publication . Article . 2017

Implementing electronic data capture at a well-established health and demographic surveillance site in rural northern Malawi.

McLean, Estelle; Dube, Albert; Saul, Jacky; Branson, Keith; Luhanga, Mabvuto; Mwiba, Oddie; Kalobekamo, Fredrick; Geis, Steffen; Crampin, Amelia C;
Open Access English
  • Published: 01 Sep 2017 Journal: Global Health Action, volume 10, issue 1 (issn: 1654-9716, eissn: 1654-9880, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis Open
Abstract
ABSTRACT This article aims to assess multiple issues of resources, staffing, local opinion, data quality, cost, and security while transitioning to electronic data collection (EDC) at a long-running community research site in northern Malawi. Levels of missing and error fields, delay from data collection to availability, and average number of interviews per day were compared between EDC and paper in a complex, repeated annual household survey. Three focus groups with field and data staff with experience using both methods, and in-depth interviews with participants were carried out. Cost for each method were estimated and compared. Missing data was more common on...
Subjects
free text keywords: Electronic data capture, Health and Demographic Surveillance Site, data quality, Review Article, Malawi, RA1-1270, Public aspects of medicine, Methods Forum Article
Funded by
WT
Project
  • Funder: Wellcome Trust (WT)
23 references, page 1 of 2

[1] Ali M, Deen JL, Khatib A, et al. Paperless registration during survey enumerations and large oral cholera mass vaccination in Zanzibar, the United Republic of Tanzania. Bull World Health Organ. 2010;88:556-559. [OpenAIRE]

[2] Onono MA, Carraher N, Cohen RC, et al. Use of personal digital assistants for data collection in a multi-site AIDS stigma study in rural south Nyanza, Kenya. Afr Health Sci. 2011;11:464-473.

[3] Walther B, Hossin S, Townend J, et al. Comparison of electronic data capture (EDC) with the standard data capture method for clinical trial data. PLoS One. 2011;6:e25348. [OpenAIRE]

[4] Knipe DW, Pearson M, Borgstrøm R, et al. Challenges and opportunities of a paperless baseline survey in Sri Lanka. BMC Res Notes. 2014;7:452. [OpenAIRE]

[5] Byass P, Hounton S, Ouédraogo M, et al. Direct data capture using hand-held computers in rural Burkina Faso: experiences, benefits and lessons learnt. Trop Med Int Health. 2008;13:25-30.

[6] Njuguna HN, Caselton DL, Arunga GO, et al. A comparison of smartphones to paper-based questionnaires for routine influenza sentinel surveillance, Kenya, 2011-2012. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2014;14:107.

[7] Thriemer K, Ley B, Ame SM, et al. Replacing paper data collection forms with electronic data entry in the field: findings from a study of community-acquired bloodstream infections in Pemba, Zanzibar. BMC Res Notes. 2012;5:113. [OpenAIRE]

[8] King C, Hall J, Banda M, et al. Electronic data capture in a rural African setting: evaluating experiences with different systems in Malawi. Glob Health Action. 2014;7:25878.

[9] Lane SJ, Heddle NM, Arnold E, et al. A review of randomized controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of hand held computers with paper methods for data collection. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2006;6:23. [OpenAIRE]

[10] Giduthuri JG, Maire N, Joseph S, et al. Developing and validating a tablet version of an illness explanatory model interview for a public health survey in Pune, India. PLoS One. 2014;9:e107374.

[11] Zhang S, Wu Q, Van Velthoven MH, et al. Smartphone versus pen-and-paper data collection of infant feeding practices in rural China. J Med Internet Res. 2012;14:e119.

[12] Wan X, Raymond HF, Wen T, et al. Acceptability and adoption of handheld computer data collection for public health research in China: a case study. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2013;13:68.

[13] Le Jeannic A, Quelen C, Alberti C, et al. Comparison of two data collection processes in clinical studies: electronic and paper case report forms. BMC Med Res Methodol. 2014;14:7.

[14] Cheng KG, Ernesto F, Ovalle-Bahamón RE, et al. Barriers to acceptance of personal digital assistants for HIV/AIDS data collection in Angola. Int J Med Inform. 2011;80:579-585.

