publication . Other literature type . Article . Preprint . Research . 2018

Evidence for color dichotomy in the primordial Neptunian Trojan population

Hsing-Wen Lin; S. Avila; G. Tarle; Larissa Markwardt; P. Doel; V. Scarpine; K. Honscheid; Jennifer L. Marshall; M. Carrasco Kind; F. Sobreira; ...
Open Access
  • Published: 01 Jun 2018
  • Publisher: Elsevier BV
  • Country: United Kingdom
Abstract
<p>In the current model of early Solar System evolution, the stable members of the Jovian and Neptunian Trojan populations were captured into resonance from the leftover reservoir of planetesimals during the outward migration of the giant planets. As a result, both Jovian and Neptunian Trojans share a common origin with the primordial disk population, whose other surviving members constitute today's trans-Neptunian object (TNO) populations. The cold (low inclination and small eccentricity) classical TNOs are ultra-red, while the dynamically excited “hot” (high inclination and larger eccentricity) population of TNOs contains a mixture of ultra-red and blue object...
Subjects
free text keywords: Space and Planetary Science, Astronomy and Astrophysics, Astrophysics - Earth and Planetary Astrophysics, Trojan asteroids, Trans-Neptunian objects, Resonances, Orbital, Orbital, Resonances, Trans-Neptunian objects, Trojan asteroids, RCUK, STFC, /dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/3100/3103, /dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/1900/1912, Trans-Neptunian object, Population, education.field_of_study, education, Trojan, Solar System, Astronomy, Planet, Eccentricity (behavior), media_common.quotation_subject, media_common, Jovian, Planetesimal, Physics
Funded by
NSF| Collaborative Research: Characterizing the Trans-Neptunian Solar System with the Dark Energy Survey
Project
  • Funder: National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • Project Code: 1515015
,
NSF| Collaborative Research: The Dark Energy Survey Data Management Operations
Project
  • Funder: National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • Project Code: 1138766
  • Funding stream: Directorate for Mathematical & Physical Sciences | Division of Astronomical Sciences
,
EC| COGS
Project
COGS
Capitalizing on Gravitational Shear
  • Funder: European Commission (EC)
  • Project Code: 240672
  • Funding stream: FP7 | SP2 | ERC
,
NSF| Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP)
Project
  • Funder: National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • Project Code: 1256260
  • Funding stream: Directorate for Education & Human Resources | Division of Graduate Education
,
EC| TESTDE
Project
TESTDE
Testing the Dark Energy Paradigm and Measuring Neutrino Mass with the Dark Energy Survey
  • Funder: European Commission (EC)
  • Project Code: 291329
  • Funding stream: FP7 | SP2 | ERC
27 references, page 1 of 2

[1] R. Brasser, K. A. Innanen, M. Connors, C. Veillet, P. Wiegert, S. Mikkola, P. W. Chodas, Transient co-orbital asteroids, Icarus 171 (2004) 102{109, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2004.04.019. [OpenAIRE]

[2] C. de la Fuente Marcos, R. de la Fuente Marcos, Four temporary Neptune co-orbitals: (148975) 2001 XA255, (310071) 2010 KR59, (316179) 2010 EN65, and 2012 GX17, Astronomy and Astrophysics 547 L2, doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201220377.

[3] D. Nesvorny, L. Dones, How Long-Lived Are the Hypothetical Trojan Populations of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune?, Icarus 160 (2002) 271{288, doi:10.1006/icar.2002.6961.

[4] F. Marzari, P. Tricarico, H. Scholl, The MATROS project: Stability of Uranus and Neptune Trojans. The case of 2001 QR322, Astronomy and Astrophysics 410 (2003) 725{734, doi:10.1051/0004- 6361:20031275.

[5] M. Alexandersen, B. Gladman, J. J. Kavelaars, J.-M. Petit, S. D. J. Gwyn, C. J. Shankman, R. E. Pike, A Carefully Characterized and Tracked Trans-Neptunian Survey: The Size distribution of the Plutinos and the Number of Neptunian Trojans, Astronomical Journal 152 111, doi:10.3847/0004- 6256/152/5/111.

