publication . Article . Other literature type . 2004

Automatic and controlled processing in sentence recall: The role of long-term and working memory

Elizabeth Jefferies; Matthew A. Lambon Ralph; Alan D. Baddeley;
Open Access English
  • Published: 01 Nov 2004
  • Country: New Zealand
Abstract
Immediate serial recall is better for sentences than word lists presumably because of the additional support that meaningful material receives from long-term memory. This may occur automatically, without the involvement of attention, or may require additional attentionally demanding processing. For example, the episodic buffer model (Baddeley, 2000) proposes that the executive component of working memory plays a crucial role in the formation of links between different representational formats and previously unrelated concepts. This controlled integrative encoding may be more important in sentence than word recall. Three experiments examined the effect of an atte...
Subjects
free text keywords: Chunking, Episodic buffer, Prose memory, Sentence span, Working memory, /dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/1200/1203, Language and Linguistics, /dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/3200/3205, Experimental and Cognitive Psychology, /dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/3300/3310, Linguistics and Language, Recall test, Psychology, Levels-of-processing effect, Serial position effect, Short-term memory, Sentence, Free recall, Communication, business.industry, business, Encoding specificity principle, Recall, Cognitive psychology
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publication . Article . Other literature type . 2004

Automatic and controlled processing in sentence recall: The role of long-term and working memory

Elizabeth Jefferies; Matthew A. Lambon Ralph; Alan D. Baddeley;