publication . Doctoral thesis . Other literature type . 2013

Detection of early squats by axle box acceleration

Molodova, M.;
Open Access English
  • Published: 09 Jan 2013
  • Country: Netherlands
Abstract
This thesis discusses a new method for detection of short track irregularities, particularly squats, with axle box acceleration (ABA) measurements. A squat is a surface initiated short track defect, associated with high frequency vibrations of the wheel-rail system. High stresses in the contact patch at squats cause accumulation of plastic deformation of the rail and growth of cracks. Cracks growing in the subsurface can cause a rail fracture. Light squats can be treated by grinding of the rail surface; while mature squats lead to replacement of the rail section. For cost effective maintenance policy and operational safety squats should be detected at an early s...
Subjects
free text keywords: axle box acceleration, squat, railway track inspection, dynamic simulations, finite element method
Download fromView all 3 versions
TU Delft Repository
Doctoral thesis . 2013
Provider: NARCIS
NARCIS
Doctoral thesis . 2013
Provider: NARCIS
http://dx.doi.org/None...
Other literature type . 2013
Provider: Datacite
34 references, page 1 of 3

6.  IMPROVEMENTS OF THE ABA MEASURING SYSTEM .............................................. 79  6.1.  Introduction ........................................................................................................ 79  6.2.  Wheel vibrations ................................................................................................ 79  6.2.1.  Modes of vibration of the wheel ............................................................ 79  6.2.2.  Transfer function .................................................................................... 81  6.3.  ABA measurements with improved instrumentation ........................................ 83  6.4.  Improvement of signal processing of ABA ......................................................... 84  6.4.1.  Noise reduction ...................................................................................... 84  6.4.2.  Effect of noise reduction on the detection of light squats .................... 85  6.4.3.  Reduction of the influence of wheels' defect on ABA ........................... 87  6.5.  Hit rate of light squats ........................................................................................ 90  6.6.  Conclusions ......................................................................................................... 90 

[13]   D. F. Cannon and H. Pradier, “Rail rolling contact fatigue Research by the European Rail  Research Institute,” Wear, vol. 191, no. 1-2, pp. 1-13, Jan. 1996. 

[14]   S.  Bogdanski,  M.  Olzak,  and  J.  Stupnicki,  “Numerical  stress  analysis  of  rail  rolling  contact fatigue cracks,” Wear, vol. 191, no. 1-2, pp. 14-24, Jan. 1996. 

[15]   S. Bogdanski, M. Olzak, and J. Stupnicki, “Numerical modelling of a 3D rail RCF 'squat'‐ type  crack  under  operating  load,”  Fatigue  &  Fracture  of  Engineering  Materials  &  Structures, vol. 21, no. 8, pp. 923-935, Aug. 1998. 

[16]   S.  Bogdanski  and  P.  Lewicki,  “3D  model  of  liquid  entrapment  mechanism  for  rolling  contact fatigue cracks in rails,” Wear, vol. 265, no. 9-10, pp. 1356-1362, Oct. 2008. 

[17]   Z.  Li,  X.  Zhao,  C.  Esveld,  R.  Dollevoet,  and  M.  Molodova,  “An  investigation  into  the  causes of squats-Correlation analysis and numerical modeling,” Wear, vol. 265, no. 9- 10, pp. 1349-1355, Oct. 2008. 

[18]   Z. Li, X. Zhao, and R. Dollevoet, “The determination of a critical size for rail top surface  defects  to  grow  into  squats,”  in  Proceedings  of  the  8th  International  Conference  on  Contact Mechanics and Wear of Rail/Wheel Systems (CM2009), Florence, Italy, 2009. 

[19]   Z.  Li,  X.  Zhao,  R.  Dollevoet,  and  M.  Molodova,  “Differential  wear  and  plastic  deformation  as  causes  of  squat  at  track  local  stiffness  change  combined  with  other  track short defects,” Vehicle System Dynamics, vol. 46, pp. 237-246, 2008.  [OpenAIRE]

[20]   A.  F.  Bower  and  K.  L.  Johnson,  “Plastic  flow  and  shakedown  of  the  rail  surface  in  repeated wheel‐rail contact,” Wear, vol. 144, no. 1-2, pp. 1-18, Apr. 1991. 

[24]   J.  C.  O.  Nielsen,  “High‐frequency  vertical  wheel‐rail  contact  forces‐‐Validation  of  a  prediction model by field testing,” Wear, vol. 265, no. 9-10, pp. 1465-1471, Oct. 2008. 

[25]   A.  Berry,  B.  Nejikovsky,  X.  Gibert,  and  A.  Tajaddini,  “High  Speed  Video  Inspection  of  Joint Bars Using Advanced Image Collection and Processing Techniques,” in Proceedings  of the 8th World Congress on Railway research, Seoul, Korea, 2008. 

[26]   C. Delprete and C. Rosso, “An easy instrument and a methodology for the monitoring  and  the  diagnosis  of  a  rail,”  Mechanical  Systems  and  Signal  Processing,  vol.  23,  no.  3,  pp. 940-956, Apr. 2009. 

[27]   S.  L.  Grassie,  “Short  wavelength  rail  corrugation:  field  trials  and  measuring  technology,” Wear, vol. 191, no. 1-2, pp. 149-160, Jan. 1996. 

[28]   S. L. Grassie, “Measurement of railhead longitudinal profiles: a comparison of different  techniques,” Wear, vol. 191, no. 1-2, pp. 245-251, Jan. 1996. 

[29]   R.  B.  Lewis,  “Track‐recording  techniques  used  on  British  Rail,”  Electric  Power  Applications, IEE Proceedings B, vol. 131, no. 3, p. 73, 1984. 

34 references, page 1 of 3
Any information missing or wrong?Report an Issue