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Publication . Article . 2016

Manipulation of Ovarian Function Significantly Influenced Sarcopenia in Postreproductive-Age Mice

Peterson, Rhett L.; Parkinson, Kate C.; Mason, Jeffrey B.;
Open Access   English  
Published: 01 Sep 2016 Journal: Journal of Transplantation (issn: 2090-0007, Copyright policy )
Publisher: Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Abstract
Previously, transplantation of ovaries from young cycling mice into old postreproductive-age mice increased life span. We anticipated that the same factors that increased life span could also influence health span. Female CBA/J mice received new (60 d) ovaries at 12 and 17 months of age and were evaluated at 16 and 25 months of age, respectively. There were no significant differences in body weight among any age or treatment group. The percentage of fat mass was significantly increased at 13 and 16 months of age but was reduced by ovarian transplantation in 16-month-old mice. The percentages of lean body mass and total body water were significantly reduced in 13-month-old control mice but were restored in 16- and 25-month-old recipient mice by ovarian transplantation to the levels found in six-month-old control mice. In summary, we have shown that skeletal muscle mass, which is negatively influenced by aging, can be positively influenced or restored by reestablishment of active ovarian function in aged female mice. These findings provide strong incentive for further investigation of the positive influence of young ovaries on restoration of health in postreproductive females.
Subjects by Vocabulary

Microsoft Academic Graph classification: Transplantation Internal medicine medicine.medical_specialty medicine business.industry business Ovarian transplantation Lean body mass Sarcopenia medicine.disease Endocrinology Ovarian function Fat mass Body water Body weight

Library of Congress Subject Headings: lcsh:Surgery lcsh:RD1-811

Subjects

Article Subject, Research Article

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