publication . Article . Other literature type . 2016

A Bidirectional Relationship between Executive Function and Health Behavior: Evidence, Implications, and Future Directions.

Michael Daly;
Open Access English
  • Published: 23 Aug 2016 Journal: Frontiers in Neuroscience (issn: 1662-453X, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
Abstract
Physically active lifestyles and other health-enhancing behaviors play an important role in preserving executive function into old age. Conversely, emerging research suggests that executive functions facilitate participation in a broad range of healthy behaviors including physical activity and reduced fatty food, tobacco, and alcohol consumption. They do this by supporting the volition, planning, performance monitoring, and inhibition necessary to enact intentions and override urges to engage in health damaging behavior. Here, we focus firstly on evidence suggesting that health-enhancing behaviors can induce improvements in executive function. We then switch our...
Subjects
free text keywords: Neuroscience, Focused Review, cognitive ability, Diet, Executive Function, Health, Health Behavior, physical activity, substance use, Neurosciences. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry, RC321-571, Psychology, Cognition, Interdependence, media_common.quotation_subject, media_common, Health risk, Performance monitoring, Disease, Executive functions, Developmental psychology
Related Organizations
150 references, page 1 of 10

Albinet C. T. Boucard G. Bouquet C. A. Audiffren M. (2012). Processing speed and executive functions in cognitive aging: how to disentangle their mutual relationship? Brain Cogn. 79, 1–11. 10.1016/j.bandc.2012.02.001 22387275 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Allan J. L. Johnston M. Campbell N. C. (2010). Unintentional eating: what determines goal-incongruent chocolate consumption? Appetite 54, 422–425. 10.1016/j.appet.2010.01.009 20100530 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Allan J. L. Johnston M. Campbell N. C. (2011). Missed by and inch or a mile? Predicting size of intention-behaviour gap from measures of executive control. Psychol. Health 26, 635–650. 10.1080/08870441003681307 21360414 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Allom V. Mullan B. Hagger M. (2016). Does inhibitory control training improve health behaviour? A meta-analysis. Health Psychol. Rev. 10, 168–186. 10.1080/17437199.2015.1051078 26058688 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Almeida O. P. Garrido G. J. Alfonson H. Hulse G. Lautenschlager N. T. Hankey G. J. . (2011). 24-month effect of smoking cessation on cognitive function and brain structure in later life. NeuroImage 15, 1480–1489. 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.01.063 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Anderson P. (2002). Assessment and development of executive function (EF) during childhood. Child Neuropsychol. 8, 71–82. 10.1076/chin.8.2.71.8724 12638061 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Anguera J. A. Boccanfuso J. Rintoul J. L. Al-Hashimi O. Faraji F. Janowich J. . (2013). Video game training enhances cognitive control in older adults. Nature 501, 97–101. 10.1038/nature12486 24005416 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Arendt J. N. (2005). Does education cause better health? A panel data analysis using school reforms for identification. Econ. Educ. Rev. 24, 149–160. 10.1016/j.econedurev.2004.04.008 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Astrup A. Grunwald G. K. Melanson E. L. Saris W. H. Hill J. O. (2000). The role of low-fat diets in body weight control: a meta-analysis of ad libitum dietary intervention studies. Int. J. Obes. 24, 1545–1552. 10.1038/sj.ijo.0801453 11126204 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Baldacchino A. Balfour D. J. Matthews K. (2015). Impulsivity and opioid drugs: differential effects of heroin, methadone and prescribed analgesic medication. Psychol. Med. 45, 1167–1179. 10.1017/S0033291714002189 25171718 [PubMed] [DOI]

Ball K. Berch D. B. Helmers K. F. Jobe J. B. Leveck M. D. Marsiske M. . (2002). Effects of cognitive training interventions with older adults: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA 288, 2271–2281. 10.1001/jama.288.18.2271 12425704 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Banks J. Mazzonna F. (2012). The effect of education on old age cognitive abilities: evidence from a regression discontinuity design. Econ. J. 122, 41 8–448. 10.1111/j.1468-0297.2012.02499.x 22611283 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Baydyuk M. Xu B. (2014). BDNF signaling and survival of striatal neurons. Front. Cell. Neurosci. 8:254. 10.3389/fncel.2014.00254 25221473 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Berkman E. T. Falk E. B. Lieberman M. D. (2011). In the trenches of real-world self-control: neural correlates of breaking the link between craving and smoking. Psychol. Sci. 22, 498–506. 10.1177/0956797611400918 21378368 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Best J. R. Nagamatsu L. S. Liu-Ambrose T. (2014). Improvements to executive function during exercise training predict maintenance of physical activity over the following year. Front. Hum. Neurosci. 8:353. 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00353 24904387 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

