Marxism as permanent revolution

Article English OPEN
van Ree, E.;
(2013)

This article argues that the 'permanent revolution' represented the dominant element in Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels' political discourse, and that it tended to overrule considerations encapsulated in 'historical materialism'. In Marx and Engels's understanding, perma... View more
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    40 references, page 1 of 4

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