Increase in salivary oxytocin and decrease in salivary cortisol after listening to relaxing slow-tempo and exciting fast-tempo music

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Ooishi, Yuuki; Mukai, Hideo; Watanabe, Ken; Kawato, Suguru; Kashino, Makio;
(2017)
  • Publisher: Public Library of Science
  • Journal: PLoS ONE,volume 12,issue 12 (issn: 1932-6203, eissn: 1932-6203)
  • Publisher copyright policies & self-archiving
  • Related identifiers: pmc: PMC5718605, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0189075
  • Subject: Music Cognition | Research Article | Cognitive Psychology | Hormones | Anatomy | Immunoassays | Neurochemistry | Physical Sciences | Psychology | Physics | Acoustics | Enzyme-Linked Immunoassays | Steroid Hormones | Lipid Hormones | Oxytocin | Biology and Life Sciences | Emotions | Neuroscience | Bioacoustics | Research and Analysis Methods | Physiology | Medicine | Body Fluids | Immunologic Techniques | Saliva | Q | Cortisol | R | Peptide Hormones | Relaxation (Psychology) | Social Sciences | Science | Biochemistry | Medicine and Health Sciences | Neurochemicals | Cognitive Science
    mesheuropmc: endocrine system | hormones, hormone substitutes, and hormone antagonists | humanities | behavioral disciplines and activities

Relaxation and excitation are components of the effects of music listening. The tempo of music is often considered a critical factor when determining these effects: listening to slow-tempo and fast-tempo music elicits relaxation and excitation, respectively. However, th... View more
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