publication . Article . Other literature type . 2017

A longitudinal analysis of the vaginal microbiota and vaginal immune mediators in women from sub-Saharan Africa

Jespers, Vicky; Kyongo, Jordan; Joseph, Sarah; Hardy, Liselotte; Cools, Piet; Crucitti, Tania; Mwaura, Mary; Ndayisaba, Gilles; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Buyze, Jozefien; ...
Open Access English
  • Published: 20 Sep 2017
Abstract
Abstract In cross-sectional studies increased vaginal bacterial diversity has been associated with vaginal inflammation which can be detrimental for health. We describe longitudinal changes at 5 visits over 8 weeks in vaginal microbiota and immune mediators in African women. Women (N = 40) with a normal Nugent score at all visits had a stable lactobacilli dominated microbiota with prevailing Lactobacillus iners. Presence of prostate-specific antigen (proxy for recent sex) and being amenorrhoeic (due to progestin-injectable use), but not recent vaginal cleansing, were significantly associated with microbiota diversity and inflammation (controlled for menstrual cy...
Subjects
free text keywords: Medicine and Health Sciences, Biology and Life Sciences, FEMALE GENITAL-TRACT, BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS, CYTOKINE BIOMARKERS, INNATE IMMUNITY, HIV, EXPRESSION, CONTRACEPTION, ASSOCIATIONS, CHEMOKINES, MARKERS, Bacterial infection, Diagnostic markers, Laboratory techniques and procedures, Medicine, R, Science, Q, Article, Multidisciplinary, Biology, Proinflammatory cytokine, Prevotella bivia, ved/biology.organism_classification_rank.species, ved/biology, Nugent score, Dysbiosis, medicine.disease, Gardnerella vaginalis, medicine.disease_cause, Lactobacillus iners, biology.organism_classification, Immunology, Atopobium vaginae
57 references, page 1 of 4

1. van de Wijgert, J. H. H. M. et al. Th e vaginal microbiota: what have we learned aft er a decade of molecular characterization? PLoS One 9, e105998 (2014).

2. Srinivasan, S. et al. Bacterial communities in women with bacterial vaginosis: high resolution phylogenetic analyses reveal relationships of microbiota to clinical criteria. PLoS One 7, e37818 (2012).

3. Verstraelen, H. et al. Longitudinal analysis of the vaginal microfl ora in pregnancy suggests that L. crispatus promotes the stability of the normal vaginal microfl ora and that L. gasseri and/or L. iners are more conducive to the occurrence of abnormal vaginal microfl ora. BMC Microbiol. 9, 116 (2009).

4. Borgdorf , H. et al. Lactobacillus-dominated cervicovaginal microbiota associated with reduced HIV/STI prevalence and genital HIV viral load in African women. ISME J. 8, 1781-93 (2014).

5. Li, J., McCormick, J., Bocking, A. & Reid, G. Importance of vaginal microbes in reproductive health. Reprod. Sci. 19, 235-42 (2012).

6. Taylor, B. D., Darville, T. & Haggerty, C. L. Does bacterial vaginosis cause pelvic infl ammatory disease? Sex. Transm. Dis. 40, 117-22 (2013).

7. Low, N. et al. Intravaginal practices, bacterial vaginosis, and HIV infection in women: individual participant data meta-analysis. PLoS Med. 8, e1000416 (2011).

8. Atashili, J. et al. Bacterial vaginosis and HIV acquisition: a meta-analysis of published studies. AIDS 22, 1493-1501 (2008). [OpenAIRE]

9. Cohen, C. R. et al. Bacterial vaginosis associated with increased risk of female-to-male HIV-1 transmission: a prospective cohort analysis among African couples. PLoS Med. 9, e1001251 (2012).

10. Frank, D. N. et al. Altered vaginal microbiota are associated with perinatal mother-to-child transmission of HIV in African women from Burkina Faso. J Acquir Immune Defi c Syndr 60, 299-306 (2012).

11. van de Wijgert, J. H. H. M. & Jespers, V. Th e global health impact of vaginal dysbiosis. Res. Microbiol. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j. resmic.2017.02.003 (2017).

12. Anahtar, M. N. et al. Cervicovaginal bacteria are a major modulator of host infl ammatory responses in the female genital tract. Immunity 42, 965-76 (2015). [OpenAIRE]

13. Buve, A., Jespers, V., Crucitti, T. & Fichorova, R. N. Th e vaginal microbiota and susceptibility to HIV. AIDS 28, 2333-44 (2014). [OpenAIRE]

14. Nugent, R. P., Krohn, M. A. & Hillier, S. L. Reliability of diagnosing bacterial vaginosis is improved by a standardized method of gram stain interpretation. J. Clin. Microbiol. 29, 297-301 (1991). [OpenAIRE]

15. Gautam, R. et al. Correlates of the molecular vaginal microbiota composition of African women. BMC Infect. Dis. 15, 86 (2015).

