Informal learning in SME majors for African American female undergraduates

Article English OPEN
Ezella McPherson (2014)
  • Publisher: Mercy College
  • Journal: Global Education Review (issn: 2325-663X)
  • Subject: Special aspects of education | STEM Education | Gender Studies | Qualitative Research | African American Women | LC8-6691
    acm: ComputingMilieux_GENERAL | ComputingMilieux_COMPUTERSANDEDUCATION

This research investigates how eight undergraduate African American women in science, math, and engineering (SME) majors accessed cultural capital and informal science learning opportunities from preschool to college. It uses the multiple case study methodological approach and cultural capital as the framework to better understand their opportunities to engage in free-choice science learning. The article demonstrates that African American women have access to cultural capital and informal science learning inside and outside of home and school environments in P-16 settings. In primary and secondary schools, African American girls acquire cultural capital and access to free-choice science learning in the home environment, museums, science fairs, student organizations and clubs. However, in high school African American female teenagers have fewer informal science learning opportunities like those such as those provided in primary school settings. In college, cultural capital is transmitted through informal science learning that consisted of involvement in student organizations, research projects, seminars, and conferences. These experiences contributed to their engagement and persistence in SME fields in K-16 settings. This research adds to cultural capital and informal science learning research by allowing scholars to better understand how African American women have opportunities to learn about the hidden curriculum of science through informal science settings throughout the educational pipeline.
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