publication . Article . Other literature type . 2019

Contrasting Computational Models of Mate Preference Integration Across 45 Countries

Pavol Prokop; Pavol Prokop; Ivan Sarmány-Schuller; Ruta Sargautyte; Daria Dronova; Konstantinos Kafetsios; Christin Melanie Vauclair; Franco Simonetti; Miriam Parise; Piotr Sorokowski; ...
Open Access English
  • Published: 15 Nov 2019 Journal: Scientific Reports (issn: 2045-2322, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Abstract
Humans express a wide array of ideal mate preferences. Around the world, people desire romantic partners who are intelligent, healthy, kind, physically attractive, wealthy, and more. In order for these ideal preferences to guide the choice of actual romantic partners, human mating psychology must possess a means to integrate information across these many preference dimensions into summaries of the overall mate value of their potential mates. Here we explore the computational design of this mate preference integration process using a large sample of n = 14,487 people from 45 countries around the world. We combine this large cross-cultural sample with agent-based ...
Subjects
free text keywords: Medicine, R, Science, Q, Article, Human behaviour, Sexual selection, Multidisciplinary, General, mate preference ; computational models ; partners ; Euclidean model, Mate choice, Large sample, Computational model, Psychology, Human mating strategies, Mate value, Computational design, Social psychology, Romantic partners
38 references, page 1 of 3

Antonovics, K, Town, R. Are all the good men married? Uncovering the sources of the marital wage premium. The American Economic Review. 2004; 94: 317-321 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Braithwaite, S, Holt-Lunstad, J. Romantic relationships and mental health. Current Opinion in Psychology. 2017; 13: 120-125 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Holt-Lunstad, J, Smith, TB, Layton, JB. Social relationships and mortality risk: A meta-analytic review. PLOS Medicine. 2010; 7: e1000316 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

4.Robles, T. F., Slatcher, R. B., Trombello, J. M. & McGinn, M. M. Marital quality and health: A meta-analytic review. Psychological Bulletin 140 (2014).

Buss, DM. Sex differences in human mate preferences: Evolutionary hypotheses tested in 37 cultures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences. 1989; 12: 1-14 [DOI]

Marlowe, FW. Mate preferences among Hadza hunter-gatherers. Human Nature. 2004; 15: 365-376 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Fletcher, GJ, Simpson, JA, Thomas, G, Giles, L. Ideals in intimate relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 1999; 76: 72 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Eastwick, PW, Luchies, LB, Finkel, EJ, Hunt, LL. The predictive validity of ideal partner preferences: A review and meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin. 2014; 140: 623-665 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Li, NP, Bailey, JM, Kenrick, DT, Linsenmeier, JA. The necessities and luxuries of mate preferences: Testing the tradeoffs. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2002; 82: 947-955 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Miller, GF, Todd, PM. Mate choice turns cognitive. Trends in Cognitive Sciences. 1998; 2: 190-198 [PubMed] [DOI]

Simão, J, Todd, PM. Emergent patterns of mate choice in human populations. Artificial Life. 2003; 9: 403-417 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Conroy-Beam, Daniel. Euclidean Mate Value and Power of Choice on the Mating Market. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. 2017; 44 (2): 252-264 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

13.Conroy-Beam, D. & Buss, D. M. Euclidean distances discriminatively predict short-te rm and long-term attraction to potential mates. Evolution and Human Behavior 0, (2017).

Buss, DM, Barnes, M. Preferences in human mate selection. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 1986; 50: 559-570 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Buss, DM, Shackelford, TK. Attractive women want it all: Good genes, economic investment, parenting proclivities, and emotional commitment.. Evolutionary Psychology. 2008; 6: 134-146 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

38 references, page 1 of 3
Abstract
Humans express a wide array of ideal mate preferences. Around the world, people desire romantic partners who are intelligent, healthy, kind, physically attractive, wealthy, and more. In order for these ideal preferences to guide the choice of actual romantic partners, human mating psychology must possess a means to integrate information across these many preference dimensions into summaries of the overall mate value of their potential mates. Here we explore the computational design of this mate preference integration process using a large sample of n = 14,487 people from 45 countries around the world. We combine this large cross-cultural sample with agent-based ...
Subjects
free text keywords: Medicine, R, Science, Q, Article, Human behaviour, Sexual selection, Multidisciplinary, General, mate preference ; computational models ; partners ; Euclidean model, Mate choice, Large sample, Computational model, Psychology, Human mating strategies, Mate value, Computational design, Social psychology, Romantic partners
38 references, page 1 of 3

Antonovics, K, Town, R. Are all the good men married? Uncovering the sources of the marital wage premium. The American Economic Review. 2004; 94: 317-321 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Braithwaite, S, Holt-Lunstad, J. Romantic relationships and mental health. Current Opinion in Psychology. 2017; 13: 120-125 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Holt-Lunstad, J, Smith, TB, Layton, JB. Social relationships and mortality risk: A meta-analytic review. PLOS Medicine. 2010; 7: e1000316 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

4.Robles, T. F., Slatcher, R. B., Trombello, J. M. & McGinn, M. M. Marital quality and health: A meta-analytic review. Psychological Bulletin 140 (2014).

Buss, DM. Sex differences in human mate preferences: Evolutionary hypotheses tested in 37 cultures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences. 1989; 12: 1-14 [DOI]

Marlowe, FW. Mate preferences among Hadza hunter-gatherers. Human Nature. 2004; 15: 365-376 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Fletcher, GJ, Simpson, JA, Thomas, G, Giles, L. Ideals in intimate relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 1999; 76: 72 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Eastwick, PW, Luchies, LB, Finkel, EJ, Hunt, LL. The predictive validity of ideal partner preferences: A review and meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin. 2014; 140: 623-665 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Li, NP, Bailey, JM, Kenrick, DT, Linsenmeier, JA. The necessities and luxuries of mate preferences: Testing the tradeoffs. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2002; 82: 947-955 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Miller, GF, Todd, PM. Mate choice turns cognitive. Trends in Cognitive Sciences. 1998; 2: 190-198 [PubMed] [DOI]

Simão, J, Todd, PM. Emergent patterns of mate choice in human populations. Artificial Life. 2003; 9: 403-417 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Conroy-Beam, Daniel. Euclidean Mate Value and Power of Choice on the Mating Market. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. 2017; 44 (2): 252-264 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

13.Conroy-Beam, D. & Buss, D. M. Euclidean distances discriminatively predict short-te rm and long-term attraction to potential mates. Evolution and Human Behavior 0, (2017).

Buss, DM, Barnes, M. Preferences in human mate selection. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 1986; 50: 559-570 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Buss, DM, Shackelford, TK. Attractive women want it all: Good genes, economic investment, parenting proclivities, and emotional commitment.. Evolutionary Psychology. 2008; 6: 134-146 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

38 references, page 1 of 3
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