57 references, page 1 of 4
Abstract
Abstract In cross-sectional studies increased vaginal bacterial diversity has been associated with vaginal inflammation which can be detrimental for health. We describe longitudinal changes at 5 visits over 8 weeks in vaginal microbiota and immune mediators in African women. Women (N = 40) with a normal Nugent score at all visits had a stable lactobacilli dominated microbiota with prevailing Lactobacillus iners. Presence of prostate-specific antigen (proxy for recent sex) and being amenorrhoeic (due to progestin-injectable use), but not recent vaginal cleansing, were significantly associated with microbiota diversity and inflammation (controlled for menstrual cy...
Subjects
free text keywords: Medicine and Health Sciences, Biology and Life Sciences, FEMALE GENITAL-TRACT, BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS, CYTOKINE BIOMARKERS, INNATE IMMUNITY, HIV, EXPRESSION, CONTRACEPTION, ASSOCIATIONS, CHEMOKINES, MARKERS, Bacterial infection, Diagnostic markers, Laboratory techniques and procedures, Medicine, R, Science, Q, Article, Multidisciplinary, Biology, Proinflammatory cytokine, Prevotella bivia, ved/biology.organism_classification_rank.species, ved/biology, Nugent score, Dysbiosis, medicine.disease, Gardnerella vaginalis, medicine.disease_cause, Lactobacillus iners, biology.organism_classification, Immunology, Atopobium vaginae
57 references, page 1 of 4

1. van de Wijgert, J. H. H. M. et al. Th e vaginal microbiota: what have we learned aft er a decade of molecular characterization? PLoS One 9, e105998 (2014).

2. Srinivasan, S. et al. Bacterial communities in women with bacterial vaginosis: high resolution phylogenetic analyses reveal relationships of microbiota to clinical criteria. PLoS One 7, e37818 (2012).

3. Verstraelen, H. et al. Longitudinal analysis of the vaginal microfl ora in pregnancy suggests that L. crispatus promotes the stability of the normal vaginal microfl ora and that L. gasseri and/or L. iners are more conducive to the occurrence of abnormal vaginal microfl ora. BMC Microbiol. 9, 116 (2009).

4. Borgdorf , H. et al. Lactobacillus-dominated cervicovaginal microbiota associated with reduced HIV/STI prevalence and genital HIV viral load in African women. ISME J. 8, 1781-93 (2014).

5. Li, J., McCormick, J., Bocking, A. & Reid, G. Importance of vaginal microbes in reproductive health. Reprod. Sci. 19, 235-42 (2012).

6. Taylor, B. D., Darville, T. & Haggerty, C. L. Does bacterial vaginosis cause pelvic infl ammatory disease? Sex. Transm. Dis. 40, 117-22 (2013).

7. Low, N. et al. Intravaginal practices, bacterial vaginosis, and HIV infection in women: individual participant data meta-analysis. PLoS Med. 8, e1000416 (2011).

8. Atashili, J. et al. Bacterial vaginosis and HIV acquisition: a meta-analysis of published studies. AIDS 22, 1493-1501 (2008). [OpenAIRE]

9. Cohen, C. R. et al. Bacterial vaginosis associated with increased risk of female-to-male HIV-1 transmission: a prospective cohort analysis among African couples. PLoS Med. 9, e1001251 (2012).

10. Frank, D. N. et al. Altered vaginal microbiota are associated with perinatal mother-to-child transmission of HIV in African women from Burkina Faso. J Acquir Immune Defi c Syndr 60, 299-306 (2012).

11. van de Wijgert, J. H. H. M. & Jespers, V. Th e global health impact of vaginal dysbiosis. Res. Microbiol. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j. resmic.2017.02.003 (2017).

12. Anahtar, M. N. et al. Cervicovaginal bacteria are a major modulator of host infl ammatory responses in the female genital tract. Immunity 42, 965-76 (2015). [OpenAIRE]

13. Buve, A., Jespers, V., Crucitti, T. & Fichorova, R. N. Th e vaginal microbiota and susceptibility to HIV. AIDS 28, 2333-44 (2014). [OpenAIRE]

14. Nugent, R. P., Krohn, M. A. & Hillier, S. L. Reliability of diagnosing bacterial vaginosis is improved by a standardized method of gram stain interpretation. J. Clin. Microbiol. 29, 297-301 (1991). [OpenAIRE]

15. Gautam, R. et al. Correlates of the molecular vaginal microbiota composition of African women. BMC Infect. Dis. 15, 86 (2015).

57 references, page 1 of 4
Powered by OpenAIRE Open Research Graph
Any information missing or wrong?Report an Issue
publication . Article . Other literature type . 2017

A longitudinal analysis of the vaginal microbiota and vaginal immune mediators in women from sub-Saharan Africa

Jespers, Vicky; Kyongo, Jordan; Joseph, Sarah; Hardy, Liselotte; Cools, Piet; Crucitti, Tania; Mwaura, Mary; Ndayisaba, Gilles; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Buyze, Jozefien; ...