publication . Other literature type . Article . 2016

Kin Signatures Learned in the Egg? Red-Backed Fairy-Wren Songs Are Similar to Their Mother's In-Nest Calls and Songs

Jenélle L. Dowling; Diane Colombelli-Négrel; Michael S. Webster;
Open Access
  • Published: 06 May 2016
  • Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Abstract
Many vocal animals recognize kin using vocal cues, in territorial contexts and in rearing young, but little is known about the developmental and evolutionary mechanisms that produce vocal kin recognition systems. In the cooperatively breeding red-backed fairy-wren (Malurus melanocephalus), females give specific “in-nest calls” while incubating their eggs. Elements from these calls are incorporated into chicks’ begging calls, and appear to be used by parents for recognition. This is likely a result of an embryo’s ability to learn the call elements in the egg. Here, we explore the idea that maternal vocal elements may be incorporated into offspring’s adult songs, ...
Persistent Identifiers
Subjects
Medical Subject Headings: behavior and behavior mechanismsanimal structuresotorhinolaryngologic diseases
free text keywords: Ecology and Evolution, kin signatures, female song, in-nest calls, embryonic learning, songbirds, Malurus melanocephalus, Biology, Offspring, Begging, Vocal cues, Adult offspring, biology.organism_classification, Communication, business.industry, business, Kinship, Nest, Kin recognition
Related Organizations
46 references, page 1 of 4

Akcay C. Swift R. J. Reed V. A. Dickinson J. L. (2013). Vocal kin recognition in kin neighborhoods of western bluebirds. Behav. Ecol. 24, 898–905. 10.1093/beheco/art018 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Amo L. Tomás G. Parejo D. Avilés J. M. (2014). Are female starlings able to recognize the scent of their offspring? PLoS ONE 9:e109505. 10.1371/journal.pone.0109505 25299305 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Baker M. C. Logue D. M. (2003). Population differentiation in a complex bird sound: a comparison of three bioacoustical analysis procedures. Ethology 109, 223–242. 10.1046/j.1439-0310.2003.00866.x [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Beecher M. D. (1988). Kin recognition in birds. Behav. Genet. 18, 465–482. 10.1007/BF01065515 3056385 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Brainard M. S. Doupe A. J. (2002). What songbirds teach us about learning. Nature 417, 351–358. 10.1038/417351a 12015616 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Burnham K. P. Anderson D. R. (2002). Model Selection and Multimodel Inference: A Practical Information-Theoretic Approach, 2nd Edn. New York, NY: Pringer-Verlag.

Casgrain P. Legendre P. (2001). The R Package for Multivariate and Spatial Analysis, Version 4.0 d6 User's Manual. Département de Sciences Biologiques, Université de Montréal. Available online at: http://www.fas.umontreal.ca/BIOL/legendre

Caspers B. A. Hoffman J. I. Kohlmeier P. Krüger O. Krause E. T. (2013). Olfactory imprinting as a mechanism for nest odour recognit ion in zebra finches. Anim. Behav. 86, 85–90. 10.1016/j.anbehav.2013.04.015 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Clark C. W. Marler P. Beaman K. (1987). Quantitative analysis of animal vocal phonology: an application to swamp sparrow song. Ethology 76, 101–115. 10.1111/j.1439-0310.1987.tb00676.x [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Colombelli-Négrel D. Hauber M. E. Kleindorfer S. (2014). Prenatal learning in an Australian songbird: habituation and individual discrimination in superb fairy-wren embryos. Proc. Biol. Sci. 281:20141154. 10.1098/rspb.2014.1154 25355472 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Colombelli-Négrel D. Hauber M. E. Robertson J. Sulloway F. J. Hoi H. Griggio M. . (2012). Embryonic learning of vocal passwords in superb fairy-wrens reveals intruder cuckoo nestlings. Curr. Biol. 22, 2155–2160. 10.1016/j.cub.2012.09.025 23142041 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Colombelli-Négrel D. Webster M. S. Dowling J. L. Hauber M. E. Kleindorfer S. (2016). Vocal imitation of mother's calls by begging Red-backed Fairy-wren nestlings increases parental provisioning. Auk 133, 273–285. 10.1642/AUK-15-162.1 [DOI]

Dowling J. Webster M. S. (2016). An experimental test of duet function in a fairy-wren (Malurus) with moderate cuckoldry rates. Behav. Ecol. 2, 228–236. 10.1093/beheco/arv144 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Ellis J. M. S. (2008). Decay of apparent individual distinctiveness in the begging calls of adult female white-throated magpie-jays. Condor 110, 648–657. 10.1525/cond.2008.8592 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Evans C. Kleindorfer S. (2016). Superb fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus) sons and daughters acquire song elements of mothers and social fathers. Front. Ecol. Evol. 4:9. 10.3389/fevo.2016.00009 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

