publication . Article . 2013

Using computer decision support systems in NHS emergency and urgent care: ethnographic study using normalisation process theory

Pope, Catherine; Halford, Susan; Turnbull, Joanne; Prichard, Jane S.; Calestani, Melania; May, Carl;
Open Access English
  • Published: 01 Mar 2013 Journal: volume 13, issue 1, pages 111-111issn: 1472-6963, eissn: 1472-6963, Copyright policy
  • Publisher: Springer Nature
Abstract
Background: information and communication technologies (ICTs) are often proposed as ‘technological fixes’ for problems facing healthcare. They promise to deliver services more quickly and cheaply. Yet research on the implementation of ICTs reveals a litany of delays, compromises and failures. Case studies have established that these technologies are difficult to embed in everyday healthcare.<br/><br/>Methods: we undertook an ethnographic comparative analysis of a single computer decision support system in three different settings to understand the implementation and everyday use of this technology which is designed to deal with calls to emergency and urgent care...
Subjects
free text keywords: alliedhealth, computer, Research Article, Health Policy, Normalisation process theory, Computer technology, Urgent care, Emergency care, CDSS
62 references, page 1 of 5

1. Bates D: The quality case for information technology in healthcare. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making 2002, 2:7. doi:10.1186/1472-6947-2-7. [OpenAIRE]

2. Taylor R, Bower A, Girosi F, Bigelow J, Fonkych K, Hillestad R: Promoting Health Information Technology: Is There A Case For More-Aggressive Government Action? Heal Aff 2005, 24(5):1234-1245.

3. Young C, Ayling M: Digital First: the delivery choice for England's population. London: NHS Transform; 2011. http://digital.innovation.nhs.uk/dl/ cv_content/32200 [accessed 12/3/13].

4. Darzi A: High Quality Care For All NHS Next Stage Review Final Report. Command Paper. CM7432. London: Department of Health; 2008. http:// webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20130107105354/http://www.dh.gov.uk/ en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/ DH_085825 (accessed 16/1/12).

5. MacFarlane A, Murphy A: Clerkin P. Telemedicine services in the republic of Ireland: an evolving policy context. Health Policy. 2006, 76:246-258.

6. Dyb K, Halford S: Placing globalising technologies: telemedicine and the making of place. Sociology 2009, 43(2):232-249.

7. Barlow J, Singh D, Bayer S, Curry R: A systematic review of the benefits of home telecare for frail elderly people and those with long term conditions. Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare 2007, 13:172-179.

8. Webster A: Information and communications technologies and health care: user centered devices and patient work. In Digital Welfare for the Third Age: health and social care informatics for older people. Edited by Loader B, Hardey M, Keeble L. London: Routledge; 2009.

9. Westbrook JI, Braithwaite J: Will information and communication technology disrupt the health system and deliver on its promise? Medical J Aust 2010, 193(7):399.

10. Finch TL, Mair FS, May C: Teledermatology in the U.K.: lessons in service innovation. Br J Dermatol 2007, 156(3):521-532.

11. Haux R: Health information systems: past, present, future. Int J Med Inform 2006, 75:268-281.

12. Doolin B: Power and resistance in the implementation of a medical management information system. Inf Syst J 2004, 14(4):343-362.

13. Timmons S: Nurses resisting information technology. Nurs Inq 2003, 10(4):257-269.

14. Dent M: Organisation and change in renal work: a study of the impact of a computer system within two hospitals. Sociology of Health and Illness 1990, 12:413-431.

15. Li J, Westbrook J, Callen J, Georgiou A: The role of ICT in supporting disruptive innovation: a multi-site qualitative study of nurse practitioners in emergency departments. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making 2012, 12:27. [OpenAIRE]

62 references, page 1 of 5
Abstract
Background: information and communication technologies (ICTs) are often proposed as ‘technological fixes’ for problems facing healthcare. They promise to deliver services more quickly and cheaply. Yet research on the implementation of ICTs reveals a litany of delays, compromises and failures. Case studies have established that these technologies are difficult to embed in everyday healthcare.<br/><br/>Methods: we undertook an ethnographic comparative analysis of a single computer decision support system in three different settings to understand the implementation and everyday use of this technology which is designed to deal with calls to emergency and urgent care...
Subjects
free text keywords: alliedhealth, computer, Research Article, Health Policy, Normalisation process theory, Computer technology, Urgent care, Emergency care, CDSS
62 references, page 1 of 5

1. Bates D: The quality case for information technology in healthcare. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making 2002, 2:7. doi:10.1186/1472-6947-2-7. [OpenAIRE]

2. Taylor R, Bower A, Girosi F, Bigelow J, Fonkych K, Hillestad R: Promoting Health Information Technology: Is There A Case For More-Aggressive Government Action? Heal Aff 2005, 24(5):1234-1245.

3. Young C, Ayling M: Digital First: the delivery choice for England's population. London: NHS Transform; 2011. http://digital.innovation.nhs.uk/dl/ cv_content/32200 [accessed 12/3/13].

4. Darzi A: High Quality Care For All NHS Next Stage Review Final Report. Command Paper. CM7432. London: Department of Health; 2008. http:// webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20130107105354/http://www.dh.gov.uk/ en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/ DH_085825 (accessed 16/1/12).

5. MacFarlane A, Murphy A: Clerkin P. Telemedicine services in the republic of Ireland: an evolving policy context. Health Policy. 2006, 76:246-258.

6. Dyb K, Halford S: Placing globalising technologies: telemedicine and the making of place. Sociology 2009, 43(2):232-249.

7. Barlow J, Singh D, Bayer S, Curry R: A systematic review of the benefits of home telecare for frail elderly people and those with long term conditions. Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare 2007, 13:172-179.

8. Webster A: Information and communications technologies and health care: user centered devices and patient work. In Digital Welfare for the Third Age: health and social care informatics for older people. Edited by Loader B, Hardey M, Keeble L. London: Routledge; 2009.

9. Westbrook JI, Braithwaite J: Will information and communication technology disrupt the health system and deliver on its promise? Medical J Aust 2010, 193(7):399.

10. Finch TL, Mair FS, May C: Teledermatology in the U.K.: lessons in service innovation. Br J Dermatol 2007, 156(3):521-532.

11. Haux R: Health information systems: past, present, future. Int J Med Inform 2006, 75:268-281.

12. Doolin B: Power and resistance in the implementation of a medical management information system. Inf Syst J 2004, 14(4):343-362.

13. Timmons S: Nurses resisting information technology. Nurs Inq 2003, 10(4):257-269.

14. Dent M: Organisation and change in renal work: a study of the impact of a computer system within two hospitals. Sociology of Health and Illness 1990, 12:413-431.

15. Li J, Westbrook J, Callen J, Georgiou A: The role of ICT in supporting disruptive innovation: a multi-site qualitative study of nurse practitioners in emergency departments. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making 2012, 12:27. [OpenAIRE]

62 references, page 1 of 5
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publication . Article . 2013

Using computer decision support systems in NHS emergency and urgent care: ethnographic study using normalisation process theory

Pope, Catherine; Halford, Susan; Turnbull, Joanne; Prichard, Jane S.; Calestani, Melania; May, Carl;