Job and Work Design

Part of book or chapter of book English OPEN
Van den Broeck, Anja ; Parker, Sharon K. (2017)
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Related identifiers: doi: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190236557.013.15
  • Subject: job design, work design, job characteristics, autonomy, workload, well-being, health, commitment, satisfaction, performance, proactivity, innovation
    acm: ComputingMilieux_THECOMPUTINGPROFESSION

Job design or work design refers to the content, structure, and organization of tasks and activities. It is mostly studied in terms of job characteristics, such as autonomy, workload, role problems, and feedback. Throughout history, job design has moved away from a sole focus on efficiency and productivity to more motivational job designs, including the social approach toward work, Herzberg’s two-factor model, Hackman and Oldham’s job characteristics model, the job demand control model of Karasek, Warr’s vitamin model, and the job demands resources model of Bakker and Demerouti. The models make it clear that a variety of job characteristics make up the quality of job design that benefits employees and employers alike. Job design is crucial for a whole range of outcomes, including (a) employee health and well-being, (b) attitudes like job satisfaction and commitment, (c) employee cognitions and learning, and (d) behaviors like productivity, absenteeism, proactivity, and innovation. Employee personal characteristics play an important role in job design. They influence how employees themselves perceive and seek out particular job characteristics, help in understanding how job design exerts its influence, and have the potential to change the impact of job design.
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