Effectiveness of a perceptual - proprioceptive training with virtual visual feedback in healthy subjects: a pilot study

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Vando, Stefano ; Unim, Brigid ; Cassarino, Salvatore A ; Padulo, Johnny ; Masala, Daniele (2013)
  • Publisher: PREX
  • Journal: Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Public Health (issn: 2282-0930, eissn: 2282-0930)
  • Related identifiers: doi: 10.2427/8844
  • Subject: RA1-1270 | Keywords: proprioception, interactivity, Wii Balance Board, platform force feedback; motor control, virtual training, adaptability | R5-920 | Public aspects of medicine | Medicine (General) | Proprioception; Interactivity; Wii Balance Board; platform force feedback; Motor control; Virtual training; Adaptability | Settore MED/34 - Medicina Fisica e Riabilitativa

<p><strong>Background:</strong> the aim of this pilot study was to evaluate whether proprioceptive-motor training using the Wii Balance Board (WBB) might improve postural sway in healthy subjects.</p><p><strong>Methods:</strong> twenty-five healthy subjects were trained for six weeks (two sessions per week) with 5 “video games”: Wii Fit Plus (WFP) program. Before and after training: Basic Balance, Single-leg Balance, Agility, Stability and Motion (lower limb: right-left and both leg) were measured using the Wii Balance Board.</p><p><strong>Results:</strong> the Wilcoxon Test showed improvements at the end of the training program compared to the baseline conditions. Basic Balance increased during the WFP (33.33%) and was associated with a 19.92% decrease in center of pressure (COP) lenght. The Single-leg Balance results incremented after the WFP (left 29.09% vs. right 47.92%) and accompanied by a decrement in COP (left 28.71% vs. right 30.45%). The values for the Agility test increased both in WFP and COP (28.57% and 58.57%, respectively). The Stability test scores increased in the WFP (66.67%) along with a consequent decrease in COP (10.53%). Finally, the Motion test values increased in the WFP (73.17%), whilst COP for this test decreased (12.02%). These results indicate that 6 weeks of virtual training produced a good adaptability. Younger participants (&lt;20 years) demonstrated to be more responsive to dynamic stimulation with respect to those &gt;20 years.</p><p><strong>Conclusions:</strong> significant improvements in all participants were observed, indicating that virtual training can influence posture and balance in healthy people. Because of its characteristics of low cost and easy availability, a portable system for balance training for everyone offers the possibility to more readily measure motor skill and to gauge improvement.</p>
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