publication . Other literature type . 2009

Suzbijanje geografskog širenja zaraze: kuga u Italiji od 1347.-1851.

Cliff, Andrew D.; Smallman- Raynor, Matthew R.; Stevens, Peta M.;
Open Access English
  • Published: 01 Jan 2009 Journal: Acta medico-historica Adriatica : AMHA, volume 7, issue 2 (issn: 1334-4366, eissn: 1334-6253, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: Croatian scientific society for the history of health culture
Abstract
After the establishment of the first quarantine station in the Republic of Ragusa (modern-day Dubrovnik) in 1377, the states and principalities of Italy developed a sophisticated system of defensive quarantine in an attempt to protect themselves from the ravages of plague. Using largely unknown and unseen historical maps, this paper reconstructs the extent and operation of the system used. It is shown that a cordon sanitaire existed around the coast of Italy for several centuries, consisting of three elements: (i) an outer defensive ring of armed sailing boats in the Mediterranean and the Adriatic, (ii) a middle coastal ring of forts and observation towers, and ...
Subjects
free text keywords: history of medicine; 14th to 19th century; infectious disease; plague; geographical spread; controlling; Italy, povijest medicine; XIV. do XIX. stoljeće; zarazne bolesti; kuga; geografsko širenje; suzbijanje; Italija

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