publication . Article . 2012

Accounting for immediate emotional memory enhancement

Deborah Talmi; Lucy M. McGarry;
Open Access English
  • Published: 01 Jan 2012
  • Country: Switzerland
Abstract
Memory for items that are moderately emotional, such as images of violence, is usually very good. Human participants exhibit emotionally-enhanced memory (EEM) even when memory is tested shortly after study, before the effect of emotional arousal on long-term memory consolidation can influence memory performance. The goal of this study was to account for this effect by considering the way emotion alters the cognitive processes that occur during encoding and retrieval. Previous work demonstrated that organization and distinctiveness are necessary to account for this effect, but despite the fact that emotional stimuli are preferentially attended, whether attention ...
Subjects
free text keywords: Distinctiveness, Divided attention, Emotion, Free recall memory, Semantic relatedness, /dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/1200/1203, Language and Linguistics, /dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/3200/3205, Experimental and Cognitive Psychology, /dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/3300/3310, Linguistics and Language, /dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/1700/1702, Artificial Intelligence, /dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/3200/3206, Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology, Recall test, Developmental psychology, Recall, Reconstructive memory, Levels-of-processing effect, Free recall, Cognitive psychology, Memory errors, Childhood memory, Semantic memory, Psychology
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publication . Article . 2012

Accounting for immediate emotional memory enhancement

Deborah Talmi; Lucy M. McGarry;