publication . Article . 2016

Comparative genomic analyses reveal broad diversity in botulinum-toxin-producing Clostridia

Williamson, Charles H. D.; Sahl, Jason W.; Smith, Theresa J.; Xie, Gary; Foley, Brian T.; Smith, Leonard A.; Fernández, Rafael A.; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu; Keim, Paul; ...
Open Access English
  • Published: 01 Mar 2016 Journal: BMC Genomics, volume 17, issue 1 (issn: 1471-2164, eissn: 1471-2164, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: BioMed Central
Abstract
Background Clostridium botulinum is a diverse group of bacteria characterized by the production of botulinum neurotoxin. Botulinum neurotoxins are classified into serotypes (BoNT/A–G), which are produced by six species/Groups of Clostridia, but the genetic background of the bacteria remains poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to use comparative genomics to provide insights into the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of bacteria that produce the potent botulinum neurotoxin. Results Comparative genomic analyses of over 170 Clostridia genomes, including our draft genome assemblies for 59 newly sequenced Clostridia strains from six continents an...
Subjects
free text keywords: Biotechnology, DNA-SEQUENCING DATA, Research Article, Clostridium botulinum, GROUP-I, FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM, FIELD GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS, NEUROTOXIN COMPLEX GENES, Botulinum neurotoxin, Comparative genomics, FOOD, 416 Food Science, 1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology, PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS, Genetics, HIGH-THROUGHPUT, Whole genome sequence, INFANT BOTULISM, E STRAINS
104 references, page 1 of 7

1. Smith TJ, Hill KK, Xie G, Foley BT, Williamson CHD, Foster JT, et al. Genomic sequences of six botulinum neurotoxin-producing strains representing three Clostridial species illustrate the mobility and diversity of botulinum neurotoxin genes. Infect Genet Evol. 2015;30:102-13.

2. Peck MW. Biology and genomic analysis of Clostridium botulinum. Adv Microb Physiol. 2009;55:183-320.

3. Hill KK, Smith TJ. Genetic diversity within Clostridium botulinum serotypes, botulinum neurotoxin gene clusters and toxin subtypes. In: Rummel A, Binz T, editors. Botulinum neurotoxins. Springer: Berlin Heidelberg; 2013. p. 1-20.

4. Dover N, Barash JR, Hill KK, Xie G, Arnon SS. Molecular characterization of a novel botulinum neurotoxin type H gene. J Infect Dis. 2014;209:192-202.

5. Kalb SR, Baudys J, Raphael BH, Dykes JK, Lúquez C, Maslanka SE, et al. Functional characterization of botulinum neurotoxin serotype H as a hybrid of known serotypes F and A (BoNT F/A). Anal Chem. 2015;87:3911-7.

6. Collins MD, East AK. Phylogeny and taxonomy of the food-borne pathogen Clostridium botulinum and its neurotoxins. J Appl Micro. 1998;84:5-17.

7. Hill KK, Smith TJ, Helma CH, Ticknor LO, Foley BT, Svensson RT, et al. Genetic diversity among botulinum neurotoxin-producing Clostridial strains. J Bacteriol. 2007;189:818-32.

8. Moriishi K, Koura M, Abe N, Fujii N, Fujinaga Y, Inoue K, et al. Mosaic structures of neurotoxins produced from Clostridium botulinum types C and D organisms. Biochim Biophys Acta. 1996;1307:123-6.

9. Hill KK, Xie G, Foley BT, Smith TJ, Munk AC, Bruce D, et al. Recombination and insertion events involving the botulinum neurotoxin complex genes in Clostridium botulinum types A, B, E and F and Clostridium butyricum type E strains. BMC Biol. 2009;7:66.

10. Skarin H, Segerman B. Horizontal gene transfer of toxin genes in Clostridium botulinum. Mob Genet Elements. 2011;1:213-5. [OpenAIRE]

11. Skarin H, Håfström T, Westerberg J, Segerman B. Clostridium botulinum Group III: a group with dual identity shaped by plasmids, phages and mobile elements. BMC Genomics. 2011;12:185. [OpenAIRE]

12. Smith TJ, Hill KK, Raphael BH. Historical and current perspectives on Clostridium botulinum diversity. Res Microbiol. 2014;166:290-302.

13. Sebaihia M, Peck MW, Minton NP, Thomson NR, Holden MTG, Mitchell WJ, et al. Genome sequence of a proteolytic (Group I) Clostridium botulinum strain Hall A and comparative analysis of the Clostridial genomes. Genome Res. 2007;17:1082-92. [OpenAIRE]

14. Lindström M, Hinderink K, Somervuo P, Kiviniemi K, Nevas M, Chen Y, et al. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of two predominant Nordic Group I (proteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type B clusters. Appl Environ Microb. 2009;75:2643-51. [OpenAIRE]

15. Stringer SC, Carter AT, Webb MD, Wachnicka E, Crossman LC, Sebaihia M, et al. Genomic and physiological variability within Group II (non-proteolytic) Clostridium botulinum. BMC Genomics. 2013;14:333.

