publication . Article . Preprint . Other literature type . 2017

The impact of visual gaze direction on auditory object tracking.

Ulrich Pomper; Maria Chait;
Open Access
  • Published: 05 Jul 2017 Journal: Scientific Reports, volume 7 (eissn: 2045-2322, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
  • Country: United Kingdom
Abstract
<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Subjective experience suggests that we are able to direct our auditory attention independent of our visual gaze, e.g when shadowing a nearby conversation at a cocktail party. But what are the consequences at the behavioural and neural level? While numerous studies have investigated both auditory attention and visual gaze independently, little is known about their interaction during selective listening. In the present EEG study, we manipulated visual gaze independently of auditory attention while participants detected targets presented from one of three loudspeakers. We observed increased response times when gaze was direc...
Subjects
Medical Subject Headings: genetic structures
free text keywords: Multidisciplinary, Article
Related Organizations
Funded by
EC| COCOHA
Project
COCOHA
Cognitive Control of a Hearing Aid
  • Funder: European Commission (EC)
  • Project Code: 644732
  • Funding stream: H2020 | RIA
60 references, page 1 of 4

1. Henderson, J. M. Human gaze control during real-world scene perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7, 498-504 (2003).

2. Land, M. F. Motion and vision: Why animals move their eyes. Journal of Comparative Physiology - A Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology 185, 341-352 (1999).

3. Braga, R. M., Fu, R. Z., Seemungal, B. M., Wise, R. J. S. & Leech, R. Eye Movements during Auditory Attention Predict Individual Diefrences in Dorsal Attention Network Activity. Frontiers 10, 1-13 (2016).

4. Rorden, C. & Driver, J. Does auditory attention shift in the direction of an upcoming saccade ? . Neuropsychologia 37, 357-377 (1999).

5. Gopher, D. & Kahneman, D. Individual diefrences in attention and the prediction of iflght criteria. Percept. Mot. Skills 33, 1335-1342 (1971).

6. Gopher, D. Eye-movement patterns in selective listening tasks of focused attention. Percept. Psychophys. 14, 259-264 (1973). [OpenAIRE]

7. Werner Reiss, U., Kelly, K., Trause, A. S., Underhill, A. M. & Groh, J. M. Eye Position Aefcts Activity in Primary Auditory Cortex of Primates. Curr. Biol. 13, 554-562 (2003).

8. Groh, J. M., Trause, A. S., Underhill, A. M., Clark, K. R. & Inati, S. Eye position inuflences auditory responses in primate inferior colliculus. Neuron 29, 509-518 (2001). [OpenAIRE]

9. Maddox, R. K., Pospisil, D. A., Stecker, G. C. & Lee, A. K. C. Directing eye gaze enhances auditory spatial cue discrimination. Curr. Biol. 24, 748-752 (2014).

10. Hillyard, S. a., Hink, R. F., Schwent, V. L. & Picton, T. W. Electrical signs of selective attention in the human brain. Science 182, 177-180 (1973). [OpenAIRE]

11. Woldorf, M. G. et al . Modulation of early sensory processing in human auditory cortex during auditory selective attention. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 90, 8722-8726 (1993).

12. Woldorf, M. G. & Hillyard, S. A. Modulation of early auditory processing during selective listening to rapidly presented tones. Electroencephalogr. Clin. Neurophysiol. 79, 170-191 (1991).

13. Herrmann, C. S. & Knight, R. T. Mechanisms of human attention: Event-related potentials and oscillations. in. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 25, 465-476 (2001).

14. Teder-Sälejärvi, W. a., Hillyard, S. a., Röder, B. & Neville, H. J. Spatial attention to central and peripheral auditory stimuli as indexed by event-related potentials. Brain Res. Cogn. Brain Res. 8, 213-227 (1999).

15. Spence, C., Pavini, F. & Driver, J. Crossmodal links between vision and touch in covert endogenous spatial attention. J. Exp. Psychol. Hum. Percept. Perform. 26, 1298-1319 (2000).

60 references, page 1 of 4
Abstract
<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Subjective experience suggests that we are able to direct our auditory attention independent of our visual gaze, e.g when shadowing a nearby conversation at a cocktail party. But what are the consequences at the behavioural and neural level? While numerous studies have investigated both auditory attention and visual gaze independently, little is known about their interaction during selective listening. In the present EEG study, we manipulated visual gaze independently of auditory attention while participants detected targets presented from one of three loudspeakers. We observed increased response times when gaze was direc...
Subjects
Medical Subject Headings: genetic structures
free text keywords: Multidisciplinary, Article
Related Organizations
Funded by
EC| COCOHA
Project
COCOHA
Cognitive Control of a Hearing Aid
  • Funder: European Commission (EC)
  • Project Code: 644732
  • Funding stream: H2020 | RIA
60 references, page 1 of 4

1. Henderson, J. M. Human gaze control during real-world scene perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7, 498-504 (2003).

2. Land, M. F. Motion and vision: Why animals move their eyes. Journal of Comparative Physiology - A Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology 185, 341-352 (1999).

3. Braga, R. M., Fu, R. Z., Seemungal, B. M., Wise, R. J. S. & Leech, R. Eye Movements during Auditory Attention Predict Individual Diefrences in Dorsal Attention Network Activity. Frontiers 10, 1-13 (2016).

4. Rorden, C. & Driver, J. Does auditory attention shift in the direction of an upcoming saccade ? . Neuropsychologia 37, 357-377 (1999).

5. Gopher, D. & Kahneman, D. Individual diefrences in attention and the prediction of iflght criteria. Percept. Mot. Skills 33, 1335-1342 (1971).

6. Gopher, D. Eye-movement patterns in selective listening tasks of focused attention. Percept. Psychophys. 14, 259-264 (1973). [OpenAIRE]

7. Werner Reiss, U., Kelly, K., Trause, A. S., Underhill, A. M. & Groh, J. M. Eye Position Aefcts Activity in Primary Auditory Cortex of Primates. Curr. Biol. 13, 554-562 (2003).

8. Groh, J. M., Trause, A. S., Underhill, A. M., Clark, K. R. & Inati, S. Eye position inuflences auditory responses in primate inferior colliculus. Neuron 29, 509-518 (2001). [OpenAIRE]

9. Maddox, R. K., Pospisil, D. A., Stecker, G. C. & Lee, A. K. C. Directing eye gaze enhances auditory spatial cue discrimination. Curr. Biol. 24, 748-752 (2014).

10. Hillyard, S. a., Hink, R. F., Schwent, V. L. & Picton, T. W. Electrical signs of selective attention in the human brain. Science 182, 177-180 (1973). [OpenAIRE]

11. Woldorf, M. G. et al . Modulation of early sensory processing in human auditory cortex during auditory selective attention. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 90, 8722-8726 (1993).

12. Woldorf, M. G. & Hillyard, S. A. Modulation of early auditory processing during selective listening to rapidly presented tones. Electroencephalogr. Clin. Neurophysiol. 79, 170-191 (1991).

13. Herrmann, C. S. & Knight, R. T. Mechanisms of human attention: Event-related potentials and oscillations. in. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 25, 465-476 (2001).

14. Teder-Sälejärvi, W. a., Hillyard, S. a., Röder, B. & Neville, H. J. Spatial attention to central and peripheral auditory stimuli as indexed by event-related potentials. Brain Res. Cogn. Brain Res. 8, 213-227 (1999).

15. Spence, C., Pavini, F. & Driver, J. Crossmodal links between vision and touch in covert endogenous spatial attention. J. Exp. Psychol. Hum. Percept. Perform. 26, 1298-1319 (2000).

60 references, page 1 of 4
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