Sleep and eyewitness memory: Fewer false identifications after sleep when the target is absent from the lineup.

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Michelle E Stepan; Taylor M Dehnke; Kimberly M Fenn;
  • Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
  • Journal: PLoS ONE,volume 12,issue 9 (issn: 1932-6203, eissn: 1932-6203)
  • Publisher copyright policies & self-archiving
  • Related identifiers: pmc: PMC5587105, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0182907
  • Subject: Linguistics | Research Article | Memory | Cognitive Psychology | Memory Consolidation | Cognitive Linguistics | Sleep | Psychology | Biology and Life Sciences | Cognition | Neuroscience | Physiology | Medicine | Experimental Psychology | Q | R | Learning and Memory | Recall (Memory) | Social Sciences | Word Recognition | Decision Making | Science | Physiological Processes | Medicine and Health Sciences | False Memories | Cognitive Science

Inaccurate eyewitness identifications are the leading cause of known false convictions in the United States. Moreover, improving eyewitness memory is difficult and often unsuccessful. Sleep consistently strengthens and protects memory from interference, particularly whe... View more
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