publication . Article . Other literature type . 2018

Improving Communicative Competence through Synchronous Communication in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Environments: A Systematic Review

Huang, Xi;
Open Access
  • Published: 18 Jan 2018 Journal: Education Sciences, volume 8, page 15 (eissn: 2227-7102, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: MDPI AG
Abstract
Computer-supported collaborative learning facilitates the extension of second language acquisition into social practice. Studies on its achievement effects speak directly to the pedagogical notion of treating communicative practice in synchronous computer-mediated communication (SCMC): real-time communication that takes place between human beings via the instrumentality of computers in forms of text, audio and video communication, such as live chat and chatrooms as socially-oriented meaning construction. This review begins by considering the adoption of social interactionist views to identify key paradigms and supportive principles of computer-supported collabor...
Subjects
free text keywords: negotiated interactions, collective intelligence, interactional variables, quality of online learning experience, language socialization, communities of practices, Education, L, Social practice, Communicative competence, Computer-supported collaborative learning, Cooperative learning, Social interactionist theory, Linguistic competence, Psychology, Collaborative learning, Cognitive science, Second-language acquisition
Related Organizations
55 references, page 1 of 4

1. Belz, J. Social dimensions of telecollaborative language study. Lang. Learn. Technol. 2002, 6, 60-81.

2. O'Reilly, T. What is Web 2.0: Design patterns and business models for the next generation of software. Commun. Strateg. 2007, 65, 17-32.

3. Abraham, L. Computer-mediated glosses in second language reading comprehension and vocabulary learning: A meta-analysis. Comput. Assist. Lang. Learn. 2008, 21, 199-226. [CrossRef]

4. Abrams, Z.I. The effects of synchronous and asynchronous CMC on oral performance in German. Mod. Lang. J. 2003, 87, 157-167. [CrossRef]

5. AbuSeileek, A.F. The effect of computer assisted cooperative learning methods and group size on EFL learners' achievement in communicative skills. Comput. Educ. 2012, 58, 231-239. [CrossRef] [OpenAIRE]

6. AbuSeileek, A.F.; Qatawneh, K. Effects of synchronous and asynchronous computer-mediated communication (CMC) oral conversations on English language learners' discourse functions. Comput. Educ. 2013, 62, 181-190. [CrossRef]

7. Chun, D. Using computer networking to facilitate the acquisition of interactive competence. System 1994, 22, 17-31. [CrossRef]

8. Chun, D.M. Computer-mediated discourse in instructed environments. In Mediating Discourse Online; Magnan, S., Ed.; John Benjamins: Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2008; pp. 15-45.

9. Chun, D.M.; Payne, J.S. What makes students click: Working memory and look-up behavior. System 2004, 32, 481-503. [CrossRef]

10. Herring, S. Computer-Mediated Communication: Linguistic, Social and Cross-Cultural Perspectives; John Benjamins: Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 1996.

11. Littlewood, W. Communicative and task-based language teaching in East Asian classrooms. Lang. Teach. 2007, 40, 243-249. [CrossRef]

12. Bax, S. CALL: Past, present and future. System 2003, 31, 13-28. [CrossRef]

13. Van de Poel, K.; Swanepoel, P. Theoretical and methodological pluralism in designing effective lexical support for CALL. Comput. Assist. Lang. Learn. 2003, 16, 173-221. [CrossRef]

14. Ko, C.-J. Can synchronous computer-mediated communication (CMC) help beginning-level foreign language learners speak? Comput. Assist. Lang. Learn. 2012, 25, 217-236. [CrossRef]

15. Payne, J.S.; Whitney, P.J. Developing L2 oral proficiency through synchronous CMC Output, working memory, and interlanguage development. CALICO J. 2002, 20, 7-32.

55 references, page 1 of 4
Abstract
Computer-supported collaborative learning facilitates the extension of second language acquisition into social practice. Studies on its achievement effects speak directly to the pedagogical notion of treating communicative practice in synchronous computer-mediated communication (SCMC): real-time communication that takes place between human beings via the instrumentality of computers in forms of text, audio and video communication, such as live chat and chatrooms as socially-oriented meaning construction. This review begins by considering the adoption of social interactionist views to identify key paradigms and supportive principles of computer-supported collabor...
Subjects
free text keywords: negotiated interactions, collective intelligence, interactional variables, quality of online learning experience, language socialization, communities of practices, Education, L, Social practice, Communicative competence, Computer-supported collaborative learning, Cooperative learning, Social interactionist theory, Linguistic competence, Psychology, Collaborative learning, Cognitive science, Second-language acquisition
Related Organizations
55 references, page 1 of 4

1. Belz, J. Social dimensions of telecollaborative language study. Lang. Learn. Technol. 2002, 6, 60-81.

2. O'Reilly, T. What is Web 2.0: Design patterns and business models for the next generation of software. Commun. Strateg. 2007, 65, 17-32.

3. Abraham, L. Computer-mediated glosses in second language reading comprehension and vocabulary learning: A meta-analysis. Comput. Assist. Lang. Learn. 2008, 21, 199-226. [CrossRef]

4. Abrams, Z.I. The effects of synchronous and asynchronous CMC on oral performance in German. Mod. Lang. J. 2003, 87, 157-167. [CrossRef]

5. AbuSeileek, A.F. The effect of computer assisted cooperative learning methods and group size on EFL learners' achievement in communicative skills. Comput. Educ. 2012, 58, 231-239. [CrossRef] [OpenAIRE]

6. AbuSeileek, A.F.; Qatawneh, K. Effects of synchronous and asynchronous computer-mediated communication (CMC) oral conversations on English language learners' discourse functions. Comput. Educ. 2013, 62, 181-190. [CrossRef]

7. Chun, D. Using computer networking to facilitate the acquisition of interactive competence. System 1994, 22, 17-31. [CrossRef]

8. Chun, D.M. Computer-mediated discourse in instructed environments. In Mediating Discourse Online; Magnan, S., Ed.; John Benjamins: Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2008; pp. 15-45.

9. Chun, D.M.; Payne, J.S. What makes students click: Working memory and look-up behavior. System 2004, 32, 481-503. [CrossRef]

10. Herring, S. Computer-Mediated Communication: Linguistic, Social and Cross-Cultural Perspectives; John Benjamins: Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 1996.

11. Littlewood, W. Communicative and task-based language teaching in East Asian classrooms. Lang. Teach. 2007, 40, 243-249. [CrossRef]

12. Bax, S. CALL: Past, present and future. System 2003, 31, 13-28. [CrossRef]

13. Van de Poel, K.; Swanepoel, P. Theoretical and methodological pluralism in designing effective lexical support for CALL. Comput. Assist. Lang. Learn. 2003, 16, 173-221. [CrossRef]

14. Ko, C.-J. Can synchronous computer-mediated communication (CMC) help beginning-level foreign language learners speak? Comput. Assist. Lang. Learn. 2012, 25, 217-236. [CrossRef]

15. Payne, J.S.; Whitney, P.J. Developing L2 oral proficiency through synchronous CMC Output, working memory, and interlanguage development. CALICO J. 2002, 20, 7-32.

55 references, page 1 of 4
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