Biodegradable Polymers

Article, Part of book or chapter of book English OPEN
Vroman, Isabelle ; Tighzert, Lan (2009)
  • Publisher: Molecular Diversity Preservation International
  • Journal: Materials, volume 2, issue 2, pages 307-344 (issn: 1996-1944, eissn: 1996-1944)
  • Related identifiers: doi: 10.3390/ma2020307, pmc: PMC5445709
  • Subject: QC120-168.85 | Biodegradable polymers | biodegradable polymer blends | Engineering (General). Civil engineering (General) | Technology | polyurethanes | polyesters | TA1-2040 | polyamides | T | Review | Electrical engineering. Electronics. Nuclear engineering | TK1-9971 | Microscopy | biopolymers | QH201-278.5 | Descriptive and experimental mechanics

Biodegradable materials are used in packaging, agriculture, medicine and other areas. In recent years there has been an increase in interest in biodegradable polymers. Two classes of biodegradable polymers can be distinguished: synthetic or natural polymers. There are polymers produced from feedstocks derived either from petroleum resources (non renewable resources) or from biological resources (renewable resources). In general natural polymers offer fewer advantages than synthetic polymers. The following review presents an overview of the different biodegradable polymers that are currently being used and their properties, as well as new developments in their synthesis and applications.
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