publication . Master thesis . 2016

Cervical cancer vaccination for my daughter, no thanks: A research synthesis on parental explained barriers to delayed or non-acceptance of HPV vaccination in high-income (OECD) nations. Parental expressed reasons on why they delay or rejected HPV vaccination for their daughters aged 9-17 within OECD nations between 2008 and 2016

Ayino, Kenneth A.;
Open Access English
  • Published: 07 Apr 2016
  • Publisher: UiT The Arctic University of Norway
Abstract
Background: The World Health Organization including high income nations recommends that Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination should be given to young girls as they believe it’s the best available method to reduce cervical cancer morbidity and mortality. HPV vaccination remains lower than anticipated within OECD nations. Through responses, we may understand the main reasons to why parents delayed or declined to accept their daughters to be vaccinated. Objective: To determine and identify themes, factors and barriers explaining why parents decide to delay or refuse to accept HPV vaccination for their daughter’s aged 9-17. To ascertain whether social media an...
Subjects
free text keywords: VDP::Medical disciplines: 700::Health sciences: 800::Preventive medicine: 804, HEL-3950, Qualitative Meta-summary, VDP::Medisinske Fag: 700::Helsefag: 800::Forebyggende medisin: 804, systematic review, qualitative and quantitative data

13. Advised against, no visit or no recommendation.

16. Other medical conditions: Contra-indicated, special needs handicapped, medical reasons and sickness.

10. Cost related: No insurance, too expensive, not covered by insurance.

18. Lack of trust in: Government, pharmaceutical companies. Don't trust public health, rushed & pressured decision, previous vaccine mistrust.

17. Religion and family decision roles in deciding: Religion/orthodox opposes, against family beliefs, cultural and religious values.

20. Media and internet influence: Information read online, peer and media influence, bad publicity, media reports.

Abstract
Background: The World Health Organization including high income nations recommends that Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination should be given to young girls as they believe it’s the best available method to reduce cervical cancer morbidity and mortality. HPV vaccination remains lower than anticipated within OECD nations. Through responses, we may understand the main reasons to why parents delayed or declined to accept their daughters to be vaccinated. Objective: To determine and identify themes, factors and barriers explaining why parents decide to delay or refuse to accept HPV vaccination for their daughter’s aged 9-17. To ascertain whether social media an...
Subjects
free text keywords: VDP::Medical disciplines: 700::Health sciences: 800::Preventive medicine: 804, HEL-3950, Qualitative Meta-summary, VDP::Medisinske Fag: 700::Helsefag: 800::Forebyggende medisin: 804, systematic review, qualitative and quantitative data

13. Advised against, no visit or no recommendation.

16. Other medical conditions: Contra-indicated, special needs handicapped, medical reasons and sickness.

10. Cost related: No insurance, too expensive, not covered by insurance.

18. Lack of trust in: Government, pharmaceutical companies. Don't trust public health, rushed & pressured decision, previous vaccine mistrust.

17. Religion and family decision roles in deciding: Religion/orthodox opposes, against family beliefs, cultural and religious values.

20. Media and internet influence: Information read online, peer and media influence, bad publicity, media reports.

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publication . Master thesis . 2016

Cervical cancer vaccination for my daughter, no thanks: A research synthesis on parental explained barriers to delayed or non-acceptance of HPV vaccination in high-income (OECD) nations. Parental expressed reasons on why they delay or rejected HPV vaccination for their daughters aged 9-17 within OECD nations between 2008 and 2016

Ayino, Kenneth A.;