104 references, page 1 of 7
Abstract
Background Clostridium botulinum is a diverse group of bacteria characterized by the production of botulinum neurotoxin. Botulinum neurotoxins are classified into serotypes (BoNT/A–G), which are produced by six species/Groups of Clostridia, but the genetic background of the bacteria remains poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to use comparative genomics to provide insights into the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of bacteria that produce the potent botulinum neurotoxin. Results Comparative genomic analyses of over 170 Clostridia genomes, including our draft genome assemblies for 59 newly sequenced Clostridia strains from six continents an...
Subjects
free text keywords: Biotechnology, DNA-SEQUENCING DATA, Research Article, Clostridium botulinum, GROUP-I, FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM, FIELD GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS, NEUROTOXIN COMPLEX GENES, Botulinum neurotoxin, Comparative genomics, FOOD, 416 Food Science, 1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology, PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS, Genetics, HIGH-THROUGHPUT, Whole genome sequence, INFANT BOTULISM, E STRAINS
104 references, page 1 of 7

1. Smith TJ, Hill KK, Xie G, Foley BT, Williamson CHD, Foster JT, et al. Genomic sequences of six botulinum neurotoxin-producing strains representing three Clostridial species illustrate the mobility and diversity of botulinum neurotoxin genes. Infect Genet Evol. 2015;30:102-13.

2. Peck MW. Biology and genomic analysis of Clostridium botulinum. Adv Microb Physiol. 2009;55:183-320.

3. Hill KK, Smith TJ. Genetic diversity within Clostridium botulinum serotypes, botulinum neurotoxin gene clusters and toxin subtypes. In: Rummel A, Binz T, editors. Botulinum neurotoxins. Springer: Berlin Heidelberg; 2013. p. 1-20.

4. Dover N, Barash JR, Hill KK, Xie G, Arnon SS. Molecular characterization of a novel botulinum neurotoxin type H gene. J Infect Dis. 2014;209:192-202.

5. Kalb SR, Baudys J, Raphael BH, Dykes JK, Lúquez C, Maslanka SE, et al. Functional characterization of botulinum neurotoxin serotype H as a hybrid of known serotypes F and A (BoNT F/A). Anal Chem. 2015;87:3911-7.

6. Collins MD, East AK. Phylogeny and taxonomy of the food-borne pathogen Clostridium botulinum and its neurotoxins. J Appl Micro. 1998;84:5-17.

7. Hill KK, Smith TJ, Helma CH, Ticknor LO, Foley BT, Svensson RT, et al. Genetic diversity among botulinum neurotoxin-producing Clostridial strains. J Bacteriol. 2007;189:818-32.

8. Moriishi K, Koura M, Abe N, Fujii N, Fujinaga Y, Inoue K, et al. Mosaic structures of neurotoxins produced from Clostridium botulinum types C and D organisms. Biochim Biophys Acta. 1996;1307:123-6.

9. Hill KK, Xie G, Foley BT, Smith TJ, Munk AC, Bruce D, et al. Recombination and insertion events involving the botulinum neurotoxin complex genes in Clostridium botulinum types A, B, E and F and Clostridium butyricum type E strains. BMC Biol. 2009;7:66.

10. Skarin H, Segerman B. Horizontal gene transfer of toxin genes in Clostridium botulinum. Mob Genet Elements. 2011;1:213-5. [OpenAIRE]

11. Skarin H, Håfström T, Westerberg J, Segerman B. Clostridium botulinum Group III: a group with dual identity shaped by plasmids, phages and mobile elements. BMC Genomics. 2011;12:185. [OpenAIRE]

12. Smith TJ, Hill KK, Raphael BH. Historical and current perspectives on Clostridium botulinum diversity. Res Microbiol. 2014;166:290-302.

13. Sebaihia M, Peck MW, Minton NP, Thomson NR, Holden MTG, Mitchell WJ, et al. Genome sequence of a proteolytic (Group I) Clostridium botulinum strain Hall A and comparative analysis of the Clostridial genomes. Genome Res. 2007;17:1082-92. [OpenAIRE]

14. Lindström M, Hinderink K, Somervuo P, Kiviniemi K, Nevas M, Chen Y, et al. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of two predominant Nordic Group I (proteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type B clusters. Appl Environ Microb. 2009;75:2643-51. [OpenAIRE]

15. Stringer SC, Carter AT, Webb MD, Wachnicka E, Crossman LC, Sebaihia M, et al. Genomic and physiological variability within Group II (non-proteolytic) Clostridium botulinum. BMC Genomics. 2013;14:333.

104 references, page 1 of 7
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publication . Article . 2016

Comparative genomic analyses reveal broad diversity in botulinum-toxin-producing Clostridia

Williamson, Charles H. D.; Sahl, Jason W.; Smith, Theresa J.; Xie, Gary; Foley, Brian T.; Smith, Leonard A.; Fernández, Rafael A.; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu; Keim, Paul; ...