publication . Preprint . 2011

The Law and Economics of International Cooperation Against Maritime Piracy

Paul Hallwood; Thomas J. Miceli;
Open Access
  • Published: 01 Jun 2011
Abstract
Article 100 of the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea requires signatories to “cooperate” against maritime piracy, but “cooperate” is undefined. Enforcement is a public good – creating uncompensated benefits for others, so suffering from free-rider problems. Our analysis readily explains why more pirates captured are released than prosecuted; why the U.N. and International Maritime Organization are seeking to reduce enforcement costs; why some in the shipping industry want to apply the 1988 Convention against terrorism at sea; and why still others want to move prosecution of pirates out of national courts to an international court.
Subjects
free text keywords: International law, law enforcement, maritime piracy, jel:K14, jel:K33
Related Organizations
25 references, page 1 of 2

Amacost, R.L. (1995), “Cost Reimbursement for USCG International Ice Patrol Activities”, US Coast Guard Report Number CG-D-23-95.

Bahadur, J. (2009), “'I'm not a pirate, I'm the saviour of the sea'”, The Times, April 16th.

Baker, M. and T. Miceli (2005), “Credible Criminal Enforcement”, European Journal of Law and Economics 20: 5-15.

Becker, G. (1968), “Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach”, Journal of Political Economy 76: 1-169-217.

Boadway, R., N. Marceau, and M. Marchand (1996), “Time Consistent Criminal Sanctions”, Public Finance/Finances Publique 51: 149-165.

Bowden, A. (2010), “The Economic Cost of Maritime Piracy”, One Earth Future Foundation, Working Paper, 2010.

Dutton, Y. (2010a), “Pirates and Impunity: Is the Threat of Asylum Claims a Reason to Allow Pirates to Escape Justice?” September 18th, Fordham International Law Journal, forthcoming.

Dutton, Y. M. (2010b), “Bringing Pirates to Justice: A case for including piracy within the jurisdiction of the international criminal court”, Discussion Paper, One Earth Future Foundation, February. http://www.oneearthfuture.org/siteadmin/images/files/file_52.pdf

Hageman, F. (2010), “Strategic Planning for Comprehensive Security in the European Union's Military Operations: EUFOR RD Congo, EUFOR TCHAD/RCA and EUNAVFOR for Somalia”, June, Monterey Naval Post Graduate School.

Hallwood, P. and T. Miceli (2011) “'Keystone Cops' Meet 'Pirates of the Somali Coast': The Failure of International Efforts to Control Maritime Piracy,” Department of Economics Working Paper, University of Connecticut. [OpenAIRE]

IMO (2009), “Djibouti Meeting”, IMO web site, http://www.imo.org/OurWork/Security/PIU/Pages/DCCMeeting.aspx

Kaul, I., Grunberg I. and Stern, M.A. (1999), Global Public Goods: International Cooperation in the 21st Century, Oxford University Press, Oxford

Kindleberger, C. P. (1986), “International Public Goods without International Government.” American Political Review 76(1): 1-13.

Leeson, P. (2007), “An-arrgh-chy: The Law and Economics of Pirate Organization”, Journal of Political Economy 115: 1049-1094.

Minney, T. (2010), “Somali pirates stock exchange finances sea ventures”, African Capital Markets News, April 28th, http://www.africancapitalmarketsnews.com/402/somali-pirates-stock-exchangefinances-sea-ventures/

25 references, page 1 of 2
Powered by OpenAIRE Open Research Graph
Any information missing or wrong?Report an Issue