The impact of social media on the academic performance of second year medical students at College of Medicine, University of Babylon, Iraq

Article English OPEN
Ahmed Tawfeeq Alahmar (2016)
  • Publisher: Deccan College of Medical Sciences
  • Journal: Journal of Medical and Allied Sciences (issn: 2231-1696)
  • Related identifiers: doi: 10.5455/jmas.236927
  • Subject: R | medical students | Facebook | facebook messenger | Medicine | grades | social media
    acm: ComputingMilieux_COMPUTERSANDEDUCATION

Social media applications and their use among students have witnessed dramatic increase in the last decade and data on their effect on students academic performance are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of social media on the academic performance and grades of second year medical students at the College of Medicine, University of Babylon, Iraq. Second year medical students (n=57) completed online questionnaire about the type of social media they use frequently, time spent on these media in hours per day, the reasons for use of these media and the effect of social media on their grades. Students were also asked to provide the cumulative grades of physiology and anatomy courses. Time spent by students on social media and facebook messenger was correlated with combined grades of physiology and anatomy courses. All students have been using facebook and 96.5% have been using facebook messenger. Other popular applications were telegram, instagram and ask.fm. Average time spent on social media was 5.07+/- 2.93 and on facebook messenger was 1.80 +/-1.45 hours per day. Forty-two percent of students reported that social media have positive effect on their academic performance. No correlation has been found between time spent on social media or facebook messenger and students combined grades of physiology and anatomy. To conclude, social media and in particular facebook and facebook messenger are very popular among second year medical students. Time spent on social media seems to have no influence on second year medical students grades and academic performance. [J Med Allied Sci 2016; 6(2.000): 77-83]
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