publication . Article . 2014

Learning to Pronounce First Words in Three Languages: An Investigation of Caregiver and Infant Behavior Using a Computational Model of an Infant

Ian S Howard; Piers Messum;
Open Access English
  • Published: 01 Oct 2014 Journal: PLoS ONE, volume 9, issue 10 (issn: 1932-6203, eissn: 1932-6203, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: Public Library of Science
Abstract
Words are made up of speech sounds. Almost all accounts of child speech development assume that children learn the pronunciation of first language (L1) speech sounds by imitation, most claiming that the child performs some kind of auditory matching to the elements of ambient speech. However, there is evidence to support an alternative account and we investigate the non-imitative child behavior and well-attested caregiver behavior that this account posits using Elija, a computational model of an infant. Through unsupervised active learning, Elija began by discovering motor patterns, which produced sounds. In separate interaction experiments, native speakers of En...
Subjects
mesheuropmc: otorhinolaryngologic diseases
free text keywords: Computational Biology, Linguistics, Research Article, Biology and Life Sciences, Languages, Anatomy, Signal Processing, Neuroscience, Medicine, Engineering and Technology, Computational Neuroscience, Motor System, Q, R, Nervous System, Learning and Memory, Speech, Social Sciences, Science, Speech Signal Processing, Behavioral Neuroscience, Cognitive Neuroscience, Natural Language
67 references, page 1 of 5

1 Studdert-Kennedy M (2002) Mirror neurons, vocal imitation and the evolution of particulate speech. In: Stamenov M, Gallese V, editors. Mirror neurons and the evolution of brain and language. John Benjamins. pp. 207–27.

2 Moskowitz AI (1970) The two-year-old stage in the acquisition of English phonology. Language 46: 426–441

3 Nehaniv CL, Dautenhahn K (2002) The correspondence problem. In:. Nehaniv CL, Dautenhahn K, editors. Imitation in Animals and Artifacts., Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. pp. 41–61.

4 McCune L, Vihman MM (1987) Vocal Motor Schemes. Papers and Reports in Child Language Development, Stanford University Department of Linguistics 26: 72–79

5 Fry DB (1968) The phonemic system in children's speech. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders 3(1): 13–19

6 Kuhl PK (2000) A new view of language acquisition. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 97: 11850–11857

7 Vihman MM (1993) Variable paths to early word production. Journal of Phonetics 21: 61–82

8 Messum PR (2007) The Role of Imitation in Learning to Pronounce. Ph.D. Thesis, University of London. Available: https://sites.google.com/site/pmessum/downloads/ Accessed 25 September 2014.

9 MacDonald EN, Johnson EK, Forsythe J, Plante P, Munhall KG (2011) Children's development of self-regulation in speech production. Current Biology 22(2): 113–117 22197241 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

10 Lametti DR, Nasir SM, Ostry DJ (2012) Sensory preference in speech production revealed by simultaneous alteration of auditory and somatosensory feedback. Journal of Neuroscience 32: 9351–9358 22764242 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

11 Messum P, Howard IS (2012) Speech Development: Toddlers Don't Mind Getting It Wrong. Current Biology 22(5): R160–R161 22401896 [PubMed]

12 Locke JL (1979) The child's processing of phonology. In: Child Language and Communication: Minnesota Symposium on Child Psychology Volume 12. Collins WA, editor. Hillsdale, NJ: LEA. pp. 83–119.

13 Alvater-Mackensen N, Fikkert P (2010) The acquisition of the stop-fricative contrast in perception and production. Lingua 120: 1898–1909 [OpenAIRE]

14 Rasanen O (2012) Computational modeling of phonetic and lexical learning in early language acquisition: existing models and future directions. Speech Communication 54(9): 975–997

15 Markey KL (1994) The sensorimotor foundations of phonology: a computational model of early childhood articulatory and phonetic development. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Colorado.

67 references, page 1 of 5
Abstract
Words are made up of speech sounds. Almost all accounts of child speech development assume that children learn the pronunciation of first language (L1) speech sounds by imitation, most claiming that the child performs some kind of auditory matching to the elements of ambient speech. However, there is evidence to support an alternative account and we investigate the non-imitative child behavior and well-attested caregiver behavior that this account posits using Elija, a computational model of an infant. Through unsupervised active learning, Elija began by discovering motor patterns, which produced sounds. In separate interaction experiments, native speakers of En...
Subjects
mesheuropmc: otorhinolaryngologic diseases
free text keywords: Computational Biology, Linguistics, Research Article, Biology and Life Sciences, Languages, Anatomy, Signal Processing, Neuroscience, Medicine, Engineering and Technology, Computational Neuroscience, Motor System, Q, R, Nervous System, Learning and Memory, Speech, Social Sciences, Science, Speech Signal Processing, Behavioral Neuroscience, Cognitive Neuroscience, Natural Language
67 references, page 1 of 5

1 Studdert-Kennedy M (2002) Mirror neurons, vocal imitation and the evolution of particulate speech. In: Stamenov M, Gallese V, editors. Mirror neurons and the evolution of brain and language. John Benjamins. pp. 207–27.

2 Moskowitz AI (1970) The two-year-old stage in the acquisition of English phonology. Language 46: 426–441

3 Nehaniv CL, Dautenhahn K (2002) The correspondence problem. In:. Nehaniv CL, Dautenhahn K, editors. Imitation in Animals and Artifacts., Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. pp. 41–61.

4 McCune L, Vihman MM (1987) Vocal Motor Schemes. Papers and Reports in Child Language Development, Stanford University Department of Linguistics 26: 72–79

5 Fry DB (1968) The phonemic system in children's speech. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders 3(1): 13–19

6 Kuhl PK (2000) A new view of language acquisition. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 97: 11850–11857

7 Vihman MM (1993) Variable paths to early word production. Journal of Phonetics 21: 61–82

8 Messum PR (2007) The Role of Imitation in Learning to Pronounce. Ph.D. Thesis, University of London. Available: https://sites.google.com/site/pmessum/downloads/ Accessed 25 September 2014.

9 MacDonald EN, Johnson EK, Forsythe J, Plante P, Munhall KG (2011) Children's development of self-regulation in speech production. Current Biology 22(2): 113–117 22197241 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

10 Lametti DR, Nasir SM, Ostry DJ (2012) Sensory preference in speech production revealed by simultaneous alteration of auditory and somatosensory feedback. Journal of Neuroscience 32: 9351–9358 22764242 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

11 Messum P, Howard IS (2012) Speech Development: Toddlers Don't Mind Getting It Wrong. Current Biology 22(5): R160–R161 22401896 [PubMed]

12 Locke JL (1979) The child's processing of phonology. In: Child Language and Communication: Minnesota Symposium on Child Psychology Volume 12. Collins WA, editor. Hillsdale, NJ: LEA. pp. 83–119.

13 Alvater-Mackensen N, Fikkert P (2010) The acquisition of the stop-fricative contrast in perception and production. Lingua 120: 1898–1909 [OpenAIRE]

14 Rasanen O (2012) Computational modeling of phonetic and lexical learning in early language acquisition: existing models and future directions. Speech Communication 54(9): 975–997

15 Markey KL (1994) The sensorimotor foundations of phonology: a computational model of early childhood articulatory and phonetic development. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Colorado.

67 references, page 1 of 5
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publication . Article . 2014

Learning to Pronounce First Words in Three Languages: An Investigation of Caregiver and Infant Behavior Using a Computational Model of an Infant

Ian S Howard; Piers Messum;