehicle induced deaths and intra-species aggression. Despite facing similar conditions, and interference competition with the wolves, the coyote population at YNP has persisted. In this paper we introduce an epidemiological framework that incorporates natural, human-caused and disease-induced mortality as well as interference competition between two species of predators. The outcomes gen...
Subjects
free text keywords: Quantitative Biology - Populations and Evolution
Related Organizations
Funded by
NSF| REU Site: The Mathematical and Theoretical Biology Institute
Project
  • Funder: National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • Project Code: 1263374
  • Funding stream: Directorate for Mathematical & Physical Sciences | Division of Mathematical Sciences
Download from
22 references, page 1 of 2

[1] Emily S Almberg, Paul C Cross, Andrew P Dobson, Douglas W Smith, and Peter J Hudson. Parasite invasion following host reintroduction: a case study of yellowstone's wolves. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 367(1604):2840{2851, 2012.

[2] Emily S Almberg, Paul C Cross, and Douglas W Smith. Persistence of canine distemper virus in the greater yellowstone ecosystem's carnivore community. Ecological Applications, 20(7):2058{2074, 2010.

[3] Emily S Almberg, L David Mech, Douglas W Smith, Jennifer W Sheldon, and Robert L Crabtree. A serological survey of infectious disease in yellowstone national park's canid community. PLoS One, 4(9):e7042, 2009.

[4] LG Arlian, DL Vyszenski-Moher, and MJ Pole. Survival of adults and developmental stages of sarcoptes scabiei var. canis when o the host. Experimental & applied acarology, 6(3):181{187, 1989.

[5] Kim Murray Berger and Eric M Gese. Does interference competition with wolves limit the distribution and abundance of coyotes? Journal of Animal Ecology, 76(6):1075{1085, 2007.

[6] VA Bokil and CA Manore. Coexistence of competing species with a directly transmitted pathogen. 2010.

[7] Odo Diekmann, JAP Heesterbeek, and Johan AJ Metz. On the de nition and the computation of the basic reproduction ratio r 0 in models for infectious diseases in heterogeneous populations. Journal of Mathematical Biology, 28(4):365{382, 1990.

[8] Daniel Fortin, Hawthorne L Beyer, Mark S Boyce, Douglas W Smith, Thierry Duchesne, and Julie S Mao. Wolves in uence elk movements: behavior shapes a trophic cascade in yellowstone national park. Ecology, 86(5):1320{1330, 2005.

[9] Steven H Fritts, Edward E Bangs, Joseph A Fontaine, Mark R Johnson, Michael K Phillips, Edward D Koch, and John R Gunson. Planning and implementing a reintroduction of wolves to yellowstone national park and central idaho. Restoration Ecology, 5(1):7{27, 1997.

[10] Litao Han and Andrea Pugliese. Epidemics in two competing species. Nonlinear Analysis: Real World Applications, 10(2):723{744, 2009.

[11] Matt W Hayward and Michael Somers. Reintroduction of top-order predators. Number 5. John Wiley & Sons, 2009.

[12] Michael D Jimenez, Edward E Bangs, Carolyn Sime, and Valpa J Asher. Sarcoptic mange found in wolves in the rocky mountains in western united states. Journal of wildlife diseases, 46(4):1120{1125, 2010.

[13] JA Merkle, Daniel R Stahler, and Douglas W Smith. Interference competition between gray wolves and coyotes in yellowstone national park. Canadian Journal of Zoology, 87(1):56{63, 2009.

[15] Danny B Pence and Lamar A Windberg. Impact of a sarcoptic mange epizootic on a coyote population. The Journal of Wildlife Management, pages 624{633, 1994.

[16] DB Pence and E Ueckermann. Sarcoptic manage in wildlife. Revue scienti que et technique (International O ce of Epizootics), 21(2):385{398, 2002.

