Gender issues of financial analysts

Preprint OPEN
Jingwen Ge (2013)
  • Subject: gender issues, financial analysts, behavioral pattern of women financial analysts, théorie du genre, analystes financiers, comportements des analystes financiers
    acm: ComputingMilieux_GENERAL | ComputingMilieux_THECOMPUTINGPROFESSION

Increased attention has been drawn to the gender disparity in workplace. This dissertation is dedicated to provide sight to the gender issues in financial analysts. Profound literature reviews are conducted about gender issues and financial analysts, respectively in order to comprehend the existing gender concerns in the business world, and role and functions of financial analysts. Research proposals are described to answer the following question: whether women financial analysts are more likely to be "leader" analysts or "follower" analysts, and whether women financial analysts are less vulnerable to conflicts of interest compared with their male counterparts.
  • References (13)
    13 references, page 1 of 2

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