publication . Article . 2009

Threat Related Selective Attention Predicts Treatment Success in Childhood Anxiety Disorders.

Legerstee, Jeroen; Tulen, Joke; Kallen, Victor; Dieleman, Gwen; Treffers, Philip; Verhulst, Frank; Utens, Elisabeth;
Open Access
  • Published: 01 Feb 2009 Journal: Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, volume 48, pages 196-205 (issn: 0890-8567, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: Elsevier BV
  • Country: Netherlands
Abstract
Objective: The present study examined whether threat-related selective attention was predictive of treatment success in children with anxiety disorders and whether age moderated this association. Specific components of selective attention were examined in treatment responders and nonresponders. Method: Participants consisted of 131 children with anxiety disorders (aged 8Y16 years), who received standardized cognitive-behavioral therapy. At pretreatment, a pictorial dotprobe task was administered to assess selective attention. Both at pretreatment and posttreatment, diagnostic status of the children was evaluated with a semistructured clinical interview (the Anxi...
Subjects
free text keywords: Developmental and Educational Psychology, Psychiatry and Mental health, Predictive value of tests, Psychiatry, medicine.medical_specialty, medicine, Avoidance learning, Clinical psychology, Clinical interview, Clinical trial, Cognitive therapy, medicine.medical_treatment, Anxiety, medicine.symptom, Selective attention, Cognitive restructuring, Psychology, *Attention, *Avoidance Learning, *Cognitive Therapy, Adolescent, Age Factors, Anxiety Disorders/*diagnosis/psychology/therapy, Child, Female, Humans, Interview, Psychological, Male, Prognosis, Treatment Outcome
Related Organizations
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publication . Article . 2009

Threat Related Selective Attention Predicts Treatment Success in Childhood Anxiety Disorders.

Legerstee, Jeroen; Tulen, Joke; Kallen, Victor; Dieleman, Gwen; Treffers, Philip; Verhulst, Frank; Utens, Elisabeth;