Death in the Modern Greek Culture

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Pentaris, Panagiotis (2012)
  • Publisher: Hawaii Pacific University

Each culture recognizes and identifies death, dying and bereavement in unique ways. Commonly, a culture may be seen through the lens of death rituals; how those are shaped, interpreted and used by the society. This paper aims to look at the Modern Greek culture and depict its ‘visualization’ of death, as well as capture the rituals that mostly identify this specific culture. The Greek culture in overall is strongly influenced by the Greek Orthodox Church. Hence, the experiences of death, dying and bereavement are thread through religious beliefs and customs, alongside cultural norms.
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