Part-Time Sick Leave as a Treatment Method?

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Andrén, Daniela ; Andrén, Thomas (2008)
  • Subject: treatment effects | selection | unobserved heterogeneity | part-time sick leave | part-time sick leave, selection, unobserved heterogeneity, treatment effects
    • jel: jel:I12 | jel:J21 | jel:J28

This paper analyzes the effects of being on part-time sick leave compared to full-time sick leave on the probability of recovering (i.e., returning to work with full recovery of lost work capacity). Using a discrete choice one-factor model, we estimate mean treatment parameters and distributional treatment parameters from a common set of structural parameters. Our results show that part-time sick leave increases the likelihood of recovering and dominates full-time sick leave for sickness spells of 150 days or longer. For these long spells, the probability of recovering increases by 10 percentage points.
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