Interactive visual supports for children with autism

Article English OPEN
Hayes, Gillian R. ; Hirano, Sen ; Marcu, Gabriela ; Monibi, Mohamad ; Nguyen, David H. ; Yeganyan, Michael (2010)
  • Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
  • Journal: 663-680 (issn: 1617-4909)
  • Related identifiers: doi: 10.1007/s00779-010-0294-8
  • Subject: Capture and access | Visual supports | Education | Computer Science | User Interfaces and Human Computer Interaction | Personal Computing | Hardware and Architecture | Computer Science Applications | Assistive technology | Computer Science, general | Management Science and Operations Research | Autism

Interventions to support children with autism often include the use of visual supports, which are cognitive tools to enable learning and the production of language. Although visual supports are effective in helping to diminish many of the challenges of autism, they are difficult and time-consuming to create, distribute, and use. In this paper, we present the results of a qualitative study focused on uncovering design guidelines for interactive visual supports that would address the many challenges inherent to current tools and practices. We present three prototype systems that address these design challenges with the use of large group displays, mobile personal devices, and personal recording technologies. We also describe the interventions associated with these prototypes along with the results from two focus group discussions around the interventions. We present further design guidance for visual supports and discuss tensions inherent to their design.
  • References (44)
    44 references, page 1 of 5

    1. Abowd GD, Mynatt ED (2000) Charting past, present and future research in ubiquitous computing. ACM Trans Comput Hum Int 7(1):29-58

    2. American Psychiatric Association (APA) (DC) (1980) APA

    3. American Psychiatric Association (APA) (2000) Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edn, text revision. APA, Washington (DC)

    4. Bondy A, Frost L (2001) A picture's worth PECS and other visual communication strategies in autism. Woodbine House, Bethesda

    5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (2007) Prevalence of autism spectrum disorders-Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, Six Sites, United States, 2000. MMWR Surveill Summ 2007, 56(No.SS-1)

    6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (2007) Prevalence of autism spectrum disorders-Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, 14 Sites, United States, 2002. MMWR Surveill Summ 2007, 56(No.SS-1)

    7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (2009) Prevalence of autism spectrum disorders¯Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, United States, 2006. MMWR Surveill Summ 2009, 58(SS-10)

    8. Charlop-Christy MH, Carpenter M, Le L, LeBlanc LA, Kellet K (2002) Using the picture exchange communication system (PECS) with children with autism: assessment of PECS acquisition, speech, social-communicative behavior, and problem behavior. J Appl Behav Anal 35(3):213-231

    9. Cohen MJ, Sloan DL (2007) Visual supports for people with autism: a guide for parents and professionals. Woodbine House, USA

    10. Dawe M (2006) Desperately seeking simplicity: how young adults with cognitive disabilities and their families adopt assistive technologies. In: Proceedings of the CHI 2006, pp 1143-1152

  • Metrics
    No metrics available
Share - Bookmark