[6] E. I. Chiang, A. B. Jordan, R. L. Millis, M. W. Buie, L. H. Wasserman, J. L. Elliot, S. D. Kern, D. E. Trilling, K. J. Meech, R. M. Wagner, Resonance Occupation in the Kuiper Belt: Case Examples of the 5:2 and Trojan Resonances, Astronomical Journal 126 (2003) 430{443, doi:10.1086/375207.

[7] H. W. Lin, Y.-T. Chen, K. Volk, et. al., OSSOS XV: The Stable Neptunian Trojans and Their Intrinsic Inclination Distribution, in prep .

[8] S. S. Sheppard, C. A. Trujillo, The Size Distribution of the Neptune Trojans and the Missing Intermediate-sized Planetesimals, Astrophysical Journal Letters 723 (2010) L233{L237, doi: 10.1088/2041-8205/723/2/L233.

[9] S. S. Sheppard, C. A. Trujillo, Detection of a Trailing (L5) Neptune Trojan, Science 329 (2010) 1304, doi:10.1126/science.1189666.

[10] S. S. Sheppard, C. A. Trujillo, A Thick Cloud of Neptune Trojans and Their Colors, Science 313 (2006) 511{514, doi:10.1126/science.1127173.

[11] Y.-Y. Chen, Y. Ma, J. Zheng, The e ect of orbital damping during planet migration on the inclination and eccentricity distributions of Neptunian Trojans, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 458 (2016) 4277{4284, doi:10.1093/mnras/stw361.

[12] E. I. Chiang, Y. Lithwick, Neptune Trojans as a Test Bed for Planet Formation, Astrophysical Journal 628 (2005) 520{532, doi:10.1086/430825. [OpenAIRE]

[13] S. J. Kortenkamp, R. Malhotra, T. Michtchenko, Survival of Trojan-type companions of Neptune during primordial planet migration, Icarus 167 (2004) 347{359, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2003.09.021. [OpenAIRE]

[14] R. Gomes, H. F. Levison, K. Tsiganis, A. Morbidelli, Origin of the cataclysmic Late Heavy Bombardment period of the terrestrial planets, Nature 435 (2005) 466{469, doi:10.1038/nature03676.

[15] K. Tsiganis, R. Gomes, A. Morbidelli, H. F. Levison, Origin of the orbital architecture of the giant planets of the Solar System, Nature 435 (2005) 459{461, doi:10.1038/nature03539. [OpenAIRE]

27 references, page 1 of 2
Abstract
<p>In the current model of early Solar System evolution, the stable members of the Jovian and Neptunian Trojan populations were captured into resonance from the leftover reservoir of planetesimals during the outward migration of the giant planets. As a result, both Jovian and Neptunian Trojans share a common origin with the primordial disk population, whose other surviving members constitute today's trans-Neptunian object (TNO) populations. The cold (low inclination and small eccentricity) classical TNOs are ultra-red, while the dynamically excited “hot” (high inclination and larger eccentricity) population of TNOs contains a mixture of ultra-red and blue object...
Subjects
free text keywords: Space and Planetary Science, Astronomy and Astrophysics, Astrophysics - Earth and Planetary Astrophysics, Trojan asteroids, Trans-Neptunian objects, Resonances, Orbital, Orbital, Resonances, Trans-Neptunian objects, Trojan asteroids, RCUK, STFC, /dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/3100/3103, /dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/1900/1912, Trans-Neptunian object, Population, education.field_of_study, education, Trojan, Solar System, Astronomy, Planet, Eccentricity (behavior), media_common.quotation_subject, media_common, Jovian, Planetesimal, Physics
Funded by
NSF| Collaborative Research: Characterizing the Trans-Neptunian Solar System with the Dark Energy Survey
Project
  • Funder: National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • Project Code: 1515015
,
NSF| Collaborative Research: The Dark Energy Survey Data Management Operations
Project
  • Funder: National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • Project Code: 1138766
  • Funding stream: Directorate for Mathematical & Physical Sciences | Division of Astronomical Sciences
,
EC| COGS
Project
COGS
Capitalizing on Gravitational Shear
  • Funder: European Commission (EC)
  • Project Code: 240672
  • Funding stream: FP7 | SP2 | ERC
,
NSF| Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP)
Project
  • Funder: National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • Project Code: 1256260
  • Funding stream: Directorate for Education & Human Resources | Division of Graduate Education
,
EC| TESTDE
Project
TESTDE
Testing the Dark Energy Paradigm and Measuring Neutrino Mass with the Dark Energy Survey
  • Funder: European Commission (EC)
  • Project Code: 291329
  • Funding stream: FP7 | SP2 | ERC
27 references, page 1 of 2

