publication . Doctoral thesis . 2016

A license to mine?: Community organizing against multinational corporations

Krämer, Romy;
Open Access English
  • Published: 18 Nov 2016
  • Publisher: Erasmus University Rotterdam
Abstract
textabstractWhat does it mean when a corporation claims to have a ‘license to operate’ in a local community? How does a member of an indigenous tribe make it to London to protest against a multinational mining company? How do managers perceive and speak about protest against their company and how does this discourse matter for social movement repression? First, I argue, based on a literature review, that responsiveness to local community needs has become an important factor influencing the ability of multinational enterprises to successfully internationalize their operations. Then, I explore the practitioner concept of the license to operate and develop this int...
Subjects
free text keywords: anti-corporate resistance, movement process, CSR, anti-corporate movements, license to operate, translocal movements, astroturf organizing, mining industry
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4.6 Findings 79 4.6.1 Local resistance (2002-2003) 80 4.6.2 NAN support and emerging international interest (end 2003-early 2006) 82 4.6.3 Rapid internationalization (2006-2008) 84 4.6.4 Conflict and re-localization (2006-2008) 88 4.7 Discussion and Conclusion 97 4.8 Epilogue 104

5. "OUTSIDE INSTIGATORS'' AND "CRIMINALS" 107 5.1 Abstract 107 5.2 Introduction 107 5.3 Frames, Framing and Framing Contests 111 5.4 Introducing Two Adversarial Master Frames 117 5.5 Effects of Framing 124 5.6 Case and Method 126 5.7 Findings 130 5.7.1 Minerals-based development - a cure for the Maoist threat? 130 5.7.2 Outside instigators and criminals - Framing resistance against the mine in

Niyamgiri 132 5.7.3 “I told them I was not a Maoist.” 135 5.8 Discussion 5.8.1 The outsider frame 5.8.2 The criminal frame 5.8.3 Frame adaptation 5.8.4 Theoretical implications 5.8.5 Practical implications 5.8.6 Limitations and future research

6. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION 6.1 Summary 6.1.1 A license to operate for the extractive industries?

H.W.G.M. van Heck & Prof. P.H.M. Vervest, EPS-2014-315-LIS, http://repub.eur.nl/pub/

EPS-2014-330-F&A, http://repub.eur.nl/pub/77154

de Vrande, EPS-2016-381-S&E, http://repub.eur.nl/pub/93176

& Prof. P.G.J. Roosenboom, EPS-2015-352-F&A, http://repub.eur.nl/pub/78301

Abstract
textabstractWhat does it mean when a corporation claims to have a ‘license to operate’ in a local community? How does a member of an indigenous tribe make it to London to protest against a multinational mining company? How do managers perceive and speak about protest against their company and how does this discourse matter for social movement repression? First, I argue, based on a literature review, that responsiveness to local community needs has become an important factor influencing the ability of multinational enterprises to successfully internationalize their operations. Then, I explore the practitioner concept of the license to operate and develop this int...
Subjects
free text keywords: anti-corporate resistance, movement process, CSR, anti-corporate movements, license to operate, translocal movements, astroturf organizing, mining industry
Download from

4.6 Findings 79 4.6.1 Local resistance (2002-2003) 80 4.6.2 NAN support and emerging international interest (end 2003-early 2006) 82 4.6.3 Rapid internationalization (2006-2008) 84 4.6.4 Conflict and re-localization (2006-2008) 88 4.7 Discussion and Conclusion 97 4.8 Epilogue 104

5. "OUTSIDE INSTIGATORS'' AND "CRIMINALS" 107 5.1 Abstract 107 5.2 Introduction 107 5.3 Frames, Framing and Framing Contests 111 5.4 Introducing Two Adversarial Master Frames 117 5.5 Effects of Framing 124 5.6 Case and Method 126 5.7 Findings 130 5.7.1 Minerals-based development - a cure for the Maoist threat? 130 5.7.2 Outside instigators and criminals - Framing resistance against the mine in

Niyamgiri 132 5.7.3 “I told them I was not a Maoist.” 135 5.8 Discussion 5.8.1 The outsider frame 5.8.2 The criminal frame 5.8.3 Frame adaptation 5.8.4 Theoretical implications 5.8.5 Practical implications 5.8.6 Limitations and future research

6. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION 6.1 Summary 6.1.1 A license to operate for the extractive industries?

H.W.G.M. van Heck & Prof. P.H.M. Vervest, EPS-2014-315-LIS, http://repub.eur.nl/pub/

EPS-2014-330-F&A, http://repub.eur.nl/pub/77154

de Vrande, EPS-2016-381-S&E, http://repub.eur.nl/pub/93176

& Prof. P.G.J. Roosenboom, EPS-2015-352-F&A, http://repub.eur.nl/pub/78301

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