150 references, page 1 of 10
Related research
Abstract
Physically active lifestyles and other health-enhancing behaviors play an important role in preserving executive function into old age. Conversely, emerging research suggests that executive functions facilitate participation in a broad range of healthy behaviors including physical activity and reduced fatty food, tobacco, and alcohol consumption. They do this by supporting the volition, planning, performance monitoring, and inhibition necessary to enact intentions and override urges to engage in health damaging behavior. Here, we focus firstly on evidence suggesting that health-enhancing behaviors can induce improvements in executive function. We then switch our...
Subjects
free text keywords: Neuroscience, Focused Review, cognitive ability, Diet, Executive Function, Health, Health Behavior, physical activity, substance use, Neurosciences. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry, RC321-571, Psychology, Cognition, Interdependence, media_common.quotation_subject, media_common, Health risk, Performance monitoring, Disease, Executive functions, Developmental psychology
Related Organizations
150 references, page 1 of 10

Albinet C. T. Boucard G. Bouquet C. A. Audiffren M. (2012). Processing speed and executive functions in cognitive aging: how to disentangle their mutual relationship? Brain Cogn. 79, 1–11. 10.1016/j.bandc.2012.02.001 22387275 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Allan J. L. Johnston M. Campbell N. C. (2010). Unintentional eating: what determines goal-incongruent chocolate consumption? Appetite 54, 422–425. 10.1016/j.appet.2010.01.009 20100530 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Allan J. L. Johnston M. Campbell N. C. (2011). Missed by and inch or a mile? Predicting size of intention-behaviour gap from measures of executive control. Psychol. Health 26, 635–650. 10.1080/08870441003681307 21360414 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Allom V. Mullan B. Hagger M. (2016). Does inhibitory control training improve health behaviour? A meta-analysis. Health Psychol. Rev. 10, 168–186. 10.1080/17437199.2015.1051078 26058688 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Almeida O. P. Garrido G. J. Alfonson H. Hulse G. Lautenschlager N. T. Hankey G. J. . (2011). 24-month effect of smoking cessation on cognitive function and brain structure in later life. NeuroImage 15, 1480–1489. 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.01.063 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Anderson P. (2002). Assessment and development of executive function (EF) during childhood. Child Neuropsychol. 8, 71–82. 10.1076/chin.8.2.71.8724 12638061 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Anguera J. A. Boccanfuso J. Rintoul J. L. Al-Hashimi O. Faraji F. Janowich J. . (2013). Video game training enhances cognitive control in older adults. Nature 501, 97–101. 10.1038/nature12486 24005416 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Arendt J. N. (2005). Does education cause better health? A panel data analysis using school reforms for identification. Econ. Educ. Rev. 24, 149–160. 10.1016/j.econedurev.2004.04.008 [OpenAIRE] [DOI]

Astrup A. Grunwald G. K. Melanson E. L. Saris W. H. Hill J. O. (2000). The role of low-fat diets in body weight control: a meta-analysis of ad libitum dietary intervention studies. Int. J. Obes. 24, 1545–1552. 10.1038/sj.ijo.0801453 11126204 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Baldacchino A. Balfour D. J. Matthews K. (2015). Impulsivity and opioid drugs: differential effects of heroin, methadone and prescribed analgesic medication. Psychol. Med. 45, 1167–1179. 10.1017/S0033291714002189 25171718 [PubMed] [DOI]

Ball K. Berch D. B. Helmers K. F. Jobe J. B. Leveck M. D. Marsiske M. . (2002). Effects of cognitive training interventions with older adults: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA 288, 2271–2281. 10.1001/jama.288.18.2271 12425704 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Banks J. Mazzonna F. (2012). The effect of education on old age cognitive abilities: evidence from a regression discontinuity design. Econ. J. 122, 41 8–448. 10.1111/j.1468-0297.2012.02499.x 22611283 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Baydyuk M. Xu B. (2014). BDNF signaling and survival of striatal neurons. Front. Cell. Neurosci. 8:254. 10.3389/fncel.2014.00254 25221473 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Berkman E. T. Falk E. B. Lieberman M. D. (2011). In the trenches of real-world self-control: neural correlates of breaking the link between craving and smoking. Psychol. Sci. 22, 498–506. 10.1177/0956797611400918 21378368 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

Best J. R. Nagamatsu L. S. Liu-Ambrose T. (2014). Improvements to executive function during exercise training predict maintenance of physical activity over the following year. Front. Hum. Neurosci. 8:353. 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00353 24904387 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed] [DOI]

150 references, page 1 of 10
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