[1] R. Brasser, K. A. Innanen, M. Connors, C. Veillet, P. Wiegert, S. Mikkola, P. W. Chodas, Transient co-orbital asteroids, Icarus 171 (2004) 102{109, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2004.04.019. [OpenAIRE]

[2] C. de la Fuente Marcos, R. de la Fuente Marcos, Four temporary Neptune co-orbitals: (148975) 2001 XA255, (310071) 2010 KR59, (316179) 2010 EN65, and 2012 GX17, Astronomy and Astrophysics 547 L2, doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201220377.

[3] D. Nesvorny, L. Dones, How Long-Lived Are the Hypothetical Trojan Populations of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune?, Icarus 160 (2002) 271{288, doi:10.1006/icar.2002.6961.

[4] F. Marzari, P. Tricarico, H. Scholl, The MATROS project: Stability of Uranus and Neptune Trojans. The case of 2001 QR322, Astronomy and Astrophysics 410 (2003) 725{734, doi:10.1051/0004- 6361:20031275.

[5] M. Alexandersen, B. Gladman, J. J. Kavelaars, J.-M. Petit, S. D. J. Gwyn, C. J. Shankman, R. E. Pike, A Carefully Characterized and Tracked Trans-Neptunian Survey: The Size distribution of the Plutinos and the Number of Neptunian Trojans, Astronomical Journal 152 111, doi:10.3847/0004- 6256/152/5/111.

[6] E. I. Chiang, A. B. Jordan, R. L. Millis, M. W. Buie, L. H. Wasserman, J. L. Elliot, S. D. Kern, D. E. Trilling, K. J. Meech, R. M. Wagner, Resonance Occupation in the Kuiper Belt: Case Examples of the 5:2 and Trojan Resonances, Astronomical Journal 126 (2003) 430{443, doi:10.1086/375207.

[7] H. W. Lin, Y.-T. Chen, K. Volk, et. al., OSSOS XV: The Stable Neptunian Trojans and Their Intrinsic Inclination Distribution, in prep .

[8] S. S. Sheppard, C. A. Trujillo, The Size Distribution of the Neptune Trojans and the Missing Intermediate-sized Planetesimals, Astrophysical Journal Letters 723 (2010) L233{L237, doi: 10.1088/2041-8205/723/2/L233.

[9] S. S. Sheppard, C. A. Trujillo, Detection of a Trailing (L5) Neptune Trojan, Science 329 (2010) 1304, doi:10.1126/science.1189666.

[10] S. S. Sheppard, C. A. Trujillo, A Thick Cloud of Neptune Trojans and Their Colors, Science 313 (2006) 511{514, doi:10.1126/science.1127173.

[11] Y.-Y. Chen, Y. Ma, J. Zheng, The e ect of orbital damping during planet migration on the inclination and eccentricity distributions of Neptunian Trojans, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 458 (2016) 4277{4284, doi:10.1093/mnras/stw361.

[12] E. I. Chiang, Y. Lithwick, Neptune Trojans as a Test Bed for Planet Formation, Astrophysical Journal 628 (2005) 520{532, doi:10.1086/430825. [OpenAIRE]

[13] S. J. Kortenkamp, R. Malhotra, T. Michtchenko, Survival of Trojan-type companions of Neptune during primordial planet migration, Icarus 167 (2004) 347{359, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2003.09.021. [OpenAIRE]

[14] R. Gomes, H. F. Levison, K. Tsiganis, A. Morbidelli, Origin of the cataclysmic Late Heavy Bombardment period of the terrestrial planets, Nature 435 (2005) 466{469, doi:10.1038/nature03676.

[15] K. Tsiganis, R. Gomes, A. Morbidelli, H. F. Levison, Origin of the orbital architecture of the giant planets of the Solar System, Nature 435 (2005) 459{461, doi:10.1038/nature03539. [OpenAIRE]

27 references, page 1 of 2
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