publication . Article . 2013

Potential ‘Ecological Traps’ of Restored Landscapes: Koalas Phascolarctos cinereus Re-Occupy a Rehabilitated Mine Site

Romane H Cristescu; Peter B Banks; Frank N Carrick; Céline Frère;
Open Access English
  • Published: 01 Nov 2013 Journal: PLoS ONE, volume 8, issue 11 (issn: 1932-6203, eissn: 1932-6203, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: Public Library of Science
Abstract
With progressively increasing anthropogenic habitat disturbances, restoration of impacted landscapes is becoming a critical element of biodiversity conservation. Evaluation of success in restoration ecology rarely includes faunal components, usually only encompassing abiotic and floral components of the ecosystems. Even when fauna is explicitly included, it is usually only species presence/absence criteria that are considered. If restoration is to have a positive outcome, however, populations in restored habitats should exhibit comparable survival and reproductive rates to populations found in undisturbed surroundings. If a species recolonises restored areas but...
Subjects
free text keywords: Q, R, Research Article, Science, Medicine
102 references, page 1 of 7

1 MacMahon JA, Holl KD (2001) Ecological restoration, a key to conservation biology's future. In: Soulé ME, Orians GH, editors. Conservation Biology: Research priorities for the next decade. Washington, DC: Island Press. pp. 245–269.

2 Hobbs RJ (2004) Restoration ecology: The challenge of social values and expectations. Front Ecol Environ 2: 43–48.

3 Bennett AF (2000) Future directions in revegetation: Will biodiversity issues receive greater consideration? An Occasional Publication of the Australian Research Centre For Urban Ecology 2: 101–107.

4 SER (2004) The SER international primer on ecological restoration. Society for Ecological Restoration International (www.ser.org) & Tucson.

5 Dias PC (1996) Sources and sinks in population biology. Trends Ecol Evol 2: 326–330.

6 Pulliam R (1988) Sources, sinks, and population regulation. Am Nat 132: 652–661.

7 Robertson BA, Hutto RL (2006) A framework for understanding ecological traps and an evaluation of existing evidence. Ecology 87: 1075–1085.16761584 [PubMed]

8 Coaldrake JE (1979) Coastal sandmining and landscape rehabilitation in Eastern Australia. Landscape Planning, Special Issue Australian Landscapes: A Melting Pot of Aboriginal and European Influences 6: 359–374.

9 Grant C, Koch J (2007) Decommissioning Western Australia's first bauxite mine: Co-evolving vegetation restoration techniques and targets. Ecol Manage Restor 8: 92–105.

10 Ellis W (2003) Integration of natural resources management under Queensland mining legislation. Environ Plan Law J 20: 66–77.

11 Smyth CR, Dearden P (1998) Performance standards and monitoring requirements of surface coal mine reclamation success in mountainous jurisdictions of western North America: A review. J Environ Manage 53: 209–229.

12 Queensland Government (2006) Nature Conservation (Koala) Conservation Plan 2006 and Management Program 2006–2016. Queensland Government - Environmental Protection Agency. 1–140 p.

13 May SA, Norton TW (1996) Influence of fragmentation and disturbance on the potential impact of feral predators on native fauna in Australian f orest ecosystems. Wildl Res 23: 387–400.

14 Cristescu R, Ellis W, Villiers Dd, Lee K, Woosnam-Merchez O, et al (2011) North Stradbroke Island: An island ark for Queensland's koalas population? Proc R Soc Queensl 117: 309–334.

15 Melzer A (2011) Fox predation on koalas. Available: http://www.aph.gov.au/senate/committee/ec_ctte/koalas/submissions.htm. Accessed 2011 Oct 24.

102 references, page 1 of 7
Abstract
With progressively increasing anthropogenic habitat disturbances, restoration of impacted landscapes is becoming a critical element of biodiversity conservation. Evaluation of success in restoration ecology rarely includes faunal components, usually only encompassing abiotic and floral components of the ecosystems. Even when fauna is explicitly included, it is usually only species presence/absence criteria that are considered. If restoration is to have a positive outcome, however, populations in restored habitats should exhibit comparable survival and reproductive rates to populations found in undisturbed surroundings. If a species recolonises restored areas but...
Subjects
free text keywords: Q, R, Research Article, Science, Medicine
102 references, page 1 of 7

1 MacMahon JA, Holl KD (2001) Ecological restoration, a key to conservation biology's future. In: Soulé ME, Orians GH, editors. Conservation Biology: Research priorities for the next decade. Washington, DC: Island Press. pp. 245–269.

2 Hobbs RJ (2004) Restoration ecology: The challenge of social values and expectations. Front Ecol Environ 2: 43–48.

3 Bennett AF (2000) Future directions in revegetation: Will biodiversity issues receive greater consideration? An Occasional Publication of the Australian Research Centre For Urban Ecology 2: 101–107.

4 SER (2004) The SER international primer on ecological restoration. Society for Ecological Restoration International (www.ser.org) & Tucson.

5 Dias PC (1996) Sources and sinks in population biology. Trends Ecol Evol 2: 326–330.

6 Pulliam R (1988) Sources, sinks, and population regulation. Am Nat 132: 652–661.

7 Robertson BA, Hutto RL (2006) A framework for understanding ecological traps and an evaluation of existing evidence. Ecology 87: 1075–1085.16761584 [PubMed]

8 Coaldrake JE (1979) Coastal sandmining and landscape rehabilitation in Eastern Australia. Landscape Planning, Special Issue Australian Landscapes: A Melting Pot of Aboriginal and European Influences 6: 359–374.

9 Grant C, Koch J (2007) Decommissioning Western Australia's first bauxite mine: Co-evolving vegetation restoration techniques and targets. Ecol Manage Restor 8: 92–105.

10 Ellis W (2003) Integration of natural resources management under Queensland mining legislation. Environ Plan Law J 20: 66–77.

11 Smyth CR, Dearden P (1998) Performance standards and monitoring requirements of surface coal mine reclamation success in mountainous jurisdictions of western North America: A review. J Environ Manage 53: 209–229.

12 Queensland Government (2006) Nature Conservation (Koala) Conservation Plan 2006 and Management Program 2006–2016. Queensland Government - Environmental Protection Agency. 1–140 p.

13 May SA, Norton TW (1996) Influence of fragmentation and disturbance on the potential impact of feral predators on native fauna in Australian f orest ecosystems. Wildl Res 23: 387–400.

14 Cristescu R, Ellis W, Villiers Dd, Lee K, Woosnam-Merchez O, et al (2011) North Stradbroke Island: An island ark for Queensland's koalas population? Proc R Soc Queensl 117: 309–334.

15 Melzer A (2011) Fox predation on koalas. Available: http://www.aph.gov.au/senate/committee/ec_ctte/koalas/submissions.htm. Accessed 2011 Oct 24.

102 references, page 1 of 7
Powered by OpenAIRE Open Research Graph
Any information missing or wrong?Report an Issue
publication . Article . 2013

Potential ‘Ecological Traps’ of Restored Landscapes: Koalas Phascolarctos cinereus Re-Occupy a Rehabilitated Mine Site

Romane H Cristescu; Peter B Banks; Frank N Carrick; Céline Frère;