22 references, page 1 of 2
Abstract
Gray wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park (YNP) in 1995. The population initially flourished, but since 2003 the population has experience significant reductions due to factors that may include disease-induced mortality, illegal hunting, park control pro- grams, vehicle induced deaths and intra-species aggression. Despite facing similar conditions, and interference competition with the wolves, the coyote population at YNP has persisted. In this paper we introduce an epidemiological framework that incorporates natural, human-caused and disease-induced mortality as well as interference competition between two species of predators. The outcomes gen...
Subjects
free text keywords: Quantitative Biology - Populations and Evolution
Related Organizations
Funded by
NSF| REU Site: The Mathematical and Theoretical Biology Institute
Project
  • Funder: National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • Project Code: 1263374
  • Funding stream: Directorate for Mathematical & Physical Sciences | Division of Mathematical Sciences
Download from
22 references, page 1 of 2

[1] Emily S Almberg, Paul C Cross, Andrew P Dobson, Douglas W Smith, and Peter J Hudson. Parasite invasion following host reintroduction: a case study of yellowstone's wolves. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 367(1604):2840{2851, 2012.

[2] Emily S Almberg, Paul C Cross, and Douglas W Smith. Persistence of canine distemper virus in the greater yellowstone ecosystem's carnivore community. Ecological Applications, 20(7):2058{2074, 2010.

[3] Emily S Almberg, L David Mech, Douglas W Smith, Jennifer W Sheldon, and Robert L Crabtree. A serological survey of infectious disease in yellowstone national park's canid community. PLoS One, 4(9):e7042, 2009.

[4] LG Arlian, DL Vyszenski-Moher, and MJ Pole. Survival of adults and developmental stages of sarcoptes scabiei var. canis when o the host. Experimental & applied acarology, 6(3):181{187, 1989.

[5] Kim Murray Berger and Eric M Gese. Does interference competition with wolves limit the distribution and abundance of coyotes? Journal of Animal Ecology, 76(6):1075{1085, 2007.

[6] VA Bokil and CA Manore. Coexistence of competing species with a directly transmitted pathogen. 2010.

[7] Odo Diekmann, JAP Heesterbeek, and Johan AJ Metz. On the de nition and the computation of the basic reproduction ratio r 0 in models for infectious diseases in heterogeneous populations. Journal of Mathematical Biology, 28(4):365{382, 1990.

[8] Daniel Fortin, Hawthorne L Beyer, Mark S Boyce, Douglas W Smith, Thierry Duchesne, and Julie S Mao. Wolves in uence elk movements: behavior shapes a trophic cascade in yellowstone national park. Ecology, 86(5):1320{1330, 2005.

[9] Steven H Fritts, Edward E Bangs, Joseph A Fontaine, Mark R Johnson, Michael K Phillips, Edward D Koch, and John R Gunson. Planning and implementing a reintroduction of wolves to yellowstone national park and central idaho. Restoration Ecology, 5(1):7{27, 1997.

[10] Litao Han and Andrea Pugliese. Epidemics in two competing species. Nonlinear Analysis: Real World Applications, 10(2):723{744, 2009.

[11] Matt W Hayward and Michael Somers. Reintroduction of top-order predators. Number 5. John Wiley & Sons, 2009.

[12] Michael D Jimenez, Edward E Bangs, Carolyn Sime, and Valpa J Asher. Sarcoptic mange found in wolves in the rocky mountains in western united states. Journal of wildlife diseases, 46(4):1120{1125, 2010.

[13] JA Merkle, Daniel R Stahler, and Douglas W Smith. Interference competition between gray wolves and coyotes in yellowstone national park. Canadian Journal of Zoology, 87(1):56{63, 2009.

[15] Danny B Pence and Lamar A Windberg. Impact of a sarcoptic mange epizootic on a coyote population. The Journal of Wildlife Management, pages 624{633, 1994.

[16] DB Pence and E Ueckermann. Sarcoptic manage in wildlife. Revue scienti que et technique (International O ce of Epizootics), 21(2):385{398, 2002.

22 references, page 1 of 2
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