46 references, page 1 of 4
Abstract
Many vocal animals recognize kin using vocal cues, in territorial contexts and in rearing young, but little is known about the developmental and evolutionary mechanisms that produce vocal kin recognition systems. In the cooperatively breeding red-backed fairy-wren (Malurus melanocephalus), females give specific “in-nest calls” while incubating their eggs. Elements from these calls are incorporated into chicks’ begging calls, and appear to be used by parents for recognition. This is likely a result of an embryo’s ability to learn the call elements in the egg. Here, we explore the idea that maternal vocal elements may be incorporated into offspring’s adult songs, ...
Persistent Identifiers
Subjects
Medical Subject Headings: behavior and behavior mechanismsanimal structuresotorhinolaryngologic diseases
free text keywords: Ecology and Evolution, kin signatures, female song, in-nest calls, embryonic learning, songbirds, Malurus melanocephalus, Biology, Offspring, Begging, Vocal cues, Adult offspring, biology.organism_classification, Communication, business.industry, business, Kinship, Nest, Kin recognition
Related Organizations
46 references, page 1 of 4

Akcay C. Swift R. J. Reed V. A. Dickinson J. L. (2013). Vocal kin recognition in kin neighborhoods of western bluebirds. Behav. Ecol. 24, 898–905. 10.1093/beheco/art018 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Amo L. Tomás G. Parejo D. Avilés J. M. (2014). Are female starlings able to recognize the scent of their offspring? PLoS ONE 9:e109505. 10.1371/journal.pone.0109505 25299305 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Baker M. C. Logue D. M. (2003). Population differentiation in a complex bird sound: a comparison of three bioacoustical analysis procedures. Ethology 109, 223–242. 10.1046/j.1439-0310.2003.00866.x [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Beecher M. D. (1988). Kin recognition in birds. Behav. Genet. 18, 465–482. 10.1007/BF01065515 3056385 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Brainard M. S. Doupe A. J. (2002). What songbirds teach us about learning. Nature 417, 351–358. 10.1038/417351a 12015616 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Burnham K. P. Anderson D. R. (2002). Model Selection and Multimodel Inference: A Practical Information-Theoretic Approach, 2nd Edn. New York, NY: Pringer-Verlag.

Casgrain P. Legendre P. (2001). The R Package for Multivariate and Spatial Analysis, Version 4.0 d6 User's Manual. Département de Sciences Biologiques, Université de Montréal. Available online at: http://www.fas.umontreal.ca/BIOL/legendre

Caspers B. A. Hoffman J. I. Kohlmeier P. Krüger O. Krause E. T. (2013). Olfactory imprinting as a mechanism for nest odour recognit ion in zebra finches. Anim. Behav. 86, 85–90. 10.1016/j.anbehav.2013.04.015 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Clark C. W. Marler P. Beaman K. (1987). Quantitative analysis of animal vocal phonology: an application to swamp sparrow song. Ethology 76, 101–115. 10.1111/j.1439-0310.1987.tb00676.x [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Colombelli-Négrel D. Hauber M. E. Kleindorfer S. (2014). Prenatal learning in an Australian songbird: habituation and individual discrimination in superb fairy-wren embryos. Proc. Biol. Sci. 281:20141154. 10.1098/rspb.2014.1154 25355472 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Colombelli-Négrel D. Hauber M. E. Robertson J. Sulloway F. J. Hoi H. Griggio M. . (2012). Embryonic learning of vocal passwords in superb fairy-wrens reveals intruder cuckoo nestlings. Curr. Biol. 22, 2155–2160. 10.1016/j.cub.2012.09.025 23142041 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Colombelli-Négrel D. Webster M. S. Dowling J. L. Hauber M. E. Kleindorfer S. (2016). Vocal imitation of mother's calls by begging Red-backed Fairy-wren nestlings increases parental provisioning. Auk 133, 273–285. 10.1642/AUK-15-162.1 [DOI]

Dowling J. Webster M. S. (2016). An experimental test of duet function in a fairy-wren (Malurus) with moderate cuckoldry rates. Behav. Ecol. 2, 228–236. 10.1093/beheco/arv144 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Ellis J. M. S. (2008). Decay of apparent individual distinctiveness in the begging calls of adult female white-throated magpie-jays. Condor 110, 648–657. 10.1525/cond.2008.8592 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Evans C. Kleindorfer S. (2016). Superb fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus) sons and daughters acquire song elements of mothers and social fathers. Front. Ecol. Evol. 4:9. 10.3389/fevo.2016.00009 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

46 references, page 1 of 4
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