publication . Article . 2019

"Get the shot, now!" Disentangling content-related and social cues in physician-patient communication.

Benjamin Brummernhenrich; Regina Jucks;
Open Access English
  • Published: 01 Mar 2019
  • Country: Germany
Abstract
We investigated how recipients disentangle social and content-related cues in physicians’ communication. We presented 53 students with four different statements by physicians concerning the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine. In a 2 × 2 within-subject design, we manipulated politeness and the use of technical terms. We expected politeness variations to mainly affect social perceptions, whereas terminology should mainly affect perceptions of the content. However, politeness did not affect most judgments, whereas terminology influenced more social perceptions than expected. We argue that these variations differentially affect perceptions of fulfillment of basic communi...
Subjects
free text keywords: communication; learning; quantitative methods; social cognitions; technical language, Psychology, ddc:150, BF1-990, Report of Empirical Study, communication, learning, quantitative methods, social cognitions, technical language, Applied psychology, Patient communication, Social cue, Measles, medicine.disease, medicine
Related Organizations
77 references, page 1 of 6

Abele AE Wojciszke B (2007) Agency and communion from the perspective of self versus others. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 93(5): 751–763.17983298 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

Abele AE Wojciszke B (eds) (2019) Agency and Communion in Social Psychology. Current Issues in Social Psychology. Oxford: Routledge.

Aldaz BE Treharne GJ Knight RG et al (2017) Oncology healthcare professionals’ perspectives on the psychosocial support needs of cancer patients during oncology treatment. Journal of Health Psychology 22(10): 1332–1344.26837692 [PubMed]

Aronsson K Sätterlund-Larsson U (1987) Politeness strategies and doctor-patient communication: On the social choreography of collaborative thinking. Journal of Language and Social Psychology 6(1): 1–27.

Bates D Mächler M Bolker B et al (2015) Fitting linear mixed-effects models using lme4. Journal of Statistical Software 67(1): 1–48.

Blasi ZD Harkness E Ernst E et al (2001) Influence of context effects on health outcomes: A systematic review. The Lancet 357(9258): 757–762. [OpenAIRE]

Bonnefon J-F Feeney A De Neys W (2011) The risk of polite misunderstandings. Current Directions in Psychological Science 20(5): 321–324. [OpenAIRE]

Brennan SE Clark HH (1996) Conceptual pacts and lexical choice in conversation. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 22(6): 1482–1493.

Bromme R Brummernhenrich B Becker B-M et al (2012) The effects of politeness-related instruction on medical tutoring. Communication Education 61(4): 358–379. [OpenAIRE]

Bromme R Jucks R Runde A (2005) Barriers and biases in computer-mediated expert-layperson-communication. An overview and insights into the field of medical advice. In: Bromme R Hesse F Spada H (eds) Barriers, Biases and Opportunities of Communication and Cooperation with Computers and How They May Be Overcome. New York: Springer, pp. 89–118. [OpenAIRE]

Bromme R Jucks R Wagner T (2005) How to refer to “diabetes”? Language in onlin e health advice. Applied Cognitive Psychology 19(5): 569–586.

Bromme R Rambow R Nückles M (2001) Expertise and estimating what other people know: The influence of professional experience and type of knowledge. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 7(4): 317–330.11838894 [PubMed]

Brown P Levinson SC (1987) Politeness: Some Universals in Language Usage. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Brummernhenrich B Jucks R (2013) Managing face threats and instructions in online tutoring. Journal of Educational Psychology 105(2): 341–350. [OpenAIRE]

Brummernhenrich B Jucks R (2016) “He shouldn’t have put it that way!” How face threats and mitigation strategies affect person perception in online tutoring. Communication Education 65(3): 290–306.

77 references, page 1 of 6
Abstract
We investigated how recipients disentangle social and content-related cues in physicians’ communication. We presented 53 students with four different statements by physicians concerning the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine. In a 2 × 2 within-subject design, we manipulated politeness and the use of technical terms. We expected politeness variations to mainly affect social perceptions, whereas terminology should mainly affect perceptions of the content. However, politeness did not affect most judgments, whereas terminology influenced more social perceptions than expected. We argue that these variations differentially affect perceptions of fulfillment of basic communi...
Subjects
free text keywords: communication; learning; quantitative methods; social cognitions; technical language, Psychology, ddc:150, BF1-990, Report of Empirical Study, communication, learning, quantitative methods, social cognitions, technical language, Applied psychology, Patient communication, Social cue, Measles, medicine.disease, medicine
Related Organizations
77 references, page 1 of 6

Abele AE Wojciszke B (2007) Agency and communion from the perspective of self versus others. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 93(5): 751–763.17983298 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

Abele AE Wojciszke B (eds) (2019) Agency and Communion in Social Psychology. Current Issues in Social Psychology. Oxford: Routledge.

Aldaz BE Treharne GJ Knight RG et al (2017) Oncology healthcare professionals’ perspectives on the psychosocial support needs of cancer patients during oncology treatment. Journal of Health Psychology 22(10): 1332–1344.26837692 [PubMed]

Aronsson K Sätterlund-Larsson U (1987) Politeness strategies and doctor-patient communication: On the social choreography of collaborative thinking. Journal of Language and Social Psychology 6(1): 1–27.

Bates D Mächler M Bolker B et al (2015) Fitting linear mixed-effects models using lme4. Journal of Statistical Software 67(1): 1–48.

Blasi ZD Harkness E Ernst E et al (2001) Influence of context effects on health outcomes: A systematic review. The Lancet 357(9258): 757–762. [OpenAIRE]

Bonnefon J-F Feeney A De Neys W (2011) The risk of polite misunderstandings. Current Directions in Psychological Science 20(5): 321–324. [OpenAIRE]

Brennan SE Clark HH (1996) Conceptual pacts and lexical choice in conversation. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 22(6): 1482–1493.

Bromme R Brummernhenrich B Becker B-M et al (2012) The effects of politeness-related instruction on medical tutoring. Communication Education 61(4): 358–379. [OpenAIRE]

Bromme R Jucks R Runde A (2005) Barriers and biases in computer-mediated expert-layperson-communication. An overview and insights into the field of medical advice. In: Bromme R Hesse F Spada H (eds) Barriers, Biases and Opportunities of Communication and Cooperation with Computers and How They May Be Overcome. New York: Springer, pp. 89–118. [OpenAIRE]

Bromme R Jucks R Wagner T (2005) How to refer to “diabetes”? Language in onlin e health advice. Applied Cognitive Psychology 19(5): 569–586.

Bromme R Rambow R Nückles M (2001) Expertise and estimating what other people know: The influence of professional experience and type of knowledge. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 7(4): 317–330.11838894 [PubMed]

Brown P Levinson SC (1987) Politeness: Some Universals in Language Usage. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Brummernhenrich B Jucks R (2013) Managing face threats and instructions in online tutoring. Journal of Educational Psychology 105(2): 341–350. [OpenAIRE]

Brummernhenrich B Jucks R (2016) “He shouldn’t have put it that way!” How face threats and mitigation strategies affect person perception in online tutoring. Communication Education 65(3): 290–306.

77 references, page 1 of 6
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publication . Article . 2019

"Get the shot, now!" Disentangling content-related and social cues in physician-patient communication.

Benjamin Brummernhenrich; Regina Jucks;