[15] King JD, Buolamwini J, Cromwell EA, et al. A novel electronic data collection system for large-scale surveys of neglected tropical diseases. PLoS One. 2013;8: e74570. [OpenAIRE]

23 references, page 1 of 2
Abstract
ABSTRACT This article aims to assess multiple issues of resources, staffing, local opinion, data quality, cost, and security while transitioning to electronic data collection (EDC) at a long-running community research site in northern Malawi. Levels of missing and error fields, delay from data collection to availability, and average number of interviews per day were compared between EDC and paper in a complex, repeated annual household survey. Three focus groups with field and data staff with experience using both methods, and in-depth interviews with participants were carried out. Cost for each method were estimated and compared. Missing data was more common on...
Subjects
free text keywords: Electronic data capture, Health and Demographic Surveillance Site, data quality, Review Article, Malawi, RA1-1270, Public aspects of medicine, Methods Forum Article
Funded by
WT
Project
  • Funder: Wellcome Trust (WT)
23 references, page 1 of 2

[1] Ali M, Deen JL, Khatib A, et al. Paperless registration during survey enumerations and large oral cholera mass vaccination in Zanzibar, the United Republic of Tanzania. Bull World Health Organ. 2010;88:556-559. [OpenAIRE]

[2] Onono MA, Carraher N, Cohen RC, et al. Use of personal digital assistants for data collection in a multi-site AIDS stigma study in rural south Nyanza, Kenya. Afr Health Sci. 2011;11:464-473.

[3] Walther B, Hossin S, Townend J, et al. Comparison of electronic data capture (EDC) with the standard data capture method for clinical trial data. PLoS One. 2011;6:e25348. [OpenAIRE]

[4] Knipe DW, Pearson M, Borgstrøm R, et al. Challenges and opportunities of a paperless baseline survey in Sri Lanka. BMC Res Notes. 2014;7:452. [OpenAIRE]

[5] Byass P, Hounton S, Ouédraogo M, et al. Direct data capture using hand-held computers in rural Burkina Faso: experiences, benefits and lessons learnt. Trop Med Int Health. 2008;13:25-30.

[6] Njuguna HN, Caselton DL, Arunga GO, et al. A comparison of smartphones to paper-based questionnaires for routine influenza sentinel surveillance, Kenya, 2011-2012. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2014;14:107.

[7] Thriemer K, Ley B, Ame SM, et al. Replacing paper data collection forms with electronic data entry in the field: findings from a study of community-acquired bloodstream infections in Pemba, Zanzibar. BMC Res Notes. 2012;5:113. [OpenAIRE]

[8] King C, Hall J, Banda M, et al. Electronic data capture in a rural African setting: evaluating experiences with different systems in Malawi. Glob Health Action. 2014;7:25878.

[9] Lane SJ, Heddle NM, Arnold E, et al. A review of randomized controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of hand held computers with paper methods for data collection. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2006;6:23. [OpenAIRE]

[10] Giduthuri JG, Maire N, Joseph S, et al. Developing and validating a tablet version of an illness explanatory model interview for a public health survey in Pune, India. PLoS One. 2014;9:e107374.

[11] Zhang S, Wu Q, Van Velthoven MH, et al. Smartphone versus pen-and-paper data collection of infant feeding practices in rural China. J Med Internet Res. 2012;14:e119.

[12] Wan X, Raymond HF, Wen T, et al. Acceptability and adoption of handheld computer data collection for public health research in China: a case study. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2013;13:68.

[13] Le Jeannic A, Quelen C, Alberti C, et al. Comparison of two data collection processes in clinical studies: electronic and paper case report forms. BMC Med Res Methodol. 2014;14:7.

[14] Cheng KG, Ernesto F, Ovalle-Bahamón RE, et al. Barriers to acceptance of personal digital assistants for HIV/AIDS data collection in Angola. Int J Med Inform. 2011;80:579-585.

[15] King JD, Buolamwini J, Cromwell EA, et al. A novel electronic data collection system for large-scale surveys of neglected tropical diseases. PLoS One. 2013;8: e74570. [OpenAIRE]

23 references, page 1 of 2
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publication . Article . 2017

Implementing electronic data capture at a well-established health and demographic surveillance site in rural northern Malawi.

McLean, Estelle; Dube, Albert; Saul, Jacky; Branson, Keith; Luhanga, Mabvuto; Mwiba, Oddie; Kalobekamo, Fredrick; Geis, Steffen; Crampin, Amelia C;