Electric Vehicle Charging Modeling

Doctoral thesis English OPEN
Grahn, Pia (2014)
  • Publisher: Stockholm

With an electrified passenger transportation fleet, carbon dioxide emissions could be reduced significantly depending on the electric power production mix. Increased electric power consumption due to electric vehicle charging demands of electric vehicle fleets may be met by increased amount of renewable power production in the electrical systems. With electric vehicle fleets in the transportation system there is a need for establishing an electric vehicle charging infrastructure that distributes this power to the electric vehicles. Depending on the amount of electric vehicles in the system and the charging patterns, electric vehicle integration creates new quantities in the overall load profile that may increase the load peaks. The electric vehicle charging patterns are stochastic since they are affected by the travel behavior of the driver and the charging opportunities which implies that an electric vehicle introduction also will affect load variations. Increased load variation and load peaks may create a need for upgrades in the grid infrastructure to reduce losses, risks for overloads or damaging of components. However, with well-designed incentives for electric vehicle users and electric vehicle charging, the electric vehicles may be used as flexible loads that can help mitigate load variations and load peaks in the power system. The aim with this doctoral thesis is to investigate and quantify the impact of electric vehicle charging on load profiles and load variations. Three key factors are identified when considering the impact of electric vehicle charging on load profiles and load variations. The key factors are: The charging moment, the charging need and the charging location. One of the conclusions in this thesis is that the level of details and the approach to model these key factors impact the estimations of the load profiles. The models that take into account a high level of mobility details will be able to create a realistic estimation of a future uncontrolled charging behavior, enabling for more accurate estimates of the impact on load profiles and the potential of individual charging strategies and external charging strategies. The thesis reviews and categorizes electric vehicle charging models in previous research, and furthermore, introduces new electric vehicle charging models to estimate the charging impact based on charging patterns induced by passenger car travel behavior. The models mainly consider EVC related to individual car travel behavior and induced charging needs for plug-in-hybrid electric vehicles. Moreover, the thesis comments on dynamic electric vehicle charging along electrified roads and also on individual charging strategies. <p>QC 20140924</p>
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